Quantum Physics

1907 Submissions

[97] viXra:1907.0624 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-31 11:42:08

Quantum and Classical Worlds Connection

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

Fortunately, a quantum system can be described using intuitive classical probabilities rather than the more challenging methods of quantum mechanics, when there is no interference. [48] Physicists from Professor Johannes Fink's research group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have found a way to use a mechanical oscillator to produce entangled radiation. [47] The key to ghost imaging is to use two or more correlated beams of particles. [46] Physicists at the University of Alberta in Canada have developed a new way to build quantum memories, a method for storing delicate quantum information encoded into pulses of light. [45] Now, an Australian research team has experimentally realised a crucial combination of these capabilities on a silicon chip, bringing the dream of a universal quantum computer closer to reality. [44] A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by Professor Guido Burkard and his team of physicists at the University of Konstanz. [43] As the number of hacks and security breaches rapidly climbs, scientists say there may be a way to make a truly unhackable network by using the laws of quantum physics. [42] This world-first nanophotonic device, just unveiled in Nature Communications, encodes more data and processes it much faster than conventional fiber optics by using a special form of 'twisted' light. [41] Purdue University researchers created a new technique that would increase the secret bit rate 100-fold, to over 35 million photons per second. [40] Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems. [39]
Category: Quantum Physics

[96] viXra:1907.0617 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-31 13:30:37

Magic Angle Superconductors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

Now, new experiments conducted at Princeton give hints at how this material-known as magic-angle twisted graphene-gives rise to superconductivity. [33] Finally, we can look at a key property of superconductivity that previously couldn't be seen." [32] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have found that crystals of a recently discovered superconducting material, a layered bismuth chalcogenide with a four-fold symmetric structure, shows only twofold symmetry in its superconductivity. [31] Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity. [30] Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown that copper-based superconductors, or cuprates-the first class of materials found to carry electricity with no loss at relatively high temperatures-contain fluctuating stripes of electron charge and spin that meander like rivulets over rough ground. [29] Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[95] viXra:1907.0611 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-30 08:15:31

Structuring Quantum Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Implementing quantum materials in computer chips provides access to fundamentally new technologies. [26] The achievement represents a major step towards a "quantum internet," in which future computers can rapidly and securely send and receive quantum information. [25] Scientists have used precisely tuned pulses of laser light to film the ultrafast rotation of a molecule. [24] Recently, researchers have been investigating how these quantum fingerprints might one day be used as an inexpensive form of ID to protect users' personal information for technologies in the emerging network of internet-connected devices known as the Internet of Things. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[94] viXra:1907.0601 [pdf] replaced on 2019-08-14 03:00:14

To Catch and Reverse a Quantum Jump Mid-Flight (In Russian)

Authors: Z.K. Minev, S.O. Mundhada, S. Shankar ...
Comments: 28 Pages. in Russian

Quantum physics was invented to account for two fundamental features of measurement results their discreetness and randomness. Emblematic of these features is the Bohr idea of quantum jumps between two discrete energy levels of an atom. Experimentally, quantum jumps were first observed in an atomic ion driven by a weak deterministic force while under strong continuous energy measurement. The times at which the discontinuous jump transitions occur are reputed to be fundamentally unpredictable. Can there be, despite the indeterminism of quantum physics, a possibility to know if a quantum jump is about to occur or not? Here, we answer this question affirmatively by experimentally demonstrating that the jump from the ground to an excited state of a superconducting artificial three-level atom can be tracked as it follows a predictable flight, by monitoring the population of an auxiliary energy level coupled to the ground state. The experimental results demonstrate that the jump evolution when completed is continuous, coherent, and deterministic. Furthermore, exploiting these features and using real-time monitoring and feedback, we catch and reverse a quantum jump mid-flight, thus deterministically preventing its completion. Our results, which agree with theoretical predictions essentially without adjustable parameters, support the modern quantum trajectory theory and provide new ground for the exploration of real-time intervention techniques in the control of quantum systems, such as early detection of error syndromes.
Category: Quantum Physics

[93] viXra:1907.0595 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-31 06:01:43

Model and Method to Explain Correlation in Bell-Test Experiments

Authors: Gerard van der Ham
Comments: 11 Pages.

The correlation in Bell-test experiments in relation to elektronspin can be explained according to local-realism. A simple model shows that the position of the detectors respective of the direction of movement of the elektrons define vektorspaces in which the opposit spinvektors of entangled pairs of elektrons are, which give equal spin result. With this model the identification of those vektorspaces and the measuring and counting of the spinvektors can be described. In this way correlation, as it is calculated in quantum theory and found in experiments, is explained.
Category: Quantum Physics

[92] viXra:1907.0592 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-29 06:45:34

Unique Quantum Fingerprint

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

Recently, researchers have been investigating how these quantum fingerprints might one day be used as an inexpensive form of ID to protect users' personal information for technologies in the emerging network of internet-connected devices known as the Internet of Things. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon-the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy-in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[91] viXra:1907.0591 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-29 07:36:22

Rotating Molecules Film

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

Scientists have used precisely tuned pulses of laser light to film the ultrafast rotation of a molecule. [24] Recently, researchers have been investigating how these quantum fingerprints might one day be used as an inexpensive form of ID to protect users' personal information for technologies in the emerging network of internet-connected devices known as the Internet of Things. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon-the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy-in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[90] viXra:1907.0590 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-29 08:48:02

Quantum Internet at Light Speed

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

The achievement represents a major step towards a "quantum internet," in which future computers can rapidly and securely send and receive quantum information. [25] Scientists have used precisely tuned pulses of laser light to film the ultrafast rotation of a molecule. [24] Recently, researchers have been investigating how these quantum fingerprints might one day be used as an inexpensive form of ID to protect users' personal information for technologies in the emerging network of internet-connected devices known as the Internet of Things. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[89] viXra:1907.0576 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-30 01:14:29

Exotic Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, in collaboration with their colleagues at the University of Hamburg in Germany, have imaged an exotic quantum particle-called a Majorana fermion-that can be used as a building block for future qubits and eventually the realization of quantum computers. [26] The achievement represents a major step towards a "quantum internet," in which future computers can rapidly and securely send and receive quantum information. [25] Scientists have used precisely tuned pulses of laser light to film the ultrafast rotation of a molecule. [24] Recently, researchers have been investigating how these quantum fingerprints might one day be used as an inexpensive form of ID to protect users' personal information for technologies in the emerging network of internet-connected devices known as the Internet of Things. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[88] viXra:1907.0572 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-30 03:32:17

A Formulation of Spin Dynamics Using SCHRÖDINGER Equation

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 17 Pages.

In quantum mechanics, there is a profound distinction between orbital angular momentum and spin angular momentum in which the former can be associated with the motion of a physical object in space but the later cannot. The difference leads to a radical deviation in the formulation of their corresponding dynamics in which an orbital angular momentum can be described by using a coordinate system but a spin angular momentum cannot. In this work we show that it is possible to treat spin angular momentum in the same manner as orbital angular momentum by formulating spin dynamics using Schrödinger equation in an intrinsic coordinate system. As an illustration, we apply the formulation to the dynamics of a hydrogen atom and show that the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the electron can take half-integral values and, in particular, the intrinsic mass of the electron can take negative values. We also consider a further extension by generalising the formulation so that it can be used to describe other intrinsic dynamics that may associate with a quantum particle, such as when a hydrogen atom radiates a photon, the photon associated with the electron may also possess an intrinsic dynamics that can be described by an intrinsic wave equation that has a similar form to that for the electron.
Category: Quantum Physics

[87] viXra:1907.0570 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-30 04:58:46

Color Images from Scattered Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Engineers at Duke University have developed a method for extracting a color image from a single exposure of light scattered through a mostly opaque material. [37] Physicists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, have devised a method to turn a non-magnetic metal into a magnet using laser light. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30] KU Leuven researchers from the Roeffaers Lab and the Hofkens Group have now put forward a very promising direct X-ray detector design, based on a rapidly emerging halide perovskite semiconductor, with chemical formula Cs2AgBiBr6. [29] Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate, thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[86] viXra:1907.0569 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-30 05:24:06

SLAP Microscope Records

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

A new microscope breaks a long-standing speed limit, recording footage of brain activity 15 times faster than scientists once believed possible. [38] Engineers at Duke University have developed a method for extracting a color image from a single exposure of light scattered through a mostly opaque material. [37] Physicists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, have devised a method to turn a non-magnetic metal into a magnet using laser light. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30] KU Leuven researchers from the Roeffaers Lab and the Hofkens Group have now put forward a very promising direct X-ray detector design, based on a rapidly emerging halide perovskite semiconductor, with chemical formula Cs2AgBiBr6. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[85] viXra:1907.0561 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-28 08:53:21

The Charge Conservation Principle and Pair Production

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle
Comments: 2 Pages.

This paper reflects on the charge conservation principle and - more particularly - how it does or doesn't fit in with Wheeler's 'mass without mass' concept.
Category: Quantum Physics

[84] viXra:1907.0541 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-28 01:15:49

Sound Particles with Quantum Microphone

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Stanford physicists have developed a "quantum microphone" so sensitive that it can measure individual particles of sound, called phonons. [39] A team of researchers from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham and Loughborough has discovered a quantum phenomenon that helps to understand the fundamental limits of graphene electronics. [38] The authors suggest the magnetism, called orbital ferromagnetism, could prove useful for certain applications, such as quantum computing. [37] Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics. [36] A DGIST research team discovered a theory that can expand the development of valleytronics technology, which has been drawing attention as a next generation semiconductor technology. [35] To produce the new ultra-thin transistor, calcium fluoride was selected as the insulating material. [34] University of Illinois electrical engineers have cleared another hurdle in high-power semiconductor fabrication by adding the field's hottest material-beta-gallium oxide-to their arsenal. [33] Transistors are tiny switches that form the bedrock of modern computing; billions of them route electrical signals around inside a smartphone, for instance. Quantum computers will need analogous hardware to manipulate quantum information. [32] "The realization of such all-optical single-photon devices will be a large step towards deterministic multi-mode entanglement generation as well as high-fidelity photonic quantum gates that are crucial for all-optical quantum information processing," says Tanji-Suzuki. [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[83] viXra:1907.0530 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-26 09:02:52

Quantum Phenomenon of Graphene

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

A team of researchers from the Universities of Manchester, Nottingham and Loughborough has discovered a quantum phenomenon that helps to understand the fundamental limits of graphene electronics. [38] The authors suggest the magnetism, called orbital ferromagnetism, could prove useful for certain applications, such as quantum computing. [37] Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) have developed a novel method to fine-tune the optoelectrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by applying an aerosolized dopant solution on their surface, thus opening up new avenues for SWCNT application in optoelectronics. [36] A DGIST research team discovered a theory that can expand the development of valleytronics technology, which has been drawing attention as a next generation semiconductor technology. [35] To produce the new ultra-thin transistor, calcium fluoride was selected as the insulating material. [34] University of Illinois electrical engineers have cleared another hurdle in high-power semiconductor fabrication by adding the field's hottest material-beta-gallium oxide-to their arsenal. [33] Transistors are tiny switches that form the bedrock of modern computing; billions of them route electrical signals around inside a smartphone, for instance. Quantum computers will need analogous hardware to manipulate quantum information. [32] "The realization of such all-optical single-photon devices will be a large step towards deterministic multi-mode entanglement generation as well as high-fidelity photonic quantum gates that are crucial for all-optical quantum information processing," says Tanji-Suzuki. [31] Researchers at ETH have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[82] viXra:1907.0502 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-25 06:54:50

Quantum Uncertainty Solve Problem

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg have solved one of the longstanding problems in the field, namely, how a certain symmetry can be restored. [45] Researchers at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have invented an innovative way for different types of quantum technology to "talk" to each other using sound. [44] Quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) is an important branch of quantum communication, based on the principles of quantum mechanics for the direct transmission of classified information. [43] The deluge of cyberattacks sweeping across the world has governments and companies thinking about new ways to protect their digital systems, and the corporate and state secrets stored within. [42] The Pentagon on Friday said there has been a cyber breach of Defense Department travel records that compromised the personal information and credit card data of U.S. military and civilian personnel. [41] Quantum secure direct communication transmits secret information directly without encryption. [40] Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems. [39] Research in the quantum optics lab of Prof. Barak Dayan in the Weizmann Institute of Science may be bringing the development of such computers one step closer by providing the "quantum gates" that are required for communication within and between such quantum computers. [38] Calculations of a quantum system's behavior can spiral out of control when they involve more than a handful of particles. [37] Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have reached a new milestone on the way to optical computing, or the use of light instead of electricity for computing. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[81] viXra:1907.0497 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-25 09:37:48

Lumpy Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Finally, we can look at a key property of superconductivity that previously couldn't be seen." [32] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have found that crystals of a recently discovered superconducting material, a layered bismuth chalcogenide with a four-fold symmetric structure, shows only twofold symmetry in its superconductivity. [31] Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity. [30] Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown that copper-based superconductors, or cuprates-the first class of materials found to carry electricity with no loss at relatively high temperatures-contain fluctuating stripes of electron charge and spin that meander like rivulets over rough ground. [29] Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[80] viXra:1907.0494 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-25 13:31:57

An Algebraic Way of Simultaneously Analyzing Both Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen Paper and Bohr's Reply to it

Authors: N Gurappa
Comments: 5 pages, no figure

In their celebrated paper titled "Can quantum mechanical description of physical reality be considered complete?", Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) showed for the first time the existence of `Spooky action-at-a-distance'. Though the result of their paper is unquestionable, but the conclusion of the same became sensational because of its challenge to quantum mechanical formalism whether it's complete or not in describing the physical reality of Nature. Bohr's physical and philosophical reply to that conclusion justified the completeness of quantum mechanics. Here, a simple algebraic way is presented for the results of these two classic papers in such a way that the actual reason behind why quantum world necessarily exhibits the action-at-a-distance and how Bohr defended against the incompleteness of the quantum formalism will become clear.This approach naturally reveals what physical assumption of EPR went wrong while considering the entangled quantum system and also provides the missing mathematical argument in Bohr's reply.
Category: Quantum Physics

[79] viXra:1907.0490 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-25 20:37:58

An Urdu Translation of the Landmark EPR Article from 1935

Authors: Azhar Iqbal, Pervez Hoodbhoy, Derek Abbott
Comments: 11 Pages.

An Urdu translation of the landmark article by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen from the year 1935 is presented with the hope that it will be of academic and research interest to the readers in that language.
Category: Quantum Physics

[78] viXra:1907.0481 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-26 02:49:15

Multiple Laser Beamlets

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A research team led by Osaka University showed how multiple overlapping laser beams are better at accelerating electrons to incredibly fast speeds, as compared with a single laser. [35] In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[77] viXra:1907.0480 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-26 03:19:34

Terahertz Imaging Technique

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

A new terahertz imaging technique could help slow the spread of these infestations by detecting insect damage inside wood before it becomes visible on the outside. [36] A research team led by Osaka University showed how multiple overlapping laser beams are better at accelerating electrons to incredibly fast speeds, as compared with a single laser. [35] In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[76] viXra:1907.0475 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-24 08:48:42

The Oscillator Model, Excited States, and Electron-Photon Interactions

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle
Comments: 10 Pages.

This paper explores the implications of the electron oscillator model in regard to the concept of an excited state and the way we think about electron-photon interactions (electron-photon scattering). We also offer some reflections if we can apply the model to a nucleon (a proton or a neutron).
Category: Quantum Physics

[75] viXra:1907.0468 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-24 12:19:31

Refutation of Pre-Measurement, Decoherence, and Multiverse Quantum Mechanics

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2016-2019 by Colin James III All rights reserved. Updated abstract at ersatz-systems.com; email: info@cec-services . com

The equation for pre-measurement is not tautologous, thereby refuting it and decoherence as a basis for multiverse quantum mechanics. These form a non tautologous fragment of the universal logic VŁ4.
Category: Quantum Physics

[74] viXra:1907.0461 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-25 02:24:17

Tiny Laser for New Sensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

In a major step toward developing portable scanners that can rapidly measure molecules in pharmaceuticals or classify tissue in patients' skin, researchers have created an imaging system that uses lasers small and efficient enough to fit on a microchip. [34] A new study, "Wavelength-encoded laser particles for massively multiplexed cell tagging," by scientists in the Wellman Center for Photomedicine has been published in Nature Photonics. [33] "This is just a wonderful example of the unexpected ways projects can develop when a team of diverse scientists from around the world come together to try and understand new and interesting phenomena," said team member Jim Cleaves, also of ELSI. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[73] viXra:1907.0448 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-23 08:51:48

Bell's Correlation Formula and Anomalous Spin

Authors: Han Geurdes; Koji Nagata
Comments: 7 Pages.

In this paper it is demonstrated that a hidden spin component may exist that in local hidden variables, but quantum manner, invalidates the nonlocality analysis with e.g. inequalities such as CHSH.
Category: Quantum Physics

[72] viXra:1907.0446 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-23 09:07:28

Quantum Communication Message

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Quantum Communication Message Counter to intuition, in a new counterfactual communication protocol published in NPJ Quantum Information, scientists from the University of Vienna, the University of Cambridge and the MIT have experimentally demonstrated that in quantum mechanics this is not always true, thereby contradicting a crucial premise of communication theory. [41] One of these particles of light has the potential to serve as a carrier of the fragile quantum information, the other, as a messenger to provide prior notification of its twin. [40] Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems. [39] Research in the quantum optics lab of Prof. Barak Dayan in the Weizmann Institute of Science may be bringing the development of such computers one step closer by providing the "quantum gates" that are required for communication within and between such quantum computers. [38] Calculations of a quantum system's behavior can spiral out of control when they involve more than a handful of particles. [37] Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have reached a new milestone on the way to optical computing, or the use of light instead of electricity for computing. [36] The key technical novelty of this work is the creation of semantic embeddings out of structured event data. [35] The researchers have focussed on a complex quantum property known as entanglement, which is a vital ingredient in the quest to protect sensitive data. [34] Cryptography is a science of data encryption providing its confidentiality and integrity. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[71] viXra:1907.0444 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-23 13:50:26

Light Through Semiconductor Crystal

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

In every modern microcircuit hidden inside a laptop or smartphone, you can see transistors-small semiconductor devices that control the flow of electric current, i.e. the flow of electrons. [42] Counter to intuition, in a new counterfactual communication protocol published in NPJ Quantum Information, scientists from the University of Vienna, the University of Cambridge and the MIT have experimentally demonstrated that in quantum mechanics this is not always true, thereby contradicting a crucial premise of communication theory. [41] One of these particles of light has the potential to serve as a carrier of the fragile quantum information, the other, as a messenger to provide prior notification of its twin. [40] Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems. [39] Research in the quantum optics lab of Prof. Barak Dayan in the Weizmann Institute of Science may be bringing the development of such computers one step closer by providing the "quantum gates" that are required for communication within and between such quantum computers. [38] Calculations of a quantum system's behavior can spiral out of control when they involve more than a handful of particles. [37] Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have reached a new milestone on the way to optical computing, or the use of light instead of electricity for computing. [36] The key technical novelty of this work is the creation of semantic embeddings out of structured event data. [35] The researchers have focussed on a complex quantum property known as entanglement, which is a vital ingredient in the quest to protect sensitive data. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[70] viXra:1907.0440 [pdf] replaced on 2019-08-02 16:02:16

All About Mass and Gravitation

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 14 Pages.

Gravitation and mass are explained by the fact that spherical pulse responses locally and temporarily deform the embedding field. Over time the spherical pulse response integrates into the Green’s function of the field. The shape of the Green’s function resembles the shape of the gravitation potential of point-like masses. At large enough distance an ensemble of massive objects acts as a single point-like mass. These ingredients explain how gravity works. The mass has a significance of its own and can characterize discrepant regions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[69] viXra:1907.0432 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-24 05:14:50

Acoustic Waves in 2-D Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 33 Pages.

Researchers at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems (PCS), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), and colleagues have reported a novel phenomenon, called Valley Acoustoelectric Effect, which takes place in 2-D materials, similar to graphene. [24] University College Cork (UCC) & University of Oxford Professor of Physics, Séamus Davis, has led a team of experimental physicists in the discovery of the magnetic noise generated by a fluid of magnetic monopoles. [23] There are two sound velocities in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In addition to the normal sound propagation there is second sound, which is a quantum phenomenon. [22] Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20] Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. [19] A team of researchers with members from IBM Research-Zurich and RWTH Aachen University has announced the development of a new PCM (phase change memory) design that offers miniaturized memory cell volume down to three nanometers. [18] Monatomic glassy antimony might be used as a new type of single-element phase change memory. [17] Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[68] viXra:1907.0428 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-22 06:34:28

On Wave Function Collapse in Quantum Mechanics in the Case of a Spin System Having Three Anticommuting Operators: the Reason Because it is so Difficult to Realize a Theory of Collapse in Quantum Mechanics

Authors: Elio Conte
Comments: 10 Pages.

We use a two states quantum spin system S, and thus considering the particular case of three anticommuting elements and the measurement of . We evidence that, during the wave collapse, we have a transition of standard commutation relation of the spin to new commutation relations and this occurs during the interaction of the S system with the macroscopic measurement system M. The reason to accept such view point is that it causes the destruction of the interferential factors and of the fermion creation and annihilation operators of the S system without recourse to further elaborations based on the use of Hamiltonians or other methods. By this formulation we propose a new method in attempting to solve the problem of wave function collapse. The concept of Observable , in use in standard quantum mechanics, is resolved in an abstract entity to which is connected a linear hermitean operator that signs mathematically the operation that we must perform on the wave function in order to obtain the potential and possible values of the observable. It does not commute with a number of other operators characterizing the system and the non commuting rules have a fundamental role in quantum mechanics .They have a logic that must be analyzed in each phase of the non measuring and the measuring processes. When we consider the dynamics of wave function collapse we must account that the observed observable becomes a number ,with proper unity of measurements ,during the measurement, thus the linear hermitean operator to which is connected before the measurement, disappears and in its place it appears a new operator that maintain the non commutativity with the other operators to which the old and disappeared operator was connected.
Category: Quantum Physics

[67] viXra:1907.0425 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-22 08:51:42

Nanoantennas Wireless Connections

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Researchers from the Nanophotonic Technology Centre (NTC) of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) have designed new silicon nanoantennas with direct applications in communication and data processing for the next generation of reconfigurable photonic chips. [32] Embeddable sensors record how and when neurons fire; electrodes spark heart cells to beat or brain cells to fire; neuron-like devices could even encourage faster regrowth after implantation in the brain. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids-a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation-capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[66] viXra:1907.0422 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-22 10:06:35

Imaging Molecules Atom by Atom

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

For physicist Percy Zahl, optimizing and preparing a noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM) to directly visualize the chemical structure of a single molecule is a bit like playing a virtual reality video game. [33] Almost all living organisms from bacteria to humans have gate-like protein complexes in their cell membranes that get rid of unwanted or life-threatening molecules. [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[65] viXra:1907.0421 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-22 13:10:10

Record-Setting Quantum Motion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

Showcasing precise control at the quantum level, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for making an ion (electrically charged atom) display exact quantities of quantum-level motion-any specific amount up to 100 packets of energy or "quanta," more than five times the previous record high of 17. [28] Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and NIST, have shown that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster and more accurately than with standard methods. [27] Over the last few decades, the exponential increase in computer power and accompanying increase in the quality of algorithms has enabled theoretical and particle physicists to perform more complex and precise simulations of fundamental particles and their interactions. [26] A collaboration of scientists from five of the world's most advanced x-ray sources in Europe, Japan and the US, has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[64] viXra:1907.0385 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-19 09:02:28

Dipolar Bose-Einstein Condensates

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 28 Pages.

A team of researchers at Aarhus University in Denmark has recently carried out a study exploring supersolidity in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC), states of matter in which separate atomscooled to near absolute zero unite into a single quantum mechanical entity. [16] An international team of researchers has successfully produced a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in space for the first time. [15] Researchers at UCM and CSS have encountered a partial violation of the second law of thermodynamics in a quantum system known as Hofstadter lattice. [13] Any understanding of the irreversibility of the arrow of time should account the quantum nature of the world that surrounds us. [12] Entropy, the measure of disorder in a physical system, is something that physicists understand well when systems are at equilibrium, meaning there's no external force throwing things out of kilter. But new research by Brown University physicists takes the idea of entropy out of its equilibrium comfort zone. [11] Could scientists use the Second Law of Thermodynamics on your chewing muscles to work out when you are going to die? According to research published in the International Journal of Exergy, the level of entropy, or thermodynamic disorder, in the chewing muscles in your jaw increases with each mouthful. This entropy begins to accumulate from the moment you're "on solids" until your last meal, but measuring it at any given point in your life could be used to estimate life expectancy. [10] There is also connection between statistical physics and evolutionary biology, since the arrow of time is working in the biological evolution also. From the standpoint of physics, there is one essential difference between living things and inanimate clumps of carbon atoms: The former tend to be much better at capturing energy from their environment and dissipating that energy as heat. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[63] viXra:1907.0374 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-20 01:13:50

X-ray Mapping of Magnesium

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

A world-first study led by Monash University has discovered a technique and phenomenon that can be used for creating stronger, lightweight magnesium alloys that could improve structural integrity in the automobile and aerospace industries. [36] In a new study published Aug. 17 in Nature Communications, Nemsak, Fadley, Schneider and colleagues demonstrate the use of new techniques in X-ray spectroscopy to illuminate the internal structure of manganese-doped gallium arsenide. [35] With the publication of the first experimental measurements performed at the facility, the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (EuXFEL) has passed another critical milestone since its launch in September 2017. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[62] viXra:1907.0369 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-20 04:05:58

Quantum Interference in Information Technology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and NIST, have shown that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster and more accurately than with standard methods. [27] Over the last few decades, the exponential increase in computer power and accompanying increase in the quality of algorithms has enabled theoretical and particle physicists to perform more complex and precise simulations of fundamental particles and their interactions. [26] A collaboration of scientists from five of the world's most advanced x-ray sources in Europe, Japan and the US, has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices-small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[61] viXra:1907.0367 [pdf] replaced on 2019-07-21 13:56:34

Smoking Gun Physics

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle
Comments: 8 Pages.

In this paper, we wonder whether the idea of virtual particles, gauge bosons and/or force-carrying particles in general, might be superfluous. It seems to resemble 19th century aether theory: perhaps we don’t need it. The implication is clear: if that’s the case, then we also don’t need gauge theory and/or quantum field theory.
Category: Quantum Physics

[60] viXra:1907.0364 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-18 08:45:00

Graphene Superconductor More Tune

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a graphene device that's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits. [29] Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. [28] US researchers studying high-temperature cuprate superconductors outside the superconducting regime have used cutting-edge X-ray scattering to detect long-predicted-but never previously observed-excitations called plasmons perpendicular to the material's atomic planes. [27] Using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) techniques, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered a new quantum criticality in a superconducting material, leading to a greater understanding of the link between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity. [26] Improving these devices could mean more powerful computers, better detectors of disease and technological advances scientists can't even predict yet. [25] Researchers at the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have demonstrated a new way to address a central problem in quantum physics: at the quantum scale, any measurement disturbs the measured object. [24] An answer to a quantum-physical question provided by the algorithm Melvin has uncovered a hidden link between quantum experiments and the mathematical field of Graph Theory. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[59] viXra:1907.0342 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-17 10:13:05

Rydberg Quantum Simulators

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

The three-year Rydberg Quantum Simulators (RYSQ) project was set up to capitalize on the versatility of Rydberg atoms in order to address a variety of quantum simulations. [38] Using lasers, U.S. and Austrian physicists have coaxed ultracold strontium atoms into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. [37] A team of researchers has now presented this state of matter in the journal Physical Review Letters. The theoretical work was done at TU Wien (Vienna) and Harvard University, the experiment was performed at Rice University in Houston (Texas). [36] The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do-but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information-known as qubits-that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[58] viXra:1907.0338 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-17 11:07:43

Serendipity Quantum Photonic

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

During her research on measuring light wavelengths using this photonic chip, Caterina Taballione of the University of Twente came across yet another application serendipitously-by sending single photons through the system instead of continuous light, the optical components can perform quantum operations, as well. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon-the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy-in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[57] viXra:1907.0333 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-18 01:02:45

Two-Qubit Gate

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 82 Pages.

A group of scientists led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons have achieved the first two-qubit gate between atom qubits in silicon-a major milestone on the team's quest to build an atom-scale quantum computer. [48] In a recent study, researchers at the University of Colorado have resolved phonon Fock states in the spectrum of a superconducting qubit coupled to a multimode acoustic cavity. [47] "Our bacterially produced graphene material will lead to far better suitability for product development," Meyer says. [46] Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38]
Category: Quantum Physics

[56] viXra:1907.0330 [pdf] replaced on 2019-07-19 05:53:42

Is the Weak Force a Force?

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle
Comments: 9 Pages.

In our previous paper, we explored the epistemological foundation of quantum chromodynamics: what concepts and models are we using, and what does Occam’s Razor Principle has to say about that? In this paper we do the same for the weak force. We think the force concept should not be applied to the analysis of decay or disintegration processes. The idea of W and/or Z bosons mediating the weak force makes even less sense. W/Z bosons should be thought of as debris: transient or resonant matter. We suggest the whole idea of bosons mediating forces resembles 19th century aether theory: we don’t need it. The implication is clear: if that’s the case, then we also don’t need gauge theory and/or quantum field theory.
Category: Quantum Physics

[55] viXra:1907.0327 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 08:34:28

Bohr's Complementarity and Afshar's Experiment: Non-Dualistic Study at the Single-Quantum Level

Authors: C Ravi Kumar, N Gurappa
Comments: 4 pages, 1 figure

Using a newly proposed `wave-particle non-dualistic interpretation' of the quantum formalism, Bohr's principle of complementarity is analyzed in the context of the single-slit diffraction and the Afshar's experiments - at the single-quantum level. The fundamental flaw in the Afshar's argument is explicitly pointed out.
Category: Quantum Physics

[54] viXra:1907.0325 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 10:40:26

Majorana Photons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Alfano and his research team are claiming another breakthrough with a new super-class of photons dubbed "Majorana photons." [34] As mysterious as the Italian scientist for which it is named, the Majorana particle is one of the most compelling quests in physics. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[53] viXra:1907.0322 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 12:39:27

Limitations in Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

A new study from the University of Utah found that in fact, when the insulating layers are as thin as 16 quintuple atomic layers across, the top and bottom metallic surfaces begin to influence each other and destroy their metallic properties. [35] Hailed as a pioneer by Photonics Media for his previous discoveries of supercontinuum and Cr tunable lasers, City College of New York Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering Robert R. Alfano and his research team are claiming another breakthrough with a new super-class of photons dubbed "Majorana photons." [34] As mysterious as the Italian scientist for which it is named, the Majorana particle is one of the most compelling quests in physics. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[52] viXra:1907.0311 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-17 00:42:37

Quantum Information Processing Qudits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Purdue University researchers are among the first to build a gate-what could be a quantum version of a transistor, used in today's computers for processing information-with qudits. [16] Quantum physics has led to new types of sensors, secure data transmission methods and researchers are working toward computers. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[51] viXra:1907.0277 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 13:45:40

Estudo Teórico Sobre as Propriedades Eletrônicas de Nanoestruturas de Carbono e H-BN

Authors: Guilherme Angelo Moreira Bernardo, Mirleide Dantas Lopes, Sérgio André Fontes Azevedo
Comments: 11 Pages.

The study of nanomaterials has consolidated as a new revolution in the scientific environment. Among the most investigated nanostructures currently are the derivatives of carbon and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Graphene for example it is a hexagonal two-dimensional lattice formed only by carbon atoms. In this sense, we investigated the formation energy and the electronic structure of a graphene plane, a h-BN plane, as well as, four nanocones, with disclination of 60° each, two of them derived from graphene and two derived from h-BN. These investigations were made through the SIESTA Code, a free software that uses first-principles methods, based on Density Functional Theory (DFT), as a parameter for its execution. From observations it was possible to identify which nanostructures showed greater stability, depending on the atomic organization of their respective crystal lattices. In the investigated nanomaterials we realized that both the formation energy per atom and the electron density varied noticeably in function of the different atomic arrangements. Regarding the electrical conductivity, the structures researched presented good agreement with the literature, thus reaffirming the applicability of these nanomaterials in electronic devices.
Category: Quantum Physics

[50] viXra:1907.0260 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 00:44:30

Proof that the De Broglie Wavelength of a Moving Electron is Equivalent to the Beat Frequency Wavelength of the Electron Standing Wave’s in and Out Spherical Wave Components.

Authors: Declan Traill
Comments: 3 Pages.

The De Broglie wave that accompanies a moving particle is evidence of the wave nature of matter and is supporting evidence for Quantum Mechanics, yet this phenomenon can also be explained using only Classical Physics and the knowledge that an electron is a spherical standing wave.
Category: Quantum Physics

[49] viXra:1907.0259 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 01:37:04

Exploration Coupled Light and Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

The group of Prof. Ataç İmamoğlu has now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. [41] The researchers harnessed the power of polaritons, particles that blur the distinction between light and matter. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39]
Category: Quantum Physics

[48] viXra:1907.0256 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 02:36:54

Quantum Logic Clock

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

The quantum logic clock—perhaps best known for showing you age faster if you stand on a stool—has climbed back to the leading performance echelons of the world's experimental atomic clocks. [42] The group of Prof. Ataç İmamoğlu has now developed a new approach to study nonlinear optical properties of polaritons in strongly correlated electronic states. [41] The researchers harnessed the power of polaritons, particles that blur the distinction between light and matter. [40]
Category: Quantum Physics

[47] viXra:1907.0255 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 03:01:10

Quantum Computer Fight Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Case Western Reserve University researchers are working to change that. They have pioneered a new approach called Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting, which uses more sensitive scanning techniques that they expect could detect whether treatments are working after just one dose of chemo. [36] The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing-quantum chemistry-would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures-coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule-occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[46] viXra:1907.0254 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 03:16:01

Quantum Model of Ferrofluid Motion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Ferrofluids, with their mesmeric display of shape-shifting spikes, are a favorite exhibit in science shows. These eye-catching examples of magnetic fields in action could become even more dramatic through computational work that captures their motion. [37] Case Western Reserve University researchers are working to change that. They have pioneered a new approach called Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting, which uses more sensitive scanning techniques that they expect could detect whether treatments are working after just one dose of chemo. [36] The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing-quantum chemistry-would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[45] viXra:1907.0253 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-16 03:31:05

3-D Quantum Spin Liquid

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

There's no known way to prove a three-dimensional "quantum spin liquid" exists, so Rice University physicists and their collaborators did the next best thing: They showed their single crystals of cerium zirconium pyrochlore had the right stuff to qualify as the first possible 3-D version of the long-sought state of matter. [32] With potential roles in quantum computation, high-temperature superconductivity and a range of exotic anyonic states, why quantum spin liquids (QSLs) attract interest is no great mystery. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene-an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike-move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[44] viXra:1907.0246 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-14 09:14:45

Molecular Motions in Real Time

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Researchers have used ultra-high-speed X-ray pulses to make a high-resolution "movie" of a molecule undergoing structural motions. [31] "In biology, it turns out that evolution has selected things that are extremely effective at absorbing the energy and not breaking a bond," Leone said. "When something goes wrong in your chemistry is when you see diseases cropping up." [30] A team of researchers from IBM Research-Zurich, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company and Universidade de Santiago de Compostela has, for the first time, imaged molecules as they change charge states. [29] A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality-a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties. [28] UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. [27] A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21]
Category: Quantum Physics

[43] viXra:1907.0227 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-13 07:42:43

Image of Quantum Entanglement

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement—capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41]
Category: Quantum Physics

[42] viXra:1907.0213 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-12 10:29:11

Perfect Quantum Theory

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems. [15] New quantum theory research, led by academics at the University of St Andrews' School of Physics, could transform the way scientists predict how quantum particles behave. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. [13] To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[41] viXra:1907.0197 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 13:59:46

Quantum Correlation and Spacetime

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

These insights may prove useful for the development of future theories unifying quantum mechanics and gravity." [46] Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[40] viXra:1907.0194 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-12 01:19:34

Qubits in Multimode Cavity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Colorado have resolved phonon Fock states in the spectrum of a superconducting qubit coupled to a multimode acoustic cavity. [47] "Our bacterially produced graphene material will lead to far better suitability for product development," Meyer says. [46] Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37]
Category: Quantum Physics

[39] viXra:1907.0189 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-12 04:28:45

Strange Warping Quantum Geometry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Solving the problems mathematically is beyond the capabilities of modern computers, so scientists at Princeton University have turned to an unusual branch of geometry instead. [30] A team of researchers at Technische Universität Darmstadt has broken the record for the number of atoms positioned individually in a trap to create a defect-free array. [29] University of Toronto Engineering researchers have combined two emerging technologies for next-generation solar power-and discovered that each one helps stabilize the other. [28] Photoresponsive flash memories made from organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) that can be quickly erased using just light might find use in a host of applications, including flexible imaging circuits, infra-red sensing memories and multibit-storage memory cells. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[38] viXra:1907.0186 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-12 06:59:21

Electron Camera Ultrafast

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

The tool is an instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction (MeV-UED). It uses a beam of highly energetic electrons to probe matter and is especially useful for understanding atomic processes occurring on timescales as short as about 100 femtoseconds, millionths of a billionth of a second. [39] Princeton researchers have demonstrated a new way of making controllable "quantum wires" in the presence of a magnetic field, according to a new study published in Nature. [38] Physicists at the Kastler Brossel Laboratory in Paris have reached a milestone in the combination of cold atoms and nanophotonics. [37]
Category: Quantum Physics

[37] viXra:1907.0178 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-10 06:44:16

Laser Scanning Microscopy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

Laser-scanning microscopes can be miniaturized to image microenvironments in vivo via inclusion inside optical micromechanical system (MEMS) devices to replace the existing larger components. [42] A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. [41] A team of researchers from the University of Central Florida and Michigan Technological University has developed a laser system concept built on the principles of supersymmetry. [40]
Category: Quantum Physics

[36] viXra:1907.0177 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-10 07:00:21

Nanoscale Sound in Microresonator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

When traversing a solid material such as glass, a light wave can deposit part of its energy in a mechanical wave, leading to a color change of the light. [43] Laser-scanning microscopes can be miniaturized to image microenvironments in vivo via inclusion inside optical micromechanical system (MEMS) devices to replace the existing larger components. [42] A team led by University of Utah physicists has discovered how to fix a major problem that occurs in lasers made from a new type of material called quantum dots. [41]
Category: Quantum Physics

[35] viXra:1907.0174 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-10 13:13:50

Quantum Chessboard Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[34] viXra:1907.0170 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 02:02:31

Vacuum Fluctuation Time Flow

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Konstanz have recently carried out a study exploring the quantum states of light and vacuum fluctuations, as well as their interplay with time. [46] Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[33] viXra:1907.0168 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 02:21:52

Quantum Mechanics Lock Heat

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 79 Pages.

A groundbreaking study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has revealed a method of using quantum mechanical wave theories to "lock" heat into a fixed position. [47] Researchers at the University of Konstanz have recently carried out a study exploring the quantum states of light and vacuum fluctuations, as well as their interplay with time. [46] Physicists at the University of Innsbruck are proposing a new model that could demonstrate the supremacy of quantum computers over classical supercomputers in solving optimization problems. [45] Using data from the CMS experiment there, the researchers studied the entropy resulting from entanglement within the proton. [44] A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37]
Category: Quantum Physics

[32] viXra:1907.0166 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 03:09:54

Ferromagnetic Superconductor Behavior

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

Researchers from France and Russia have offered a theoretical explanation for the behavior of a recently discovered material combining superconducting and ferromagnetic properties. [28] Newly published research from a team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory sheds more light on the nature of high-temperature iron-based superconductivity. [27] Scientists at Harvard have developed a bismuth-based, two-dimensional superconductor that is only one nanometer thick. [26] Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science. [25] Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconductors in which they change from superconductor to special metal and then to insulator. [24] Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. [23] Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in "stripe-ordered" cuprates-copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism-discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. [22] This discovery makes it clear that in order to understand the mechanism behind the enigmatic high temperature superconductivity of the cuprates, this exotic PDW state needs to be taken into account, and therefore opens a new frontier in cuprate research. [21] High-temperature (Tc) superconductivity typically develops from antiferromagnetic insulators, and superconductivity and ferromagnetism are always mutually exclusive. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[31] viXra:1907.0165 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 03:42:55

Organic Light Emitting Diodes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Organic light-emitting diodes are components that no longer consist of compounds containing the semiconducting material gallium, but of so-called organic compounds in which carbon is a main component. [43] Laser-scanning microscopes can be miniaturized to image microenvironments in vivo via inclusion inside optical micromechanical system (MEMS) devices to replace the existing larger components. [42]
Category: Quantum Physics

[30] viXra:1907.0163 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-09 08:39:22

Micro Ring Resonator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Micro Ring Resonator Researchers at MIT and Singapore University of Technology (SUTD) have demonstrated a micro ring resonator made of amorphous silicon carbide with the highest quality factor to date. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30] KU Leuven researchers from the Roeffaers Lab and the Hofkens Group have now put forward a very promising direct X-ray detector design, based on a rapidly emerging halide perovskite semiconductor, with chemical formula Cs2AgBiBr6. [29] Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate, thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27]
Category: Quantum Physics

[29] viXra:1907.0157 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-09 13:07:34

Connecting Quantum Dots

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) developed a new technique that could enable future advancements in quantum technology. [29] University of Toronto Engineering researchers have combined two emerging technologies for next-generation solar power-and discovered that each one helps stabilize the other. [28] Photoresponsive flash memories made from organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) that can be quickly erased using just light might find use in a host of applications, including flexible imaging circuits, infra-red sensing memories and multibit-storage memory cells. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins-just a hair above absolute zero-and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19]
Category: Quantum Physics

[28] viXra:1907.0151 [pdf] replaced on 2019-07-14 22:28:35

Derivation of the Fine Structure Constant from the Electron Wave Function

Authors: Declan Traill
Comments: 7 Pages.

The fine structure constant α characterizes the strength of the electromagnetic interaction between elementary charged particles. Its value can be derived from the wave function for the electron. The electron wave function describes a field of Harmonic Oscillators which have the energy of the rest-mass of an electron. However, it takes time for such an Oscillator to complete a cycle of oscillation, so during this time the electromagnetic field that propagates into space from the Oscillator has expanded away from its source to cover the surface area of a three-dimensional shape. Therefore, the amplitude of the oscillations has been reduced before it can interact with its surrounding environment. The amount of this diminution is what the fine structure constant α represents. The actual value of α also depends on the fact that the source of the spreading energy is rotating Harmonic Oscillators. Classically, a point source will spread evenly in all directions and the intensity will diminish with Inverse-Square Law. But in the actual electron wave-function, the Harmonic Oscillators are rotating whilst expanding, causing the area that the energy spreads out over to be that of an expanding cone as well as that of a sphere. The area of this shape is greater than that of a simple sphere; this is what causes the fine structure constant α to have the value that it does.
Category: Quantum Physics

[27] viXra:1907.0150 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-10 01:15:46

Arrow of Time in Quantum Systems

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 32 Pages.

New experiments conducted at Washington University in St. Louis compare the forward and reverse trajectories of superconducting circuits called qubits, and find that they follow the second law of thermodynamics. [23] Leaders in the field of ultracold molecule research from Columbia and Harvard universities are teaming up to propel understanding of the quantum mechanics of chemical reactions. [22] Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20] Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. [19] A team of researchers with members from IBM Research-Zurich and RWTH Aachen University has announced the development of a new PCM (phase change memory) design that offers miniaturized memory cell volume down to three nanometers. [18] Monatomic glassy antimony might be used as a new type of single-element phase change memory. [17] Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[26] viXra:1907.0146 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-10 04:35:27

Artificial Atoms Quantum Sensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[25] viXra:1907.0140 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-08 07:56:44

Future Spintronics Applications

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

A theoretical-experimental collaboration across two FLEET nodes has discovered new magnetic properties within 2-D structures, with exciting potential for researchers in the emerging field of spintronics. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[24] viXra:1907.0138 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-08 09:57:28

Smart Glass of Artificial Vision

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have devised a method to create pieces of "smart" glass that can recognize images without requiring any sensors or circuits or power sources. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38]
Category: Quantum Physics

[23] viXra:1907.0136 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-08 12:35:27

Quantum Research in Ultracold Molecules

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Leaders in the field of ultracold molecule research from Columbia and Harvard universities are teaming up to propel understanding of the quantum mechanics of chemical reactions. [22] Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20] Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. [19] A team of researchers with members from IBM Research-Zurich and RWTH Aachen University has announced the development of a new PCM (phase change memory) design that offers miniaturized memory cell volume down to three nanometers. [18] Monatomic glassy antimony might be used as a new type of single-element phase change memory. [17] Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
Category: Quantum Physics

[22] viXra:1907.0128 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-09 00:02:04

Pairing Glue in Superconductors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Newly published research from a team of scientists led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory sheds more light on the nature of high-temperature iron-based superconductivity. [27] Scientists at Harvard have developed a bismuth-based, two-dimensional superconductor that is only one nanometer thick. [26] Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science. [25] Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconductors in which they change from superconductor to special metal and then to insulator. [24] Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. [23] Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in "stripe-ordered" cuprates-copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism-discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. [22] This discovery makes it clear that in order to understand the mechanism behind the enigmatic high temperature superconductivity of the cuprates, this exotic PDW state needs to be taken into account, and therefore opens a new frontier in cuprate research. [21] High-temperature (Tc) superconductivity typically develops from antiferromagnetic insulators, and superconductivity and ferromagnetism are always mutually exclusive.
Category: Quantum Physics

[21] viXra:1907.0124 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-09 06:16:16

In the Field of Physics We Fairly Well Know What Fundamental Interactions (Forces) do But We Cannot Know What They Are or Where They Come From: Caught Between Philosophy and Theory

Authors: Bruce A. Lutgen
Comments: 2 Pages.

Mathematics is a precise effective method of communication that is used in science as well as everyday life. Beside mathematics being a means of communication, words are also an exacting means of communication. These conventions have been developed over the millennia and are so well accepted that they in a way tie our hands. With that, there is the unresolved difficulty in defining fundamental interactions by what they are while using the only two tools at our disposal.
Category: Quantum Physics

[20] viXra:1907.0113 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-08 03:58:23

The Spin of the Electron is the Orbital Angular Momentum of the Photon Within the Electron

Authors: Adrian Ferent
Comments: 380 Pages. © 2014 Adrian Ferent

“The Spin of the electron is the Orbital angular momentum of the photon within the electron” Adrian Ferent “The circumference of the electron is λ / 2, half of photon wavelength” Adrian Ferent “The angular momentum of Dark Matter inside the electron is very small, because the volume of the Dark Matter is very small and the mass of the Dark Matter is very small” Adrian Ferent “The electron is a photon around Dark Matter” Adrian Ferent What is Spin? Spin in quantum mechanics is an intrinsic form of angular momentum carried by elementary particles. Spin is an intrinsic property of a particle because nobody was able to explain it. Electrons always have "spin 1/2", this actually means "spin ħ/2". ħ = h/(2π) Spin is an intrinsic property, because all Nobel Laureates, the greatest scientists, your professors…were not able to explain the "spin ħ/2" of the electron. Orbital angular momentum: L = r × p An electric field surrounds an electric charge; the same thing inside the electron, the electric field of the photon surrounds the center of the electron. The radius of the electron is a challenging problem of the modern theoretical physics because a finite radius of the electron is incompatible to the premises of the theory of relativity and a point-like electron generates serious mathematical difficulties due to the self-energy of the electron tending to infinity. The radius of the electron is a challenging problem of the modern theoretical physics because nobody was capable to explain what is the electron, what is the electric charge, what is the “spin ħ/2" of the electron. “The photon inside the electron, inside the volume, gives the electric charge” Adrian Ferent “The electron has an electric field due to the photon inside the electron” Adrian Ferent Half wavelength, λ / 2, of the photon the electric field, E, is positive. Have the same sign. This means: “The circumference of the electron is λ / 2, half of photon wavelength” Adrian Ferent “The angular momentum of Dark Matter inside the electron is very small, because the volume of the Dark Matter is very small and the mass of the Dark Matter is very small” Adrian Ferent How to calculate the Spin of the electron? The Orbital angular momentum of the photon in an electron: L = r × p Where: r = (λ / 2) / 2π p = h / λ This means: L = (λ / 4π) × (h / λ) L = ħ / 2 This means: “The Spin of the electron is the Orbital angular momentum of the photon within the electron” Adrian Ferent 230. I am the first who discovered that the Spin of the electron is the Orbital angular momentum of the photon within the electron 231. I am the first who discovered that the circumference of the electron is λ / 2, half of photon wavelength 232. I am the first who discovered that the angular momentum of Dark Matter inside the electron is very small, because the volume of the Dark Matter is very small and the mass of the Dark Matter is very small
Category: Quantum Physics

[19] viXra:1907.0105 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-06 14:34:50

Experiments of Interference with Coincident or Shifted in Time Laser Pulses

Authors: Lozko Georgiev, Daniel Georgiev
Comments: 21 Pages. in Bulgarian

This article explores experiments on interference with electromagnetic waves. Some of the problems of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics are discussed. The laws of interference with symmetric and asymmetric interferometers are discussed. With a permanently emitting laser source and artificially obtained (cloned) laser pulses. Coincident or shifted in the time when they reach the viewing screen. Two possible models of interference and experimental demonstration of the working model are examined
Category: Quantum Physics

[18] viXra:1907.0102 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-06 23:41:20

Precision of Indeterminacy Principle

Authors: Deep Jyoti Dutta
Comments: 2 Pages.

This paper seeks to propose certain experiments which can be performed to find the reality of indeterminacy principle (IP) or commonly known as uncertainty principle. We argue that the IP is a very fragile limitation of what one can measure which can be violated with highly precise techniques and modern ideas.
Category: Quantum Physics

[17] viXra:1907.0099 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-05 07:22:21

Light Polarization in Full

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 28 Pages.

A compact and simple camera that can determine the full polarization of light has been developed by researchers in the US. [19] In their experiments, the researchers first transformed an ordinary laser beam into an accelerating one by reflecting the laser beam off of a spatial light modulator. [18] Researchers from Umeå University and Linköping University in Sweden have developed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) that emit strong light at high efficiency. As such, the thin, flexible and lightweight LEC promises future and improved applications within home diagnostics, signage, illumination and healthcare. [17] Physicists from the ATLAS experiment at CERN have found the first direct evidence of high energy light-by-light scattering, a very rare process in which two photons-particles of light-interact and change direction. [16] In materials research, chemistry, biology, and medicine, chemical bonds, and especially their dynamic behavior, determine the properties of a system. These can be examined very closely using terahertz radiation and short pulses. [15] An international collaborative of scientists has devised a method to control the number of optical solitons in microresonators, which underlie modern photonics. [14] Solitary waves called solitons are one of nature's great curiosities: Unlike other waves, these lone wolf waves keep their energy and shape as they travel, instead of dissipating or dispersing as most other waves do. In a new paper in Physical Review Letters (PRL), a team of mathematicians, physicists and engineers tackles a famous, 50-year-old problem tied to these enigmatic entities. [13] Theoretical physicists studying the behavior of ultra-cold atoms have discovered a new source of friction, dispensing with a century-old paradox in the process. Their prediction, which experimenters may soon try to verify, was reported recently in Physical Review Letters. [12] Solitons are localized wave disturbances that propagate without changing shape, a result of a nonlinear interaction that compensates for wave packet dispersion. Individual solitons may collide, but a defining feature is that they pass through one another and emerge from the collision unaltered in shape, amplitude, or velocity, but with a new trajectory reflecting a discontinuous jump.
Category: Quantum Physics

[16] viXra:1907.0097 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-05 09:01:19

Polarization-Sensitive Camera

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

"This research opens an exciting new direction for camera technology with unprecedented compactness, allowing us to envision applications in atmospheric science, remote sensing, facial recognition, machine vision and more," said Capasso. [20] A compact and simple camera that can determine the full polarization of light has been developed by researchers in the US. [19] In their experiments, the researchers first transformed an ordinary laser beam into an accelerating one by reflecting the laser beam off of a spatial light modulator. [18] Researchers from Umeå University and Linköping University in Sweden have developed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) that emit strong light at high efficiency. As such, the thin, flexible and lightweight LEC promises future and improved applications within home diagnostics, signage, illumination and healthcare. [17] Physicists from the ATLAS experiment at CERN have found the first direct evidence of high energy light-by-light scattering, a very rare process in which two photons-particles of light-interact and change direction. [16] In materials research, chemistry, biology, and medicine, chemical bonds, and especially their dynamic behavior, determine the properties of a system. These can be examined very closely using terahertz radiation and short pulses. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[15] viXra:1907.0086 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-05 23:08:06

Young's Double-Slit and Wheeler's Delayed-Choice Experiments: What's Really Happening at the Single-Quantum Level?

Authors: N Gurappa
Comments: 13 pages, 1 figure

A new `wave-particle non-dualistic interpretation' at the single-quantum level, existing within the quantum formalism, is presented by showing the Schr\"odinger wave function as an `{\it instantaneous resonant spatial mode}' where a particle moves. For the first time, the position eigenstate of a particle is identified to be related to the absolute phase of the wave function in such a way that its position eigen values always lie on a classical trajectory, proving that the `time parameter' is common to both classical and quantum mechanics. It's brought into light that the quantum formalism demands a different kind of boundary conditions to be imposed to the wave function unlike classical formalism and hence naturally yields the Born rule as a limiting case of the relative frequency of detection. This derivation of the Born rule automatically resolves the measurement problem. Also, these boundary conditions immediately expound Bohr's principle of complementarity at a single quantum level. Further, the non-duality naturally contains the required physical mechanism to elucidate why the Copenhagen interpretation is experimentally so successful. The single-quantum phenomenon is then used to unambiguously explain what's really going on in the Young double-slit experiment as anticipated by Feynmann and the same is again used to provide a causal explanation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment.
Category: Quantum Physics

[14] viXra:1907.0085 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-05 23:13:20

Physical Mechanism Underlying ``einstein's Spooky-Action-at-a-Distance" and the Nature of Quantum Entanglement

Authors: N Gurappa
Comments: 15 pages, 4 figures

The delayed-choice entanglement swapping experiments, both in space and time, are casually explained at a single quantum level by using the `wave-particle non-dualistic interpretation of quantum mechanics'. In order to achieve this, the actual mechanisms involved in the Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment and Einstein's spooky-action-at-a-distance are uncovered from the quantum formalism. The continuity in the motion of any individual quantum particle, due to the constants of motion, is responsible for the outcomes of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment. The purpose for the existence of spooky action in Nature is to strictly maintain the conservation laws in absence of exchange-interactions. The presence of a casual structure in the entanglement swapping is shown by detailed analysis of the experimental results presented in the papers, ``X-S. Ma et al., Nature. Phys. 8, 480, (2012)'' and ``E. Megidish et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 210403 (2013)'', at the level of individual quantum events. These experiments are directly confirming the wave-particle non-duality.
Category: Quantum Physics

[13] viXra:1907.0075 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-04 07:15:41

Combine Light and Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

The research is part of a greater effort in Assoc. Prof. Jonathan Simon's lab to break down the walls between matter and light, in order to investigate their fundamental properties. [22] Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[12] viXra:1907.0074 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-04 07:49:59

An Alternative Depiction of the Sub-Atomic Model

Authors: Murray Edward McGill
Comments: 23 Pages.

This thesis is an alternative model of the sub atomic structure based on three premises: 1. The fundamental make-up of matter 2. The rotational rate of matter 3. The non-planar rotation of matter From these three assumptions I will unify the four fundamental forces and redefine the base understanding of magnetism. Further this will rewrite our quantum model and Einstein’s relativity, as it relates to quantum. This is a tall order and if I was afraid of appearing a fool, I wouldn’t have submitted it. But, the quest for understanding requires us to sometimes stand alone and look the fool. “Our knowledge can only be finite, while our ignorance must necessarily be infinite” (Karl Popper) This paper is written in a Copernican style, but with enough substance to convey understanding of this alternative model. This understanding leads to the demand for further inquiry.
Category: Quantum Physics

[11] viXra:1907.0049 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-03 12:20:57

Nonlocal Quantum Transfer of Classical Information
Нелокальная квантовая передача классической информации

Authors: Putenikhin P.V.
Comments: 31 Pages. rus

A modification of the traditional setup for teleporting the quantum state of a qubit is considered. On the transmitting side, it is changed to the opposite sequence of the CNOT gates and the Hadamard gates. The modified installation allows you to teleport now no longer just an unknown state of the qubit, but a state of entanglement of qubits. On the transmitter side, the installation translates two qubits into a state of entanglement, with the result that, at the receiver side, two qubits also end up in a state of entanglement. It is shown also the possibility of direct transmission of classical information using the gate CNOT
Рассмотрена модификация традиционной установки для телепортации квантового состояния кубита. На передающей стороне изменена на противоположную последовательность гейтов CNOT и гейта Адамара. Модифицированная установка позволяет телепортировать теперь уже не просто неизвестное состояние кубита, а состояние запутанности кубитов. На стороне передатчика установка переводит два кубита в состояние запутанности, в результате чего и на стороне приемника два кубита также оказываются в состоянии запу-танности. Показана также возможность непосредственной передачи классической информации с помощью гейта CNOT.
Category: Quantum Physics

[10] viXra:1907.0043 [pdf] replaced on 2019-07-16 01:58:00

A Realist Interpretation of QCD

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle
Comments: 12 Pages.

This paper explores the epistemological foundation of quantum chromodynamics. We do so by re-examining the concept of partons, which was introduced by Richard Feynman as a generic term for pointlike constituents of matter. We examine whether or not the concept of a colorless, flavorless and zero-charge parton – onto which we can then load the various properties that are necessary to explain reality – might work. The conclusion is that the parton model may offer sufficient degrees of freedom to model what the quark-gluon model is modelling. In fact, we suggest the idea of quarks and gluons might be a bit like the 19th century aether theory: we don’t need it. The underlying question is, of course, much more fundamental: do we need quantum field theory?
Category: Quantum Physics

[9] viXra:1907.0042 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-02 09:25:26

Loose Thread of String Theory Puzzle

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 101 Pages.

A University of Colorado Boulder physicist is one step closer to solving a string theory puzzle 20 years in the making. [58] Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. [57] Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail. [56] A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. [55] Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle-the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. [54] Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. [53] Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy-a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. [52] Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits-utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits-adding a new suite of tools to the armory. [51]
Category: Quantum Physics

[8] viXra:1907.0041 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-02 10:11:14

Quantum States of Light in Silicon Chip

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 102 Pages.

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. [58] Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. [57] Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail. [56] A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. [55] Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle-the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. [54] Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. [53] Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy-a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. [52] Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits-utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits-adding a new suite of tools to the armory. [51]
Category: Quantum Physics

[7] viXra:1907.0033 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-03 02:30:04

Limits of Measurement Accuracy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[6] viXra:1907.0032 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-03 02:47:50

Sound in Bose-Einstein Condensates

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

There are two sound velocities in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In addition to the normal sound propagation there is second sound, which is a quantum phenomenon. [22] Quantum sensors can reach sensitivities that are impossible according to the laws of conventional physics that govern everyday life. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20] Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now discovered another class of particle-like magnetic object that could take the development of data storage devices a significant step forward. [19] A team of researchers with members from IBM Research-Zurich and RWTH Aachen University has announced the development of a new PCM (phase change memory) design that offers miniaturized memory cell volume down to three nanometers. [18] Monatomic glassy antimony might be used as a new type of single-element phase change memory. [17] Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
Category: Quantum Physics

[5] viXra:1907.0028 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 07:40:32

Delphi 2

Authors: M. W. Roberts
Comments: 16 Pages.

An optical communication system is described. The system provides a unique operational capability that allows rapid communications over long, even astronomical distances.
Category: Quantum Physics

[4] viXra:1907.0023 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 10:53:52

Electron-Phonon Interactions at BESSY

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

An HZB team at BESSY II has, for the first time, experimentally assessed the principal microscopic process of ultra-fast magnetism. [27] Scientists at Harvard have developed a bismuth-based, two-dimensional superconductor that is only one nanometer thick. [26] Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[3] viXra:1907.0022 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 11:20:21

Anomalies in Quantum Field Theories

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 100 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. [57] Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail. [56] A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. [55] Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle-the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. [54] Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. [53] Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy-a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. [52] Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits-utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits-adding a new suite of tools to the armory. [51] A team of international researchers led by engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have invented a new magnetic device to manipulate digital information 20 times more efficiently and with 10 times more stability than commercial spintronic digital memories. [50] Working in the lab of Mikhail Lukin, the George Vasmer Leverett Professor of Physics and co-director of the Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative, Evans is lead author of a study, described in the journal Science, that demonstrates a method for engineering an interaction between two qubits using photons. [49] Researchers with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a new level of control over photons encoded with quantum information. [48]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2] viXra:1907.0021 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 11:37:54

MRI on Single Atoms

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 101 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. [57] Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail. [56] A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. [55] Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle-the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. [54] Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. [53] Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy-a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. [52] Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits-utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits-adding a new suite of tools to the armory. [51]
Category: Quantum Physics

[1] viXra:1907.0016 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-02 02:07:54

Light Waves Accelerate Supercurrents

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 101 Pages.

Jigang Wang patiently explained his latest discovery in quantum control that could lead to superfast computing based on quantum mechanics. [58] Researchers at the University of Southampton and the Korea Institute for Advanced Study have recently showed that supersymmetry is anomalous in N=1 superconformal quantum field theories (SCFTs) with an anomalous R symmetry. [57] Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail. [56] A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. [55] Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle-the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. [54] Researchers have developed a new device that can measure and control a nanoparticle trapped in a laser beam with unprecedented sensitivity. [53] Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy-a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. [52] Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits-utilising the spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits-adding a new suite of tools to the armory. [51]
Category: Quantum Physics