Mind Science

1707 Submissions

[11] viXra:1707.0397 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-30 05:45:31

Information into Conscious Thought

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

A new study investigates when the 'a-ha!' moment takes place in the brain, and how similar it is to other brain processes. [28] Researchers discover both the structure of specific brain areas and memory are linked to genetic activity that also play important roles in immune system function. [27] The inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. [26] But now there is a technology that enables us to "read the mind" with growing accuracy: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). [25] Advances in microscopy techniques have often triggered important discoveries in the field of neuroscience, enabling vital insights in understanding the brain and promising new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [24] What is the relationship of consciousness to the neurological activity of the brain? Does the brain behave differently when a person is fully conscious, when they are asleep, or when they are undergoing an epileptic seizure? [23] Consciousness appears to arise naturally as a result of a brain maximizing its information content. So says a group of scientists in Canada and France, which has studied how the electrical activity in people's brains varies according to individuals' conscious states. The researchers find that normal waking states are associated with maximum values of what they call a brain's "entropy". [22]
Category: Mind Science

[10] viXra:1707.0390 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-30 04:06:20

Immune System, Memory and Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Researchers discover both the structure of specific brain areas and memory are linked to genetic activity that also play important roles in immune system function. [27] The inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. [26] But now there is a technology that enables us to "read the mind" with growing accuracy: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). [25] Advances in microscopy techniques have often triggered important discoveries in the field of neuroscience, enabling vital insights in understanding the brain and promising new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [24] What is the relationship of consciousness to the neurological activity of the brain? Does the brain behave differently when a person is fully conscious, when they are asleep, or when they are undergoing an epileptic seizure? [23] Consciousness appears to arise naturally as a result of a brain maximizing its information content. So says a group of scientists in Canada and France, which has studied how the electrical activity in people's brains varies according to individuals' conscious states. The researchers find that normal waking states are associated with maximum values of what they call a brain's "entropy". [22]
Category: Mind Science

[9] viXra:1707.0368 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-27 14:29:20

Lab-Created Mini-Brains

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Scientists can now explore in a laboratory dish how the human brain develops by creating organoids—distinct, three-dimensional regions of the brain. [27] The inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. [26] But now there is a technology that enables us to "read the mind" with growing accuracy: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). [25] Advances in microscopy techniques have often triggered important discoveries in the field of neuroscience, enabling vital insights in understanding the brain and promising new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [24] What is the relationship of consciousness to the neurological activity of the brain? Does the brain behave differently when a person is fully conscious, when they are asleep, or when they are undergoing an epileptic seizure? [23] Consciousness appears to arise naturally as a result of a brain maximizing its information content. So says a group of scientists in Canada and France, which has studied how the electrical activity in people's brains varies according to individuals' conscious states. The researchers find that normal waking states are associated with maximum values of what they call a brain's "entropy". [22]
Category: Mind Science

[8] viXra:1707.0361 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-27 07:54:30

Light into the Human Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

The inner workings of the human brain have always been a subject of great interest. Unfortunately, it is fairly difficult to view brain structures or intricate tissues due to the fact that the skull is not transparent by design. [26] But now there is a technology that enables us to "read the mind" with growing accuracy: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). [25] Advances in microscopy techniques have often triggered important discoveries in the field of neuroscience, enabling vital insights in understanding the brain and promising new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [24] What is the relationship of consciousness to the neurological activity of the brain? Does the brain behave differently when a person is fully conscious, when they are asleep, or when they are undergoing an epileptic seizure? [23] Consciousness appears to arise naturally as a result of a brain maximizing its information content. So says a group of scientists in Canada and France, which has studied how the electrical activity in people's brains varies according to individuals' conscious states. The researchers find that normal waking states are associated with maximum values of what they call a brain's "entropy". [22]
Category: Mind Science

[7] viXra:1707.0290 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-22 05:07:01

Computational Psychiatry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Machine learning, data mining, and artificial intelligence are revolutionizing the study and understanding of mental illness. [26] Google recently launched PAIR, an acronym of People + AI Research, in an attempt to increase the utility of AI and improve human to AI interaction. [25] Now, researchers at Google's DeepMind have developed a simple algorithm to handle such reasoning—and it has already beaten humans at a complex image comprehension test. [24] A marimba-playing robot with four arms and eight sticks is writing and playing its own compositions in a lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The pieces are generated using artificial intelligence and deep learning. [23] Now, a team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has developed a new approach to such computations, using light instead of electricity, which they say could vastly improve the speed and efficiency of certain deep learning computations. [22] Physicists have found that the structure of certain types of quantum learning algorithms is very similar to their classical counterparts—a finding that will help scientists further develop the quantum versions. [21] We should remain optimistic that quantum computing and AI will continue to improve our lives, but we also should continue to hold companies, organizations, and governments accountable for how our private data is used, as well as the technology's impact on the environment. [20] It's man vs machine this week as Google's artificial intelligence programme AlphaGo faces the world's top-ranked Go player in a contest expected to end in another victory for rapid advances in AI. [19] Google's computer programs are gaining a better understanding of the world, and now it wants them to handle more of the decision-making for the billions of people who use its services. [18] Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled new tools intended to democratize artificial intelligence by enabling machine smarts to be built into software from smartphone games to factory floors. [17] The closer we can get a machine translation to be on par with expert human translation, the happier lots of people struggling with translations will be. [16]
Category: Mind Science

[6] viXra:1707.0285 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-21 09:04:54

Brain's GPS

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

University of Munich neurobiologists present a new theory for the origin of the grid cells required for spatial orientation in the mammalian brain, which assigns a vital role to the timing of trains of signals they receive from neurons called place cells. [30] During the last decade, commercial brain-training programs have risen in popularity, offering people the hope of improving their cognitive abilities through the routine performance of various "brain games" that tap cognitive functions such as memory, attention and cognitive flexibility. [29] The human brain is smaller than most people imagine, it can be held in one hand and weighs about 3 pounds. However, the innocuous looking gray matter is infinitely complex and barely understood. But part of the challenge to understanding, despite the number of researchers, scientists, and doctors dedicated to its study, is that there is no central hub of information, mapping, or data gathering for brain research. Soon though, the Human Brain Project (HBP) hopes to change all that. [28] Many universities and institutes suggested that inside microtubules of brain cells, quantum vibrational computations were orchestrated. [27] New research proposes a way to test whether quantum entanglement is affected by consciousness. [26] Using atomic-scale quantum defects in diamonds known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers to detect the magnetic field generated by neural signals, scientists working in the lab of Ronald Walsworth, a faculty member in Harvard's Center for Brain Science and Physics Department, demonstrated a noninvasive technique that can image the activity of neurons. [25] Neuroscience and artificial intelligence experts from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have taken inspiration from the human brain in creating a new "deep learning" method that enables computers to learn about the visual world largely on their own, much as human babies do. [24]
Category: Mind Science

[5] viXra:1707.0219 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-16 10:14:52

Brain Training on Decision-Making

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

During the last decade, commercial brain-training programs have risen in popularity, offering people the hope of improving their cognitive abilities through the routine performance of various "brain games" that tap cognitive functions such as memory, attention and cognitive flexibility. [29] The human brain is smaller than most people imagine, it can be held in one hand and weighs about 3 pounds. However, the innocuous looking gray matter is infinitely complex and barely understood. But part of the challenge to understanding, despite the number of researchers, scientists, and doctors dedicated to its study, is that there is no central hub of information, mapping, or data gathering for brain research. Soon though, the Human Brain Project (HBP) hopes to change all that. [28] Many universities and institutes suggested that inside microtubules of brain cells, quantum vibrational computations were orchestrated. [27] New research proposes a way to test whether quantum entanglement is affected by consciousness. [26] Using atomic-scale quantum defects in diamonds known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers to detect the magnetic field generated by neural signals, scientists working in the lab of Ronald Walsworth, a faculty member in Harvard's Center for Brain Science and Physics Department, demonstrated a noninvasive technique that can image the activity of neurons. [25] Neuroscience and artificial intelligence experts from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have taken inspiration from the human brain in creating a new "deep learning" method that enables computers to learn about the visual world largely on their own, much as human babies do. [24]
Category: Mind Science

[4] viXra:1707.0161 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-11 12:35:27

Information Compression Via the Matching and Unification of Patterns as a Unifying Principle in the Workings of Brains and Nervous Systems

Authors: J Gerard Wolff
Comments: 38 Pages.

This paper presents evidence for the idea that much of the workings of brains and nervous systems may be understood as compression of information via the matching and unification of patterns. Information compression can mean selective advantage for any creature: in the efficient storage and transmission of information; and, owing to the close connection between information compression and concepts of prediction and probability, in the making of predictions about where food may be found, potential dangers, and so on. Several aspects of our everyday perceptions and thinking may be seen as information compression. For example, many words in natural languages may be seen as relatively short identifiers or ``codes'' for relatively complex concepts. When viewing the world with two eyes, we see one view, not two. Random-dot stereograms provide confirmation that, in binocular vision, we do indeed merge information from our two eyes and thus compress it. Information compression may be seen in the workings of sensory units in the eye of "Limulus", the horseshoe crab. Computer models demonstrate how information compression may be a key to the unsupervised discovery of grammars for natural language, including segmental structures (words and phrases), classes of structure, and abstract patterns. Information compression may be seen in the perceptual "constancies", including size constancy, lightness constancy, and colour constancy. Mathematics, which is a product of the human intellect, may be seen to be a set of techniques for the compression of information, and their application. The "SP theory of intelligence" provides evidence for the importance of information compression in several aspects of human intelligence. Four objections to the main thesis of this paper are described, with answers to those objections.
Category: Mind Science

[3] viXra:1707.0123 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-09 10:32:40

Human Brain Project

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

The human brain is smaller than most people imagine, it can be held in one hand and weighs about 3 pounds. However, the innocuous looking gray matter is infinitely complex and barely understood. But part of the challenge to understanding, despite the number of researchers, scientists, and doctors dedicated to its study, is that there is no central hub of information, mapping, or data gathering for brain research. Soon though, the Human Brain Project (HBP) hopes to change all that. [28] Many universities and institutes suggested that inside microtubules of brain cells, quantum vibrational computations were orchestrated. [27] New research proposes a way to test whether quantum entanglement is affected by consciousness. [26] Using atomic-scale quantum defects in diamonds known as nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers to detect the magnetic field generated by neural signals, scientists working in the lab of Ronald Walsworth, a faculty member in Harvard's Center for Brain Science and Physics Department, demonstrated a noninvasive technique that can image the activity of neurons. [25] Neuroscience and artificial intelligence experts from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have taken inspiration from the human brain in creating a new "deep learning" method that enables computers to learn about the visual world largely on their own, much as human babies do. [24]
Category: Mind Science

[2] viXra:1707.0122 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-09 05:22:24

Peters & TOZZI’S Scientific Results: an Overview

Authors: Arturo Tozzi, James F Peters
Comments: 5 Pages.

This short manuscript summarizes the framework developed by Tozzi and Peters in the years 2015-2017. We claim that the Borsuk-Ulam Theorem (BUT), is not simply a metaphor, rather a real computational tool standing for a universal principle for physical and biological systems. Indeed, the BUT perspective allows a feature (e.g., a shape, a trajectory or an energy) located in the environment to be translated to an abstract space and vice versa. Achieving a map from one system to another enables researchers to assess and elucidate a wide range of phenomena. We provided either demonstrations or testable hypotheses related to the BUT framework in far-flung disciplines, such as neuroscience, theoretical physics, nanomaterials, computational topology, applied algebraic topology, philosophy of the mind, chaotic systems, group theory and cosmology. We collaborated with foremost scientists from Canada, China, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, United Kingdom, U.S.A.
Category: Mind Science

[1] viXra:1707.0039 [pdf] submitted on 2017-07-03 10:19:49

Toward a Systemic View for Plant Learning: an (Eco)physiological Perspective.

Authors: Gustavo M. Souza, Gabriel R. A. Toledo, Gustavo F. R. Saraiva
Comments: 43 Pages.

Herein, we have proposed a concept of plant learning based on some principles of systemic plant ecophysiology. In order to accomplish this task, a framework consisting in basic epistemological assumptions is offered, as well as a cognitive context that underpins the perspective of learning. Accordingly, a number of empirical studies are quoted to illustrate the basic idea presented herein.
Category: Mind Science