Social Science

1211 Submissions

[7] viXra:1211.0123 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-20 22:00:56

Prediction of Skytrax Airline Rankings, Short Formula (2011) (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez
Comments: 10 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Perezgonzalez continued a previous study by Perezgonzalez and Gilbey (2010), attempting to predict Skytrax's 2011 Official World Airline Star rankings from average ratings that passengers had given to those airlines, independently, on Skytrax's website. The regression formula was based on a single variable, the average 'Customer review scoring', which is a cumulative average of past ratings, including those given during 2011.
Category: Social Science

[6] viXra:1211.0114 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-19 14:47:16

Prediction of Skytrax Airport Rankings, Short Formula (2011) (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez
Comments: 5 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Perezgonzalez continued a previous study by Perezgonzalez and Gilbey (2010), attempting to predict Skytrax's 2011 Official World Airport Star rankings from average ratings that passengers had given to those airports, independently, on Skytrax's website. The regression formula was based on a single variable, the average 'Customer review scoring', which is a cumulative average of past ratings, including those given during 2011.
Category: Social Science

[5] viXra:1211.0107 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-18 17:24:14

Misinterpretation of 'p' (2000) (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez [ed]
Comments: 3 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Haller and Krauss (2000) carried out a study on common misinterpretations of tests of significance among German psychology students and academics, which partly replicates one done by Oakes (19863). Haller and Krauss found that most participants held at least one misinterpretation out of six presented. They also found that, overall, 100% of psychology students held one or more misinterpretations (mean=2.5), almost 90% of psychology researchers also held one or more misinterpretations (mean=2), and 80% of instructors of statistics in psychology also held one or more misinterpretations (mean=1.9). The authors thought worrisome the high percentage of instructors with misinterpretations, as these may pass those misinterpretations down to students. Another interesting result, one not highlighted by the authors, though, is the high percentage of researchers (including instructors when carrying out and publishing research) with misinterpretations, as these would perpetuate those when publishing, peer-reviewing others' publications, and making research-informed decisions (such as chairing committees, granting funding, etc).
Category: Social Science

[4] viXra:1211.0091 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-15 21:37:28

Misinterpretation of 'p' (1995) (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez [ed]
Comments: 2 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Falk and Greenbaum (1995) carried out a study on common misinterpretations of the logic of tests of significance among Israeli psychology students, which partly replicates one by Oakes (1986). Typically, most of these misinterpretations confuse p-values (ie, the probability of the data when assuming that the null hypothesis is true) and, especially, statistical significance, with the probability of proving or disproving hypotheses (be this the null hypothesis or an alternative hypothesis). Falk and Greenbaum found that almost 87% of the students held at least one misinterpretation out of the four presented. Most of the students misinterpreted p-values as the probability of the null hypothesis being true.
Category: Social Science

[3] viXra:1211.0087 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-14 18:56:30

Misinterpretation of 'p' (1986) (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez [ed]
Comments: 4 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Oakes (1986) carried out a study on common misinterpretations of the logic of tests of significance among British psychology academics. Typically, most of these misinterpretations confuse p-values (ie, the probability of the data when assuming that the null hypothesis is true) and, especially, statistical significance, with the probability of proving or disproving hypotheses (be this the null hypothesis or an alternative hypothesis). Another misinterpretation is the so-called "replication fallacy", which occurs when the p-value is assumed to represent the probability of finding similar results if the research were to be repeated.
Category: Social Science

[2] viXra:1211.0061 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-11 16:29:35

Prediction of Skytrax Airline Rankings, Short Formula (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez
Comments: 6 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Perezgonzalez and Gilbey (2010) obtained a regression formula for predicting Skytrax's 2010 airline rankings from customer reviews. The research behind the study attempted to predict Skytrax Global Airline Ranking from average ratings that passengers had given to those airlines, independently, on Skytrax's website. The regression formula was based on a single variable (the average 'Customer review scoring').
Category: Social Science

[1] viXra:1211.0045 [pdf] submitted on 2012-11-08 21:44:55

Prediction of Skytrax Airport Rankings, Short Formula (2e)

Authors: Jose D Perezgonzalez
Comments: 3 pages, Journal of Knowledge Advancement & Integration (ISSN 1177-4576), Wiki of Science, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License

Perezgonzalez & Gilbey (2010a) obtained a regression formula for predicting Skytrax's 2010 airport rankings from customer reviews. The research behind the study attempted to predict Skytrax's Official World Airport Star rankings from average ratings that passengers had given to those airports, independently, on Skytrax's website. The regression formula was based on a single variable (the average 'Customer review scoring'), which is a simpler formula to calculate.
Category: Social Science