Physics of Biology

   

Sheldrake's Morphic Fields and TGD View about Quantum Biology

Authors: Matti Pitkänen

This article is inspired by the study of two books of Rupert Sheldrake. What makes the study of the books of Sheldrake so rewarding is that Sheldrake starts from problems of the existing paradigm, analyzes them thoroughly, and proposes solutions in the framework provided by his vision. There is no need to accept Sheldrake′s views, just the reading of his arguments teaches a lot about the fundamental ideas and dogmas underlying recent day biology and forces the reader to realize how little we really know - not only about biology but even about so called established areas of physics such as condensed matter physics. These books are precious gems for anyone trying to build overall view.

The idea that Nature would have habits just as we do is probably one of those aspects in Sheldrake's work, which generate most irritation in physicalists believing that Nature is governed by deterministic laws with classical determinism replaced with quantum statistical determinism. Sheldrake is one of those very few scientists able to see the reality rather than only the model of reality. Morphic resonance would make possible to establish the habits of Nature and the past would determine to high extent the present but on organic manner and in totally different sense as in the world of physicalist.

In this article I propose an interpretation for the vision of Sheldrake based on zero energy ontology and TGD based view about geometric time and experienced time forcing to accept the notions of 4-dimensional brain and society. In this framework the problem is to understand why our sensory perception is 3-dimensional whereas the standard problems related to memory disappear since memory corresponds to 4-D aspects of perception and of conscious experience and memory storage is 4-dimensional. The vision about gene expression as something to some extend analogous to a democratic decision of 4-D society looks rather natural in this framework and would explain some still poorly understood aspects of gene expression known from the days of Mendel. Therefore the term ″the prence of the past″ appearing in the title of one of Sheldrake's books has quite a concrete meaning in TGD Universe. This article is inspired by the study of two books of Rupert Sheldrake. What makes the study of the books of Sheldrake so rewarding is that Sheldrake starts from problems of the existing paradigm, analyzes them thoroughly, and proposes solutions in the framework provided by his vision. There is no need to accept Sheldrake′s views, just the reading of his arguments teaches a lot about the fundamental ideas and dogmas underlying recent day biology and forces the reader to realize how little we really know - not only about biology but even about so called established areas of physics such as condensed matter physics. These books are precious gems for anyone trying to build overall view.

The idea that Nature would have habits just as we do is probably one of those aspects in Sheldrake's work, which generate most irritation in physicalists believing that Nature is governed by deterministic laws with classical determinism replaced with quantum statistical determinism. Sheldrake is one of those very few scientists able to see the reality rather than only the model of reality. Morphic resonance would make possible to establish the habits of Nature and the past would determine to high extent the present but on organic manner and in totally different sense as in the world of physicalist.

In this article I propose an interpretation for the vision of Sheldrake based on zero energy ontology and TGD based view about geometric time and experienced time forcing to accept the notions of 4-dimensional brain and society. In this framework the problem is to understand why our sensory perception is 3-dimensional whereas the standard problems related to memory disappear since memory corresponds to 4-D aspects of perception and of conscious experience and memory storage is 4-dimensional. The vision about gene expression as something to some extend analogous to a democratic decision of 4-D society looks rather natural in this framework and would explain some still poorly understood aspects of gene expression known from the days of Mendel. Therefore the term ″the prence of the past″ appearing in the title of one of Sheldrake's books has quite a concrete meaning in TGD Universe.

Comments: 11 Pages.

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Submission history

[v1] 1 Nov 2011
[v2] 2012-01-30 07:27:22

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