High Energy Particle Physics

   

The Witte Effect: The Neutrino Speed and The Anisotropy of the Light Speed, as Defined in the General Theory of Relativity

Authors: Policarpo Yoshin Ulianov

In 1991, R. D. Witte performed an experiment to observe phase drift between two clusters of atomic clocks linked by a coaxial cable. Surprisingly, data from Witte observations showed cyclical phase drift variation with a periodicity very close to one sidereal day, in a phenomenon which along the present paper will be called “Witte effect”. Witte’s data were not accepted for publication, because they seemed to contradict the Einstein’s Special Relativity Theory. The Witte effect was thus ignored by the prevailing scientific paradigm until 2006, when R. T. Cahill found that the results by the Witte experiment were correct and could be explainable in the context of general relativity, due to an anisotropy in the speed of light that arises from the interaction between gravitational fields. Initially, Witte effect happens regardless the kind of signal is used to link the atomic clocks, be it RF (as used by Witte himself), light pulses or even bursts of neutrinos. Associating the OPERA experiment to the one by Witte (theoretically or linking the OPERA clocks with a coaxial cable), initially it will be observed phase drifts that vary according to the sidereal time when the experiment is being performed, a concern that is not known to have been regarded by the physicists designing the OPERA experiment. In the light of such facts, there are reasons to believe that the Witte effect explains why OPERA’s neutrinos seem to move at speeds above the light speed.

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[v1] 2012-01-04 12:19:01

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