Physics of Biology

1909 Submissions

[59] viXra:1909.0629 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-28 07:02:58

Microscope Illuminates Biology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

The Columbia team behind the revolutionary 3-D SCAPE microscope announces today a new version of this high-speed imaging technology. [28] The discovery that protein therapeutics can hijack the HOPS complex to gain access to the cell interior should help scientists design therapeutic proteins to treat diseases that are not adequately treated using other approaches, Schepartz said. [27] DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. [26] For the English scientists involved, perhaps the most important fact is that their DNA read was about twice as long as the previous record, held by their Australian rivals. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important HYPERLINK "https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0734-6" study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/walker/" walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19]
Category: Physics of Biology

[58] viXra:1909.0625 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-28 08:28:02

Turbulence Connection for Dialysis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Patients with kidney failure often require arteriovenous grafts to be connected to dialysis machines for their lifesaving treatment. [43] Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light to destroy tumours by activating a photosensitive drug that creates reactive oxygen species that attack cancer cells. [42] A research team from the UK and Sweden has used dynamic flortaucipir-PET imaging to show that single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) can trigger signs of accumulation of neurodegenerative tau protein and lead to cognitive decline. [41] The nonviral, bioinspired gene delivery method developed by researchers at RMIT University has proven effective in laboratory tests and is safer than standard viral approaches. [40] Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have engineered genetically encoded protein crystals that can generate magnetic forces many times stronger than those already reported. [39] A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[57] viXra:1909.0617 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-29 00:55:44

Nanogels Drug Delivery to Cancer Patients

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed new guidelines for fabricating nanoscale gel materials, or nanogels, that can deliver numerous therapeutic treatments to treat cancer in a precise manner. In addition to enabling the delivery of drugs in response to tumors, their nanogels can target malignant cells (or biomarkers), degrade into nontoxic components and execute multiple clinical functions. [31] A revolutionary, cutting-edge technology, developed by researchers at Bar-Ilan University's Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), has the potential to provide a new alternative to eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser correction for refractive errors. [30] Electrons in graphene-an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike-move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[56] viXra:1909.0614 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-29 04:00:18

Revision and Supplement of the Theory of Dove-like Particles

Authors: Sun Zuodong
Comments: 4 Pages.

The theory of dove-like particles is a discussion on the reasons and mechanism of sporadic Alzheimer's disease, which was officially published on March 15, 2019. In this paper, the "basic content" of the theory of dove-like particles and the mechanism of action potential generation of Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley are revised, the related contents of ion pump and sodium-potassium pump are deleted, and the discussion of " organic ions and acidity-alkalinity " is added, and at the end of the conclusion, the following contents are added: The Aβ hypothesis misleads the research direction of the world's mainstream brain scientists. All the work based on the beta hypothesis has been unsuccessful. It may even become the confirmed habits are hard to get rid of "soft underbelly" of some scientists and "stumbling block" to conquered Alzheimer's disease. Its little results which seeming to be right but not so in fact is completely negligible compared with the enormous cost of human beings. Therefore, we must completely deny and abandon the Aβ hypothesis from the strategic height and academic level. Trying to revision and supplement it to keep it reluctantly, it is not scientific and has no practical significance, it confuses the gap between theory and practice.
Category: Physics of Biology

[55] viXra:1909.0599 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-27 08:34:15

Iridium Destroys Cancer Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light to destroy tumours by activating a photosensitive drug that creates reactive oxygen species that attack cancer cells. [42] A research team from the UK and Sweden has used dynamic flortaucipir-PET imaging to show that single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) can trigger signs of accumulation of neurodegenerative tau protein and lead to cognitive decline. [41] The nonviral, bioinspired gene delivery method developed by researchers at RMIT University has proven effective in laboratory tests and is safer than standard viral approaches. [40] Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have engineered genetically encoded protein crystals that can generate magnetic forces many times stronger than those already reported. [39] A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[54] viXra:1909.0588 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-28 03:46:07

Homochirality of Life

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Like the imbalance of matter and antimatter, the emergence of life based on molecules with a like chirality as opposed to their mirror opposites has long puzzled scientists. [37] David Armstrong studies a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in nature, yet only a few non-scientists know what it is. [36] Physicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have recently succeeded in observing parity violation in ytterbium atoms with different numbers of neutrons. [35] Exploring the mystery of molecular handedness in nature, scientists have proposed a new experimental scheme to create custom-made mirror molecules for analysis. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information-known as qubits-that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from HYPERLINK "https://www.rigetti.com/" Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[53] viXra:1909.0584 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-26 07:22:37

Nanotechnology Improves Chemotherapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[52] viXra:1909.0582 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-26 07:49:32

Biofuel Cell Runs on Sweat

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31] Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[51] viXra:1909.0580 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-26 08:13:00

Protein Crystals make Cells Magnetic

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have engineered genetically encoded protein crystals that can generate magnetic forces many times stronger than those already reported. [39] A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37]
Category: Physics of Biology

[50] viXra:1909.0579 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-26 08:47:09

Nonviral Gene Therapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

The nonviral, bioinspired gene delivery method developed by researchers at RMIT University has proven effective in laboratory tests and is safer than standard viral approaches. [40] Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have engineered genetically encoded protein crystals that can generate magnetic forces many times stronger than those already reported. [39] A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[49] viXra:1909.0564 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-27 03:37:49

Protein Tangles after Brain Injury

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

A research team from the UK and Sweden has used dynamic flortaucipir-PET imaging to show that single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) can trigger signs of accumulation of neurodegenerative tau protein and lead to cognitive decline. [41] The nonviral, bioinspired gene delivery method developed by researchers at RMIT University has proven effective in laboratory tests and is safer than standard viral approaches. [40] Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have engineered genetically encoded protein crystals that can generate magnetic forces many times stronger than those already reported. [39] A unique new flexible and stretchable device, worn against the skin and capable of producing electrical energy by transforming the compounds present in sweat, was recently developed and patented by CNRS researchers from l"Université Grenoble Alpes and the University of San Diego (U.S.). [38] Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[48] viXra:1909.0544 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-26 04:25:30

Interpretation of Action Potential Generation Mechanism in Cells by Potassium Channel "Origami Windmill" Model

Authors: Sun Zuodong
Comments: 9 Pages.

The mechanism of cell action potential was explained by using the principle of potassium channel "origami windmill" model. It is inferred that ion channels should include at least two categories: One kind of channel is "special ion channel", its structure is like an origami windmill model. All cations passing through this channel rotate into the interior from one-way, only in and no out. Compared with K+, they have two states of "open" and "closed", When they are "open", their aperture is not less than K+ diameter. When "closed", their aperture is smaller than K+ diameter, but not smaller than Na+ diameter. The other channel is the "universal ion channel". All Ions passing through this channel unidirectional flow too, only out and no in. Compared with K+, they have two states of "open" and "closed", When they are "open", their aperture is not less than K+ diameter. When "closed", their aperture is smaller than K+ diameter, but not smaller than Na+ diameter. This model reasonably explains the whole process of action potential occurrence, and supports Hodgkin, Huxley 's experimental the results of action potential. This model does not support their explanation of the mechanism of action potential generation in cells and the core ideas of "membrane theory" and "ion theory". It negates the selective filter atomic model and the propeller model established by MacKinnon et al. It is tiped that the main role of "sodium-potassium pump" or "ATPase" is not responsible for the transport of Na+ and K+ from the inside and outside of the cell and maintaining cell membrane potential. The channels through which ions enter and escape cells are independent. This suggests that most channels may be sharing in the same direction by other inorganic ions and organic molecules.
Category: Physics of Biology

[47] viXra:1909.0510 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-25 02:35:37

Record-Fast Neutron Tomography

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 24 Pages.

For the first time, researchers have captured neutron tomography images in about a second, nearly an order of magnitude faster than previously reported attempts. [14] Coupled with SNS, the world's most powerful pulsed accelerator-based neutron source, VENUS will be the only open research facility platform in the US to provide time-of-flight neutron imaging capabilities to users from academia and industry. [13] A spallation neutron source has been used by physicists in Japan to search for possible violations of the inverse square law of gravity. [12] Physicists have proposed a way to test quantum gravity that, in principle, could be performed by a laser-based, table-top experiment using currently available technology. [11] Now however, a new type of materials, the so-called Weyl semimetals, similar to 3-D graphene, allow us to put the symmetry destructing quantum anomaly to work in everyday phenomena, such as the creation of electric current. [10] Physicist Professor Chunnong Zhao and his recent PhD students Haixing Miao and Yiqiu Ma are members of an international team that has created a particularly exciting new design for gravitational wave detectors. [9] A proposal for a gravitational-wave detector made of two space-based atomic clocks has been unveiled by physicists in the US. [8] The gravitational waves were detected by both of the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington, USA. [7] A team of researchers with the University of Lisbon has created simulations that indicate that the gravitational waves detected by researchers with the LIGO project, and which are believed to have come about due to two black holes colliding, could just have easily come from another object such as a gravaster (objects which are believed to have their insides made of dark energy) or even a wormhole. In their paper published in Physical Review Letters, the team describes the simulations they created, what was seen and what they are hoping to find in the future. [6] In a landmark discovery for physics and astronomy, international scientists said Thursday they have glimpsed the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time, which Albert Einstein predicted a century ago. [5] Scientists at the National Institute for Space Research in Brazil say an undiscovered type of matter could be found in neutron stars (illustration shown). Here matter is so dense that it could be 'squashed' into strange matter. This would create an entire 'strange star'-unlike anything we have seen. [4] The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the electromagnetic inertia, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Physics of Biology

[46] viXra:1909.0497 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-23 11:29:21

DNA held by Hydrophobic Forces

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have disproved the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11] Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8]
Category: Physics of Biology

[45] viXra:1909.0493 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-24 00:51:24

Molecular Footballs in X-Ray Laser Beam

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11] Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8]
Category: Physics of Biology

[44] viXra:1909.0491 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-24 02:41:14

Biocompatible Laser in Living Tissues

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them. [19] An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase—a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14]
Category: Physics of Biology

[43] viXra:1909.0450 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-22 04:50:20

Electric Tech Reverse Baldness

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

But reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. [48] In Japan Science and Technology Agency's Strategic Basic Research Programs, Associate Professor Toshiaki Kato and Professor Toshiro Kaneko of the Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University succeeded in clarifying a new synthesis mechanism regarding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), which are semiconductor atomic sheets having thickness in atomic order. [47]
Category: Physics of Biology

[42] viXra:1909.0449 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-22 04:59:48

Exosome Therapy of Age-Damaged Skin

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that exosomes harvested from human skin cells are more effective at repairing sun-damaged skin cells in mice than popular retinol or stem cell-based treatments currently in use. [49]
Category: Physics of Biology

[41] viXra:1909.0426 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-21 03:22:37

Heart and Brain Activity Sensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

"Sensors with an integrated power supply in such small sizes are also exciting for applications in the area of the Internet of Things, which connects decentralised, autonomous electronic systems," added Adelung. [23] Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time frames of just one quadrillionth of a second-or a femtosecond. [22] DNA forensics is a powerful tool, yet it presents a computational scaling problem when it is improved and expanded for complex samples (those containing DNA from more than one individual) and kinship analysis. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15]
Category: Physics of Biology

[40] viXra:1909.0425 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-21 03:48:47

MR-Guidance in Cancer Radiotherapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

"We encourage our prostate cancer patients to elect this treatment, but if they are not suitable candidates for MRgRT, or do not wish to travel to Amsterdam to VUmc, they receive more fractionated radiotherapy, 20 fractions of 3 Gy, after gold fiducials have been implanted." [23] Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time frames of just one quadrillionth of a second-or a femtosecond. [22] DNA forensics is a powerful tool, yet it presents a computational scaling problem when it is improved and expanded for complex samples (those containing DNA from more than one individual) and kinship analysis. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15]
Category: Physics of Biology

[39] viXra:1909.0424 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-21 04:04:15

Data Storage in DNA

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Scientists from Israel recently demonstrated how this process may become more cost-effective and efficient by introducing more “letters” to the DNA “alphabet”. [18] Globally, biodiversity is concentrated around the equator, but the scientific institutions generating DNA sequence data to study that biodiversity tend to be clustered in developed countries toward the poles. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15]
Category: Physics of Biology

[38] viXra:1909.0423 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-21 04:24:17

Nanoparticles Made by Bacteria

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Webster and his colleagues are using bacteria to produce nanoparticles, metallic particles that are between one and 100 nanometers wide. [23] Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time frames of just one quadrillionth of a second-or a femtosecond. [22] DNA forensics is a powerful tool, yet it presents a computational scaling problem when it is improved and expanded for complex samples (those containing DNA from more than one individual) and kinship analysis. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14]
Category: Physics of Biology

[37] viXra:1909.0413 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-19 11:22:04

DNA Microcapsules with Ion Channels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. [20] Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are now able to see greater details of DNA origami nanostructures, which will lead to a greater understanding and control of their assembly for future applications. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18] DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11] Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology.
Category: Physics of Biology

[36] viXra:1909.0403 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-20 04:33:09

Radiation Damage Observation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time frames of just one quadrillionth of a second-or a femtosecond. [22] DNA forensics is a powerful tool, yet it presents a computational scaling problem when it is improved and expanded for complex samples (those containing DNA from more than one individual) and kinship analysis. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14]
Category: Physics of Biology

[35] viXra:1909.0396 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-18 07:14:06

Real-Time Imaging in Medicine

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue-an area with many potential applications in the medical field. [36] The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before.
Category: Physics of Biology

[34] viXra:1909.0395 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-18 07:31:10

Blood Vessels in the Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

A team of researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology has designed a new surgical tool that is maneuverable through some of the narrowest twisting networks of blood vessels to help treat stroke and aneurysm. [37] A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue-an area with many potential applications in the medical field. [36] The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. [35] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28]
Category: Physics of Biology

[33] viXra:1909.0381 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-19 01:39:59

Heart Contractions and Deformations

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

Research from the University of Göttingen in Germany suggests existing data from ultrasound imaging can be used to work backwards to reconstruct the underlying electrical causes of arrhythmias. [37] A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue-an area with many potential applications in the medical field. [36] The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. [35] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28]
Category: Physics of Biology

[32] viXra:1909.0380 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-19 02:49:29

Miniaturizing Medical Imaging

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Scientists in Christine Hendon's and Michal Lipson's research groups at Columbia University, New York, have used a microchip to map the back of the eye for disease diagnosis. [38] Research from the University of Göttingen in Germany suggests existing data from ultrasound imaging can be used to work backwards to reconstruct the underlying electrical causes of arrhythmias. [37] A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue-an area with many potential applications in the medical field. [36] The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. [35] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29]
Category: Physics of Biology

[31] viXra:1909.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-19 03:00:23

Ultrasound Medical Applications

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

A new ultrasound technique provides a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale. Researchers hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment. [39] Scientists in Christine Hendon's and Michal Lipson's research groups at Columbia University, New York, have used a microchip to map the back of the eye for disease diagnosis. [38] Research from the University of Göttingen in Germany suggests existing data from ultrasound imaging can be used to work backwards to reconstruct the underlying electrical causes of arrhythmias. [37] A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue-an area with many potential applications in the medical field. [36] The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. [35] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[30] viXra:1909.0350 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-16 12:25:42

Mysteries of Brain Organization

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. [35] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[29] viXra:1909.0327 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-15 09:13:05

A Generic Disease Cure Using T-Cells

Authors: Domenico Oricchio
Comments: 1 Page.

I hypothesize a cure of a generic diseases using the sequencing of a single T-cell of an group of elite disease controllers
Category: Physics of Biology

[28] viXra:1909.0274 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-12 07:26:20

Subjective Evolution

Authors: A.V. Kaminsky
Comments: 25 Pages. In Russian

In this essay, I question the sufficiency of the modern physical picture to explain not only the origin of life, but even to explain the evolution of the non-alive matter. My plan in this paper is to fill this gap, by providing a new look at the quantum mechanics.
Category: Physics of Biology

[27] viXra:1909.0266 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-12 13:09:29

Hydrogel Repair Heart in Humans

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

The team is planning a larger, randomized trial that will evaluate how effectively VentriGel can improve cardiac function and quality-of-life for patients experiencing heart failure. [22] Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command-simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. [21] Researchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. [20] A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so they will be more effective at reaching their target. [19] It's called gene editing, and University of Alberta researchers have just published a game-changing study that promises to bring the technology much closer to therapeutic reality. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12]
Category: Physics of Biology

[26] viXra:1909.0257 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 11:37:55

Storing Information in DNA

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa and the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya have demonstrated a significant improvement in the efficiency of the process needed to store digital information in DNA. [18] Globally, biodiversity is concentrated around the equator, but the scientific institutions generating DNA sequence data to study that biodiversity tend to be clustered in developed countries toward the poles. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11] Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8]
Category: Physics of Biology

[25] viXra:1909.0248 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-10 08:18:29

Nanotherapy Fight Cancer Stem Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

The group of NanoBiotechnology at IMDEA Nanociencia, led by Prof. Álvaro Somoza, has used gold nanoclusters coated with albumin to facilitate the attachment of two active molecules for the treatment of breast cancer. [37] Microtubules are protein polymers that assemble into dynamic structures, essential for cell division, shape, motility, and transport of intracellular cargos. [36] Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have addressed many of those problems by packing a gene-editing payload into a tiny customizable, synthetic nanocapsule. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[24] viXra:1909.0224 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 01:41:38

Reconfigurable Electronics Wearable

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Medical implants of the future may feature reconfigurable electronic platforms that can morph in shape and size dynamically as bodies change or transform to relocate from one area to monitor another within our bodies. [40] Researchers at Nanjing University in China have now made the first nanopore sensor that works optically and does not require any electrical connections. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37]
Category: Physics of Biology

[23] viXra:1909.0217 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 05:40:41

PET/CT-Guided Chemoradiotherapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Lead author Tom Konert of the Netherlands Cancer Institute and co-authors reported that interim findings showed much better outcomes for the prospectively-enrolled patients, even though they had more advanced NSCLC. [38] The group of NanoBiotechnology at IMDEA Nanociencia, led by Prof. Álvaro Somoza, has used gold nanoclusters coated with albumin to facilitate the attachment of two active molecules for the treatment of breast cancer. [37] Microtubules are protein polymers that assemble into dynamic structures, essential for cell division, shape, motility, and transport of intracellular cargos. [36] Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have addressed many of those problems by packing a gene-editing payload into a tiny customizable, synthetic nanocapsule. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[22] viXra:1909.0211 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 10:09:54

Nanoribbons Framework

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

The nanostructure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) plays an important role in various applications since different nanostructures usually exhibit different properties and functions. [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids-a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation-capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[21] viXra:1909.0209 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 10:45:25

Metal Flecks for Cancer Therapies

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies. [34] The researchers aim to develop an endoscope-compatible fibre-optic probe that combines diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. [33] Automated radiotherapy planning is a boon for medical physicists and dosimetrists, radiotherapy departments, and patients themselves – according to a team at Cone Health Cancer Center
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1909.0208 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 11:17:23

Tiny Capsules Gene Therapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have addressed many of those problems by packing a gene-editing payload into a tiny customizable, synthetic nanocapsule. [35] Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies. [34] The researchers aim to develop an endoscope-compatible fibre-optic probe that combines diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1909.0207 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 11:35:25

Interferometric Single-Molecule Microscopy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

In a study published online in Nature Methods, Prof. Xu Tao and Prof. Ji Wei from the Institute of Biophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new interferometric single-molecule localization microscopy process with fast modulated structured illumination, called Repetitive Optical Selective Exposure (ROSE). [33] However, a discovery published in the journal Science by Professor Nikolay Zheludev and Dr. Guanghui Yuan at NTU's School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences describes a new optical method that can measure displacements of a nanometer—the smallest distance ever directly measured, using near infrared light. [32] Compact quantum devices could be incorporated into laptops and mobile phones, thanks in part to small devices called quantum optical micro-combs. [31] Taking their name from an intricate Japanese basket pattern, kagome magnets are thought to have electronic properties that could be valuable for future quantum devices and applications. [30] A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can operate as a quantum memory device. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing,
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1909.0205 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 12:46:47

Phytoplankton Gene Technology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

In the doctoral dissertation under review at the University of Jyväskylä, a new gene technology was developed to replace the laborious microscopic identification of small phytoplankton species. [34] The nanostructure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) plays an important role in various applications since different nanostructures usually exhibit different properties and functions. [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids-a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation-capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1909.0204 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 13:03:55

Attack of Predatory Bacteria

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Scientists have unraveled the attack initiation mechanism used by so-called "predatory bacteria', which are capable of invading and killing harmful bugs including E. coli or Salmonella. [35] In the doctoral dissertation under review at the University of Jyväskylä, a new gene technology was developed to replace the laborious microscopic identification of small phytoplankton species. [34] The nanostructure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) plays an important role in various applications since different nanostructures usually exhibit different properties and functions. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1909.0203 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 13:25:42

Microtubules Plus and Minus

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

Microtubules are protein polymers that assemble into dynamic structures, essential for cell division, shape, motility, and transport of intracellular cargos. [36] Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have addressed many of those problems by packing a gene-editing payload into a tiny customizable, synthetic nanocapsule. [35] Tiny extracts of a precious metal used widely in industry could play a vital role in new cancer therapies. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1909.0183 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 09:44:40

Plants Enzyme Medicines

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

These reactions lead to a host of activities in plants, including converting primary metabolites like phenylalanine and tyrosine into vital specialized molecules called flavonoids. [26] Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. [25] Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans-and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. [24] How did life arise on Earth? Rutgers researchers have found among the first and perhaps only hard evidence that simple protein catalysts-essential for cells, the building blocks of life, to function-may have existed when life began. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21] Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. [20] A microscopic thread of DNA evidence in a public genealogy database led California authorities to declare this spring they had caught the Golden State Killer, the rapist and murderer who had eluded authorities for decades. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1909.0181 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 10:52:42

Unique Inside into Cells and Tissues

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

The development of mass spectrometry (MS) methods—those which define the chemical composition of cells—represent a further milestone for research in the field of cell biology. [27] These reactions lead to a host of activities in plants, including converting primary metabolites like phenylalanine and tyrosine into vital specialized molecules called flavonoids. [26] Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1909.0180 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 11:26:25

Polymers from Fragrant Molecules

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

A way of making organic polymers from the fragrant molecules in conifers and fruit trees has been developed by scientists at the University of Birmingham. [28] The development of mass spectrometry (MS) methods—those which define the chemical composition of cells—represent a further milestone for research in the field of cell biology. [27] These reactions lead to a host of activities in plants, including converting primary metabolites like phenylalanine and tyrosine into vital specialized molecules called flavonoids. [26] Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1909.0179 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 11:43:03

Hydrogen Peroxide Production Cleaning

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

The most common process for making hydrogen peroxide begins with a highly toxic, flammable working solution that is combined with hydrogen, filtered, combined with oxygen, mixed in water, and then concentrated to extremely high levels for shipping. [29] A way of making organic polymers from the fragrant molecules in conifers and fruit trees has been developed by scientists at the University of Birmingham. [28] The development of mass spectrometry (MS) methods-those which define the chemical composition of cells-represent a further milestone for research in the field of cell biology. [27] These reactions lead to a host of activities in plants, including converting primary metabolites like phenylalanine and tyrosine into vital specialized molecules called flavonoids. [26] Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. [25] Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans-and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. [24] How did life arise on Earth? Rutgers researchers have found among the first and perhaps only hard evidence that simple protein catalysts-essential for cells, the building blocks of life, to function-may have existed when life began. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1909.0166 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 04:54:56

Monitor Cancer in Treatment Process

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

The researchers aim to develop an endoscope-compatible fibre-optic probe that combines diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. [33] Automated radiotherapy planning is a boon for medical physicists and dosimetrists, radiotherapy departments, and patients themselves-according to a team at Cone Health Cancer Center. [32] Proton CT is proposed as an alternative to X-ray CT for acquiring relative stopping power (RSP) maps for use in proton treatment planning. [31] Since protons were first used to treat hospital cancer patients in the early 1990s, around 100 000 people have benefited from this alternative form of radiation therapy. [30] Researchers have moved closer to the real-time verification of hadron therapy, demonstrating the in vivo accuracy of simulations that predict particle range in the patient. [29] A biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers. [28] Sunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1909.0159 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 08:34:37

Nanoparticles Reduce Tumors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Another collaborative project from a nanoparticles expert at The University of Texas at Arlington has yielded promising results in the search for more effective, targeted cancer treatments. [33] Automated radiotherapy planning is a boon for medical physicists and dosimetrists, radiotherapy departments, and patients themselves-according to a team at Cone Health Cancer Center. [32] Proton CT is proposed as an alternative to X-ray CT for acquiring relative stopping power (RSP) maps for use in proton treatment planning. [31] Since protons were first used to treat hospital cancer patients in the early 1990s, around 100 000 people have benefited from this alternative form of radiation therapy. [30] Researchers have moved closer to the real-time verification of hadron therapy, demonstrating the in vivo accuracy of simulations that predict particle range in the patient. [29] A biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers. [28] Sunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1909.0123 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 01:38:32

Proton CT or X-Ray CT

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Proton CT is proposed as an alternative to X-ray CT for acquiring relative stopping power (RSP) maps for use in proton treatment planning. [31] Since protons were first used to treat hospital cancer patients in the early 1990s, around 100 000 people have benefited from this alternative form of radiation therapy. [30] Researchers have moved closer to the real-time verification of hadron therapy, demonstrating the in vivo accuracy of simulations that predict particle range in the patient. [29] A biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers. [28] Sunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1909.0121 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 03:49:41

Automated Radiotherapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Automated radiotherapy planning is a boon for medical physicists and dosimetrists, radiotherapy departments, and patients themselves-according to a team at Cone Health Cancer Center. [32] Proton CT is proposed as an alternative to X-ray CT for acquiring relative stopping power (RSP) maps for use in proton treatment planning. [31] Since protons were first used to treat hospital cancer patients in the early 1990s, around 100 000 people have benefited from this alternative form of radiation therapy. [30] Researchers have moved closer to the real-time verification of hadron therapy, demonstrating the in vivo accuracy of simulations that predict particle range in the patient. [29] A biomimetic nanosystem can deliver therapeutic proteins to selectively target cancerous tumors, according to a team of Penn State researchers. [28] Sunlight is essential for all life, and living organisms have evolved to sense and respond to light. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1909.0087 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-04 09:19:39

Heart Cells Nanovolcanoes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

Researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern have developed a groundbreaking method for studying the electrical signals of cardiac muscle cells. [22] Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command-simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. [21] Researchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. [20] A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so they will be more effective at reaching their target. [19] It's called gene editing, and University of Alberta researchers have just published a game-changing study that promises to bring the technology much closer to therapeutic reality. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1909.0086 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-04 09:35:03

Proteins with Magnetic Tweezers

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

Physicists at LMU have developed a highly sensitive method for measuring the mechanical stability of protein conformations, and used it to monitor the early steps in the formation of blood clots. [23] Researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern have developed a groundbreaking method for studying the electrical signals of cardiac muscle cells. [22] Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command-simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. [21] Researchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1909.0084 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-04 10:11:15

Biodegradable Anti-Cancer Micro-Robot

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Professor Hongsoo Choi's research team in the Department of Robotics Engineering & DGIST-ETH Microrobot Research Center (DEMRC) at DGIST (President Young Kuk) succeeded in developing a biodegradable micro-robot that can perform hyperthermia treatment and control drug release. [24] Physicists at LMU have developed a highly sensitive method for measuring the mechanical stability of protein conformations, and used it to monitor the early steps in the formation of blood clots. [23] Researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern have developed a groundbreaking method for studying the electrical signals of cardiac muscle cells. [22] Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command-simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. [21] Researchers at Houston Methodist and Rice University have made a discovery that will impact the design of not only drug delivery systems, but also the development of newer applications in water filtration and energy production. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1909.0070 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-03 09:08:10

Machines Move Your Genes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

By combining theory and experiment, researchers have discovered the surprising way one of these machines, called the spindle, avoids slowdowns: congestion. [20] Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are now able to see greater details of DNA origami nanostructures, which will lead to a greater understanding and control of their assembly for future applications. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18] DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. [17]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1909.0068 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-03 09:56:01

Smartphone Fluorescence Microscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Researchers in the U.S. and China have developed a method to transform a smartphone into a fluorescence microscope. [29] Using an affordable, portable device that attaches to a smartphone, a University of Arizona researcher and his collaborators hope to save lives in rural Africa. [28] A team of researchers from the School of Physics at the University of St Andrews have developed tiny lasers that could revolutionise our understanding and treatment of many diseases, including cancer. [27] Scientist have cast new light on the behaviour of tiny hair-like structures called cilia found on almost every cell in the body. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/free+energy/" free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1909.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-03 23:46:00

Potassium Channel Origami Windmill Model

Authors: Sun Zuodong
Comments: 4 Pages.

The potassium channel model proposed in this paper is an independent functional unit, four α-helixs rotate synchronously in one direction, it transports K+ passively and unilaterally and has no dependence on ATP, that is different from previous models such as "paddle model" "propeller model " and "revolving door model ". Its mechanism is that K+ and the positively charged amino acids inα-helixs form a repulsive force, which pushes the "blade" back and makes the "windmill" rotate. The aperture size of K+ channel varies with the speed of windmill. This determines the "opening" and "closing" of channel holes. The model of "origami windmill" reveals the mechanism of K+ channel operation by applying the principles of cell biophysics. This has enlightening significance for other basic research related to it. Perhaps, this will help answer the basic biological questions of human health and disease from the source.
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1909.0042 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-02 10:07:31

DNA Origami Nanostructures

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are now able to see greater details of DNA origami nanostructures, which will lead to a greater understanding and control of their assembly for future applications. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18] DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16]
Category: Physics of Biology