Quantum Physics

1905 Submissions

[50] viXra:1905.0400 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 10:33:29

Quantum Cloud Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Quantum Cloud Computing With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. [27] Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology teamed up with colleagues from the U.S. and Switzerland and returned the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past. [26] Researchers at the University of Florence and Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, in Italy, have recently proved that the invasiveness of quantum measurements might not always be detrimental. [25] Now, researchers in the UK and Israel have created miniscule engines within a block of synthetic diamond, and have shown that electronic superposition can boost their power beyond that of classical devices. [24] In the latest wrinkle to be discovered in cubic boron arsenide, the unusual material contradicts the traditional rules that govern heat conduction, according to a new report by Boston College researchers in today's edition of the journal Nature Communications. [23] Beyond the beauty of this phenomenon, which connects heating processes to topology through an elegant quantization law, the results reported in this work designate heating measurements as a powerful and universal probe for exotic states of matter. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[49] viXra:1905.0399 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 10:57:38

Polariton Nano-Laser Operating

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

A room temperature polariton nano-laser has been demonstrated, along with several related research findings, regarding topics such as polariton physics at the nanoscale and also applications in quantum information systems. [41] The researchers harnessed the power of polaritons, particles that blur the distinction between light and matter. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[48] viXra:1905.0396 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 18:52:44

The Relationship of the Fine Structure Constant and Pi

Authors: Jeff Yee
Comments: 5 pages

In this paper, the fine structure constant is derived from a geometric ratio of surface areas, as a result of vibrations in a lattice with a body-centered cubic arrangement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[47] viXra:1905.0391 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-21 04:09:42

The New Periodic Table of Chemical Elements According to the Deterministic Quantum Model

Authors: Daniele Sasso
Comments: 9 Pages.

The current periodic table of chemical elements presents numerous problems because of the presence of many elements that are in actuality out of the periodic classification of groups, like transition elements that are about the half of chemical elements. Here we propose a new table that searches for solving many problems, even if not all. It is supposable hence that in future also this table can undergo changes and improvements because of a greater theoretical understanding and of a further experimental examination of chemical elements. The most important aspects of the new table consist in the 10+1 new groups in place of the present 7+1 and in the 15 periods in place of the present 7 periods. It allows to include inside the new table the numerous elements of transition that at present are out of a coherent classification.
Category: Quantum Physics

[46] viXra:1905.0356 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 01:49:55

The Henstock-Kurzweil-Feynman-Pardy Integral in Quantum Physics

Authors: Miroslav Pardy
Comments: 10 Pages. The original ideas published in reputable journals

The Feynman integral is generalised so as to involve the random fluctuations of vacuum, from this integral the generalized Schroedinger equation is derived and the energy spectrum for the Coulomb potential determined.
Category: Quantum Physics

[45] viXra:1905.0350 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-18 08:13:18

Laser of Sound Promises

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Most people are familiar with optical lasers through their experience with laser pointers. But what about a laser made from sound waves? [40] A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg/Germany presents evidence of the amplification of optical phonons in a solid by intense terahertz laser pulses. [39]
Category: Quantum Physics

[44] viXra:1905.0279 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 07:31:10

Macroscopic Electron Quantum Coherence

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 32 Pages.

A team of researchers at the Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies (C2N, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Saclay) has experimentally achieved the coherent propagation of electrons in circuits over macroscopic distances through a novel nano-engineering strategy. [20] Researchers in Madrid, Spain, have now observed the quantization of electron energy levels in copper similar to the effects of confinement within a nanostructure, but in a copper sample with no nanoscale dimensions in the plane of the observed effects. [19] This method, called atomic spin squeezing, works by redistributing the uncertainty unevenly between two components of spin in these measurements systems, which operate at the quantum scale. [18] Researchers from the University of Cambridge have taken a peek into the secretive domain of quantum mechanics. [17] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity-spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[43] viXra:1905.0278 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 08:01:37

Single Molecule Magnetometer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

A team of researchers from the University of California and Fudan University has developed a way to use a single molecule magnet as a scanning magnetometer. [40] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology designed a new type of molecular wire doped with organometallic ruthenium to achieve unprecedentedly higher conductance than earlier molecular wires. [39] Quantum wells of the highest quality are typically fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (sequential growth of crystalline layers), which is a well-established technique. [38] Scientists found that relatively slow electrons are produced when intense lasers interact with small clusters of atoms, upturning current theories. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[42] viXra:1905.0267 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 18:35:35

Cross-Double-Slit Apparatus

Authors: HuiPeng
Comments: 3 Pages.

We propose the Cross-Double-Slit apparatus for studying wave-particle duality and postulate that the particle nature of photons is intrinsic, while wave-like is an appearing behavior due to observation apparatus.
Category: Quantum Physics

[41] viXra:1905.0265 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-18 02:34:33

Manipulating Atoms One at a Time

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

The ultimate degree of control for engineering would be the ability to create and manipulate materials at the most basic level, fabricating devices atom by atom with precise control. [41] A team of researchers from the University of California and Fudan University has developed a way to use a single molecule magnet as a scanning magnetometer. [40] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology designed a new type of molecular wire doped with organometallic ruthenium to achieve unprecedentedly higher conductance than earlier molecular wires. [39] Quantum wells of the highest quality are typically fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (sequential growth of crystalline layers), which is a well-established technique. [38] Scientists found that relatively slow electrons are produced when intense lasers interact with small clusters of atoms, upturning current theories. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[40] viXra:1905.0263 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-18 05:05:17

Chip-Scale Atomic Clock

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and partners have demonstrated an experimental, next-generation atomic clock-ticking at high "optical" frequencies-that is much smaller than usual, made of just three small chips plus supporting electronics and optics. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology-a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today-a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[39] viXra:1905.0262 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-16 05:45:37

A Theory with Consolidation: Linking Everything to Explain Everything

Authors: Gaurav Biraris
Comments: 64 Pages.

The paper reports a theory which gives explicit (ontic) understanding of the abstract (epistemic) mechanisms spanning many branches of physics. It results to most modern physics starting from Newtonian physics by abandoning progress in twentieth century. The theory assumes consolidation of points in 4-balls of specific radius in the universe. Thus the 4-balls are fundamental elements of the universe. Analogue of momentum defined as soul vector is assumed to be induced on the 4-balls at the beginning of the universe. Then with progression of local time, collisions happen leading to different rotations of CNs. For such rotations, the consolidation provides centripetal binding. By using general terminologies of force and work, the mass energy mechanism gets revealed. The theory provides explicit interpretation of intrinsic properties of mass, electric charge, color charge, weak charge, spin etc. It also provides explicit understanding of the wave-particle duality & quantum mechanics. Epistemic study of the universe with the consolidation results to conventional quantum theories. Elementary mechanism of the field interactions is evident due to conservation of the soul vectors, and its epistemic expectation results to the gauge theories. The theory predicts that four types of interaction would exist in the universe along with the acceptable relative strengths; it provides fundamental interpretation of the physical forces. Further, it explains the basic mechanisms which can be identified with dark energy & dark matter. It also results to (or explains) entanglement, chirality, excess of matter, 4-component spinor, real-abstract (ontic-epistemic) correspondence etc. The theory is beyond standard model and results to the standard model, relativity, dark energy & dark matter, starting by simple assumptions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[38] viXra:1905.0245 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 01:29:32

Entangled Photon Gyroscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Fiber optic gyroscopes, which measure the rotation and orientation of airplanes and other moving objects, are inherently limited in their precision when using ordinary classical light. [37] Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[37] viXra:1905.0241 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 03:59:04

Iron-Based Superconductor Stabilized

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 16 Pages.

Iron-based superconductors (IBSCs) have attracted sustained research attention over the past decade, partly because new IBSCs were discovered one after another in the earlier years. [29] Important challenges in creating practical quantum computers have been addressed by two independent teams of physicists in the US. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[36] viXra:1905.0238 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 05:06:34

Atomic Wave Function Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details that describe an isolated quantum system, such as a gas of atoms, through direct observation. [35] Scientists at the University of Alberta have applied a machine learning technique using artificial intelligence to perfect and automate atomic-scale manufacturing, something which has never been done before. [34] Chemist Dr. Lars Borchardt and his team at TU Dresden recently achieved a huge breakthrough in the synthesis of nanographenes. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[35] viXra:1905.0233 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 08:19:33

Quantum Simulators can be Robust

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Digital quantum simulators might help, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems with few particles and only short simulation times. [32] 'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing. [31] For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. [30] Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications. [29] Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia, have demonstrated a 4000 kilometre fibre-optical transmission link using ultra low-noise, phase-sensitive optical amplifiers. [28] Researchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches. [27] In the new study, Bomantara and Gong have developed a method for harnessing the unique properties of time crystals for quantum computing that is based on braiding. [26] An Aalto University study has provided new evidence that time crystals can physically exist-a claim currently under hot debate. [25] Yale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal-a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse-in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[34] viXra:1905.0232 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 08:38:44

Quantum Light on Cave Art

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Leslie Van Gelder, a well-known American-born archeologist has been working with Dr. Harald Schwefel, and other physicists at Otago University to develop a lamp that mimics the flickering torch light that paleolithic cave artists worked by many thousands of years ago. [33] Digital quantum simulators might help, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems with few particles and only short simulation times. [32] 'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing. [31] For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. [30] Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications. [29] Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia, have demonstrated a 4000 kilometre fibre-optical transmission link using ultra low-noise, phase-sensitive optical amplifiers. [28] Researchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches. [27] In the new study, Bomantara and Gong have developed a method for harnessing the unique properties of time crystals for quantum computing that is based on braiding. [26] An Aalto University study has provided new evidence that time crystals can physically exist-a claim currently under hot debate. [25] Yale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal-a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse-in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[33] viXra:1905.0230 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 09:45:43

Holographic Quantum Interference

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

In conventional holography a photographic film can record the interference pattern of monochromatic light scattered from the object to be imaged with a reference beam of un-scattered light. [38] The scientists used the quantum nature of the electron-light interaction to separate the electron-reference and electron-imaging beams in energy instead of space. [37]
Category: Quantum Physics

[32] viXra:1905.0229 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 10:08:33

Capturing Single Photons for Quantum Information

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Yao-Lung (Leo) Fang, an assistant computational scientist with the Quantum Computing Group in Brookhaven's Computational Science Initiative and a co-author of the paper, explained that a particle occupying a stable bound state is confined in space, such as an electron orbiting a hydrogen atom. [26] MIT researchers have designed a way to generate, at room temperature, more single photons for carrying quantum information. The design, they say, holds promise for the development of practical quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[31] viXra:1905.0220 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-16 03:28:34

Summary of my Research Work

Authors: Savyasanchi Ghose
Comments: 10 Pages.

This document is for the readers who would like to look at my research work, the summary has been written in a brief format.
Category: Quantum Physics

[30] viXra:1905.0214 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-14 08:46:23

Single Photons for Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

MIT researchers have designed a way to generate, at room temperature, more single photons for carrying quantum information. The design, they say, holds promise for the development of practical quantum computers. [25] Operation at the single-photon level raises the possibility of developing entirely new communication and computing devices, ranging from hardware random number generators to quantum computers. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[29] viXra:1905.0212 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-14 10:04:53

Accelerating Quantum Technologies

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing. [31] For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. [30] Diamonds are prized for their purity, but their flaws might hold the key to a new type of highly secure communications. [29] Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia, have demonstrated a 4000 kilometre fibre-optical transmission link using ultra low-noise, phase-sensitive optical amplifiers. [28] Researchers at the University of York have shown that a new quantum-based procedure for distributing secure information along communication lines could be successful in preventing serious security breaches. [27] In the new study, Bomantara and Gong have developed a method for harnessing the unique properties of time crystals for quantum computing that is based on braiding. [26] An Aalto University study has provided new evidence that time crystals can physically exist-a claim currently under hot debate. [25] Yale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal-a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse-in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[28] viXra:1905.0206 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 01:03:03

New Type of Spin Waves

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

In this latest study, the German-Chinese research team describes a type of twisted magnon for which the twist or the winding number is protected against damping. [35] In a recently published paper in Science, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), were able to both excite and detect spin waves in a quantum Hall ferromagnet, demonstrating a new platform to investigate some of the possibilities of this promising material. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[27] viXra:1905.0205 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-15 01:22:52

Laser-Based Image Full Eye in 3-D

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 28 Pages.

Researchers supported by the EU-funded photonics innovation incubator ACTPHAST 4.0 have introduced "a swept light source technology that makes it possible to take full 3-D OCT [optical coherence tomography] images of the eye," says a news release posted on the project website. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[26] viXra:1905.0199 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-13 10:56:14

Two-Qubit Calculation in Silicon

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

For the first time ever, researchers have measured the fidelity-that is, the accuracy-of two-qubit logic operations in silicon, with highly promising results that will enable scaling up to a full-scale quantum processor. [36] These exotic particles can, for example, emerge as quasi-particles in topological superconductors and represent ideal building blocks for topological quantum computers. [35] This event is considered as a striking proof of the existence of Majorana particles, and it represents a crucial step towards their use as building blocks for the development of quantum computers. [34] In the latest experiment of its kind, researchers have captured the most compelling evidence to date that unusual particles lurk inside a special kind of superconductor. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[25] viXra:1905.0192 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-13 17:12:38

Stochastic, Granular, Five-Dimensional Space-Time:a Root Model for Both Relativity and Quantum Mechanics,and a New Interpretation of Time

Authors: Carlton Frederick
Comments: 27 Pages.

A stochastic model is presented for the Planck-scale nature of space-time. From it, many features of quantum mechanics and relativity are derived. As mathematical points have no extent, the stochastic manifold cannot be tessellated with points and so a granular model is required. For Lorentz invariance, the grains cannot have constant dimensions but instead, constant volumes. We treat both space and time stochastically and thus require a new interpretation of time to prevent an object being in multiple places at the same time. As the grains do have a definite volume, a mechanism is required to create and annihilate grains (without leaving gaps in space-time) as the universe, or parts thereof, expands or contracts. A 'rolled-up' fifth dimension provides the mechanism. As this is a 'root' model, it attempts to explicate phenomena usually taken for granted, such as gravity and the nature of time.
Category: Quantum Physics

[24] viXra:1905.0184 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-12 05:25:31

Optical Microring Sensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity. [31] Large-scale plasmonic metasurfaces could find use in flat panel displays and other devices that can change colour thanks to recent work by researchers at the University of Cambridge in the UK. [30] Particles in solution can grow, transport, collide, interact, and aggregate into complex shapes and structures. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[23] viXra:1905.0176 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-12 12:16:16

Wojciech H. Zurek . Decoherence and the Transition from Quantum to Classical - Revisited (in Russian)

Authors: V. Kasimov
Comments: 26 Pages. in Russian

If the Universe is considered to be a comprehensive and integral closed system (and otherwise it cannot be: for a complete system it is difficult to imagine the existence of any other entities that affect the integrity), then, according to the quantum paradigm, its evolution can be described by the vector of Hilbert space. The dimension of this space is not regulated by anything and it depends only on what fragment of integrity is described. Of course, the final form of this state vector will never be presented explicitly. However, the presented ideology makes it possible to state unambiguously that we live in the quantum world and according to quantum laws. Again revives insight Wheeler's: all from qubit quantum substrate! Article about it This article about that we live in a quantum world and how decoherence "glues" the visible world, and everything else is a facts from the qubits of pramatter.
Category: Quantum Physics

[22] viXra:1905.0167 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-11 07:20:36

Mechanic and Electrician Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

In strongly correlated materials such as cuprate high-temperature superconductors, superconductivity can be controlled either by changing the number of electrons or by changing the kinetic energy, or transfer energy, of electrons in the system. [34] Researchers have seen intrinsic superconductivity up to a temperature of 0.72 K in the transition metal dichalcogenide niobium telluride (NbTe2). [33] Researchers in France and Japan have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. [32] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have found that crystals of a recently discovered superconducting material, a layered bismuth chalcogenide with a four-fold symmetric structure, shows only twofold symmetry in its superconductivity. [31] Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity. [30] Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown that copper-based superconductors, or cuprates-the first class of materials found to carry electricity with no loss at relatively high temperatures-contain fluctuating stripes of electron charge and spin that meander like rivulets over rough ground. [29] Researchers from Google and the University of California Santa Barbara have taken an important step towards the goal of building a large-scale quantum computer. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27]
Category: Quantum Physics

[21] viXra:1905.0159 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-10 07:49:34

Mistery of Majorana Particles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

This event is considered as a striking proof of the existence of Majorana particles, and it represents a crucial step towards their use as building blocks for the development of quantum computers. [34] In the latest experiment of its kind, researchers have captured the most compelling evidence to date that unusual particles lurk inside a special kind of superconductor. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[20] viXra:1905.0148 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-09 11:51:39

Multiphoton Quantum States

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

The team created the quantum states in a silicon nanophotonic spiral waveguide to produce bright, tunable, stable and scalable multiphoton quantum states. [20] Researchers in Madrid, Spain, have now observed the quantization of electron energy levels in copper similar to the effects of confinement within a nanostructure, but in a copper sample with no nanoscale dimensions in the plane of the observed effects. [19] This method, called atomic spin squeezing, works by redistributing the uncertainty unevenly between two components of spin in these measurements systems, which operate at the quantum scale. [18] Researchers from the University of Cambridge have taken a peek into the secretive domain of quantum mechanics. [17] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity-spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[19] viXra:1905.0141 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-09 20:18:38

Wave-particle Duality of Macroscopic Particles

Authors: Mingshan Ye
Comments: 4 Pages. Quantum effect exists in macroscopic world

Different schools have different explanations for the wave-particle duality of microscopic particles. Hidden variable interpretation, pilot wave interpretation, stochastic processes interpretation and so on all think that the generation of wave-particle duality has deeper reasons. According to these interpretations, macroscopic objects can also exhibit significant wave-particle duality. The authors performed a "round-hole diffraction experiment of powder particles": some powder particles of the same mass and shape are freely dropped to a plane one by one through a circular hole. At first, the powder particles are distributed disorderly on the plate in the box. With the increase of the number of falling powder particles, a diffraction pattern composed of several concentric rings is gradually presented. This implies that wave-particle duality is not unique to microscopic particles, and it is also exhibited by macroscopic objects. The experimental results help to reveal the nature of wave-particle duality.
Category: Quantum Physics

[18] viXra:1905.0139 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-09 21:47:40

宏观物质颗粒的波粒二象性

Authors: 叶明山
Comments: 4 Pages. 宏观物质颗粒的波粒二象性

对于波粒二象性的本质,不同的学派有不同诠释。其中的隐变量诠释、导波诠释、随机过程诠释等都认为波粒二象性的产生有更深层的原因。根据这些诠释推论,宏观物体也可以呈现明显的波粒二象性。作者做了“粉末颗粒的圆孔衍射实验”:使一些质量相等、形状相同的粉末颗粒一颗一颗地通过一个圆孔自由下落到一个平面上,起初粉末颗粒在箱内平板上杂乱无章的分布,而随着落下的粉末颗粒数量增多,就逐渐呈现出由几个同心环组成的图样。实验结果表明波粒二象性不是微观粒子独有的特性,宏观物体也可以有波粒二象性。这个实验结果有助于揭示波粒二象性的本质。
Category: Quantum Physics

[17] viXra:1905.0135 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-08 07:13:51

New Material Quasiparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Researchers at PSI have investigated a novel crystalline material that exhibits electronic properties that have never been seen before. [36] Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. [35] For years, researchers have been trying to find ways to grow an optimal nanowire, using crystals with perfectly aligned layers all along the wire. [34] Ferroelectric materials have a spontaneous dipole moment which can point up or down. [33] Researchers have successfully demonstrated that hypothetical particles that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30] KU Leuven researchers from the Roeffaers Lab and the Hofkens Group have now put forward a very promising direct X-ray detector design, based on a rapidly emerging halide perovskite semiconductor, with chemical formula Cs2AgBiBr6. [29] Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate, thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[16] viXra:1905.0133 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-08 09:16:46

Bell's Inequality Superconducting Qubits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

The efficient generation of entanglement between remote quantum nodes is a crucial step in securing quantum communications. [29] Important challenges in creating practical quantum computers have been addressed by two independent teams of physicists in the US. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[15] viXra:1905.0124 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-09 03:41:37

Quantum Nanoconfinement Effects

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 32 Pages.

Researchers in Madrid, Spain, have now observed the quantization of electron energy levels in copper similar to the effects of confinement within a nanostructure, but in a copper sample with no nanoscale dimensions in the plane of the observed effects. [19] This method, called atomic spin squeezing, works by redistributing the uncertainty unevenly between two components of spin in these measurements systems, which operate at the quantum scale. [18] Researchers from the University of Cambridge have taken a peek into the secretive domain of quantum mechanics. [17] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity-spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[14] viXra:1905.0121 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-07 10:45:52

Graphene Plasmons Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

Physicists from the University of Vienna and the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona have shown that tailored graphene structures enable single photons to interact with each other. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41]
Category: Quantum Physics

[13] viXra:1905.0109 [pdf] replaced on 2019-05-20 05:41:01

De Wiskunde van de Fysieke Werkelijkheid

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 194 Pages. U kunt dit bestand naar een lokale print-shop brengen. Deze dienstverlener kan er dan een betaalbaar en gemakkelijk leesbaar A4-formaat ringband boek van maken.

Het belangrijkste onderwerp van dit boek is een puur wiskundig model van de fysieke werkelijkheid. Het boek fungeert als een overzicht van het Hilbert Book Model project. Het project betreft een goed gefundeerd, puur wiskundig model van fysische realiteit. Het project berust op de overtuiging dat de fysieke werkelijkheid zijn eigen soort van wiskunde bezit en dat deze wiskunde de uitbreiding van het fundament tot meer gecompliceerde niveaus van de structuur en het gedrag van de fysieke werkelijkheid begeleid en inperkt. Dit resulteert in een model dat meer en meer lijkt op de fysieke werkelijkheid die mensen kunnen observeren. Het boek behandelt verschillende onderwerpen die rechtstreeks verband houden met het hoofdonderwerp. Het boek introduceert nieuwe fysica en nieuwe wiskunde.
Category: Quantum Physics

[12] viXra:1905.0108 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-08 03:25:11

Ultra-Secure Virtual Money

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge. [25] Shortcomings of security breach notifications, best practices for phishing warnings and lessons learned from the use of analytics to improve student performance are among several studies University of Michigan researchers will present beginning this weekend in the United Kingdom. [24] But moral questions about what data should be collected and how it should be used are only the beginning. [23] A self-driving vehicle has to detect objects, track them over time, and predict where they will be in the future in order to plan a safe manoeuvre. [22] In order to improve world food conditions, a team around computer science professor Kristian Kersting was inspired by the technology behind Google News. [21] Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is one of a number of biophysical techniques used for determining the structural characteristics of biomolecules. [20] A deep neural network running on an ordinary desktop computer is interpreting highly technical data related to national security as well as-and sometimes better than-today's best automated methods or even human experts. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[11] viXra:1905.0103 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-06 11:47:28

Holographic Quantum Computation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

The scientists used the quantum nature of the electron-light interaction to separate the electron-reference and electron-imaging beams in energy instead of space. [37] A holographic acoustic tweezers (HAT) system has been used to suspend up to 25 objects in mid-air simultaneously. [36] Holography is a powerful tool that can reconstruct wavefronts of light and combine the fundamental wave properties of amplitude, phase, polarization, wave vector and frequency. [35] Physicist Artem Rudenko from Kansas State University and his colleagues pondered how to improve the images of viruses and microparticles that scientists get from X-rays. [34] A team of materials scientists from Penn State, Cornell and Argonne National Laboratory have, for the first time, visualized the 3-D atomic and electron density structure of the most complex perovskite crystal structure system decoded to date. [33] Hydrogen-powered electronics, travel, and more may be a step closer thanks to the work of a collaborative team of scientists in Japan. [32] "The realization of such all-optical single-HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/information+processing/" information processing," says Tanji-Suzuki. [31] Researchers at ETH have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. [30] A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. [29] A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality-a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[10] viXra:1905.0102 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-06 13:26:19

Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

Researchers have developed a simple and stable device to generate the quantum states necessary for quantum key distribution. [41] A collaborative team, led by scientists from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), developed a highly-sensitive nano-thermometer that uses atom-like inclusions in diamond nanoparticles to accurately measure temperature at the nanoscale. [40] Imagine being able to shape a pulse of light in any conceivable manner-compressing it, stretching it, splitting it in two, changing its intensity or altering the direction of its electric field. [39] When exposed to intense laser pulses, the magnetization of a material can be manipulated very fast. [38] A new laser-pointing platform developed at MIT may help launch miniature satellites into the high-rate data game. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[9] viXra:1905.0093 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-05 10:12:42

Antimatter Quantum Interferometry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Researchers in Italy and Switzerland have performed the first ever double-slit-like experiment on antimatter using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a positron beam. [26] Two new experiments at CERN, ALPHA-g and GBAR, have now started their journey towards answering this question. [25] Mysterious radiation emitted from distant corners of the galaxy could finally be explained with efforts to recreate a unique state of matter that blinked into existence in the first moments after the Big Bang. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[8] viXra:1905.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-05 21:16:49

A Physical Explanation for Particle Spin

Authors: Dirk Pons, Arion Pons, Aiden Pons
Comments: 25 Pages.

CONTEXT - The spin of a particle is physically manifest in multiple phenomena. For quantum mechanics (QM), spin is an intrinsic property of a point particle, but an ontological explanation is lacking. In this paper we propose a physical explanation for spin at the sub-particle level, using a non-local hidden-variable (NLHV) theory. APPROACH - Mechanisms for spin were inferred from the Cordus NLHV theory, specifically from theorised structures at the sub-particle level. RESULTS – Physical geometry of the particle can explain spin phenomena: polarisation, Pauli exclusion principle (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox), excited states, and selective spin of neutrino species. A quantitative derivation is provided for electron spin g-factor g = 2, and a qualitative explanation for the anomalous component. IMPLICATIONS - NLHV theory offers a candidate route to new physics at the sub-particle level. This also implies philosophically that physical realism may apply to physics at the deeper level below QM. ORIGINALITY – The electron g-factor has been derived using sub-particle structures in NLHV theory, without using quantum theory. This is significant as the g-factor is otherwise considered uniquely predicted by QM. Explanations are provided for spin phenomena in terms of physical sub-structures to the particle.
Category: Quantum Physics

[7] viXra:1905.0077 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-04 09:21:22

Quantum Light at the Nanoscale

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

A collaborative team, led by scientists from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), developed a highly-sensitive nano-thermometer that uses atom-like inclusions in diamond nanoparticles to accurately measure temperature at the nanoscale. [40] Imagine being able to shape a pulse of light in any conceivable manner—compressing it, stretching it, splitting it in two, changing its intensity or altering the direction of its electric field. [39] When exposed to intense laser pulses, the magnetization of a material can be manipulated very fast. [38]
Category: Quantum Physics

[6] viXra:1905.0075 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-04 10:08:07

Diamonds for Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

Nanodiamonds doped with such elements could be applied to quantum information science—a rapidly expanding field that includes quantum communication and quantum computing. [41] A collaborative team, led by scientists from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), developed a highly-sensitive nano-thermometer that uses atom-like inclusions in diamond nanoparticles to accurately measure temperature at the nanoscale. [40]
Category: Quantum Physics

[5] viXra:1905.0054 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-03 08:52:16

Particle Simulation Quantum Leap

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 81 Pages.

A group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab has figured out how to use quantum computing to simulate the fundamental interactions that hold together our universe. [47] Phonons, or more specifically, surface acoustic wave phonons, are proposed as a method to coherently couple distant solid-state quantum systems. [46] Now a Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has teamed up with experts at the University of Rochester to create a different kind of laser-a laser for sound, using the optical tweezer technique invented by Ashkin. [45]
Category: Quantum Physics

[4] viXra:1905.0053 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-03 09:25:18

Laser-Driven Spin Dynamics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

When exposed to intense laser pulses, the magnetization of a material can be manipulated very fast. [38] A new laser-pointing platform developed at MIT may help launch miniature satellites into the high-rate data game. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[3] viXra:1905.0050 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-03 10:31:40

Photons Quantum Sensor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Researchers led by Tracy Northup at the University of Innsbruck have now built a quantum sensor that can measure light particles non-destructively. [22] A study by the Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has produced a series of protocols for quantum sensors that could allow images to be obtained by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of single biomolecules using a minimal amount of radiation. [21] An international team of physicists at ETH Zurich, Aalto University, the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow has demonstrated that algorithms and hardware developed originally in the context of quantum computation can be harnessed for quantum-enhanced sensing of magnetic fields. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2] viXra:1905.0043 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-02 12:02:10

Phonon-Mediated Qubit Entanglement

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

Phonons, or more specifically, surface acoustic wave phonons, are proposed as a method to coherently couple distant solid-state quantum systems. [46] Now a Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has teamed up with experts at the University of Rochester to create a different kind of laser-a laser for sound, using the optical tweezer technique invented by Ashkin. [45]
Category: Quantum Physics

[1] viXra:1905.0025 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-01 06:59:59

Quantum Bits with Sound

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

Scientists with the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have made two breakthroughs in the quest to develop quantum technology. [44] A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by Professor Guido Burkard and his team of physicists at the University of Konstanz. [43] As the number of hacks and security breaches rapidly climbs, scientists say there may be a way to make a truly unhackable network by using the laws of quantum physics. [42] This world-first nanophotonic device, just unveiled in Nature Communications, encodes more data and processes it much faster than conventional fiber optics by using a special form of 'twisted' light. [41] Purdue University researchers created a new technique that would increase the secret bit rate 100-fold, to over 35 million photons per second. [40] Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems. [39] Research in the quantum optics lab of Prof. Barak Dayan in the Weizmann Institute of Science may be bringing the development of such computers one step closer by providing the "quantum gates" that are required for communication within and between such quantum computers. [38] Calculations of a quantum system's behavior can spiral out of control when they involve more than a handful of particles. [37] Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have reached a new milestone on the way to optical computing, or the use of light instead of electricity for computing. [36] The key technical novelty of this work is the creation of semantic embeddings out of structured event data. [35]
Category: Quantum Physics