High Energy Particle Physics

   

Gravity’s Hidden Inverse Relationship With Electromagnetism: A Possible Path to Solving the Hierarchy Problem

Authors: Lamont Williams

The hierarchy problem — the problem of why gravity is far weaker than electromagnetism — is one of the greatest problems in physics. In this study, it is hypothesized that the disparity between the forces stems from their having an inverse, or seesaw-like, relationship — with one strength value naturally being high when the other value is low. In accordance with this seesaw-like relationship, it is further hypothesized that, as energy is increased, the strength of electromagnetism falls while the strength of gravity rises. The author suggests that theory and observation indicating a rise in electromagnetic strength with increasing energy are not accounting for gravity’s contribution to the calculated and measured coupling. It is shown that removing this contribution exposes the inverse relationship between the forces and, importantly, the lowering of electromagnetism’s strength over the increasing energy levels. Taken together, the concepts presented here may help in solving the hierarchy problem. This, in turn, may point the way to combining gravity and electromagnetism into a single framework and ultimately unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics.

Comments: 19 Pages.

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Submission history

[v1] 2017-01-29 11:15:37

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