Quantum Physics

1803 Submissions

[95] viXra:1803.0750 [pdf] replaced on 2018-07-17 06:35:40

Metric Science

Authors: Gerhard Jan Smit, Jelle Ebel van der Schoot
Comments: 84 Pages.

In this article a particle is being presented that explains all known forces of nature. The particle has no dimensions, it is a dimensional basic particle. Hence it gets the following name: 'dimensional basic' (db) particle. The core of this discovery is that the separate fundamental forces of nature: - the strong interaction, the electromagnetic interaction, the weak interaction and the gravitational interaction - are calculatable with one formula out of one principle. The statistical math of the quantum theory is set aside in favor of a goniometric approach. Gravitation is the only force that matters and the strong force, the electromagnetic force and the weak force can be explained out of gravitation while gravity itself is only caused by the curvature of db's. The formula for the extent of curvature around a db is: √(x2+y2+z2)×=1 In the formula: x, y, z, are coordinates in spacetime [m], Kr = curvature [m-1].
Category: Quantum Physics

[94] viXra:1803.0723 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 19:33:34

A Review on Entanglement and Maxwell-Dirac Isomorphism

Authors: Victor Christianto, Florentin Smarandache
Comments: 8 Pages. This paper has been submitted to Prespacetime Journal. Your comments are welcome

In RG forum, one senior professor of physics posted a project called: “Future science and technology.” As a response, one of us (VC) wrote in reply: “I think one of future science's tasks is to discover the link between entanglement and classical electromagnetic theory. This is to fulfill Einstein's position that present QM theory is incomplete, a new one must be found. We are on a way to that goal.” Therefore, in this paper we will discuss how entanglement can be explained in terms of Maxwell-Dirac isomorphism. This short review may be considered as Einstein’s dream of completing QM in a classical picture.
Category: Quantum Physics

[93] viXra:1803.0720 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 19:42:23

On Fundamental Flaws of Everett’s Many Worlds Interpretation of QM, and Plausible Resolution based on Maxwell-Dirac Isomorphism

Authors: Victor Christianto, Florentin Smarandache
Comments: 10 Pages. This paper has been submitted to a journal. Comments are welcome

Despite its enormous practical success, many physicists and philosophers alike agree that the quantum theory is so full of contradictions and paradoxes which are difficult to solve consistently. Even after 90 years, the experts themselves still do not all agree what to make of it. The area of disagreement centers primarily around the problem of describing observations. Formally, the so-called quantum measurement problem can be defined as follows: the result of a measurement is a superposition of vectors, each representing the quantity being observed as having one of its possible values. The question that has to be answered is how this superposition can be reconciled with the fact that in practice we only observe one value. How is the measuring instrument prodded into making up its mind which value it has observed? Among some alternatives to resolve the above QM measurement problem, a very counterintuitive one was suggested by Hugh Everett III in his 1955 dissertation, which was subsequently called the Many-Worlds Interpretation of QM (MWI). In this paper we will not discuss all possible scenarios to solve the measurement problem, but we will only shortly discuss Everett’s MWI, because it has led to spurious debates on possibility of multiverses, beyond the Universe we live in. We also discuss two alternatives against MWI proposal: (a) the so-called scale symmetry theory, (b) the Maxwell-Dirac isomorphism.
Category: Quantum Physics

[92] viXra:1803.0712 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 08:06:56

OpenFermion Quantum Computer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

A collaboration of scientists led by Google, and including physicists from Leiden University and TU Delft, have developed a practice tool for chemists called OpenFermion. [28] Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are conducting fundamental physics research that will lead to more control over mercurial quantum systems and materials. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient.
Category: Quantum Physics

[91] viXra:1803.0711 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 09:11:31

Simplest Refutation of Bell's Inequality © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Right Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All right reserved. info@cec-services dot com

See within
Category: Quantum Physics

[90] viXra:1803.0705 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 14:02:19

How Magnets Work :an Alternative Explanation

Authors: Fenton J. Doolan
Comments: 4 pages

In Science we explain that a magnet work by the assumption it consists of small entities called domains. The orientation these 'small magnets' or domains determines whether or not the metal will be magnetised or not. So in essence in Science we explain how magnets work by saying they are made up of little magnets. This paper discuss an alternate explanation of how magnets work. We invoke an electromagnetic explanation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[89] viXra:1803.0691 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 05:44:41

Laser Control of Electrons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[88] viXra:1803.0688 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 09:01:46

Charging Quantum Batteries

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Some physicists are now wondering whether quantum phenomena may revolutionize conventional battery chemistry and lead to the development of an entirely new class of potentially more powerful batteries. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[87] viXra:1803.0687 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 09:32:11

Causal Order in Quantum Mechanics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[86] viXra:1803.0683 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 11:26:32

Molecular Prison Forces

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

A team of scientists including Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules, H2, trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it. [32] A potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[85] viXra:1803.0682 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 13:25:33

Subatomic Computational Microscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Scientists have built a "computational microscope" that can simulate the atomic and subatomic forces that drive molecular interactions. [35] Researchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons. [34] Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[84] viXra:1803.0671 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-26 11:49:52

Materials for Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[83] viXra:1803.0665 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-14 03:23:59

Dealing with Optical Fibers in General Relativity

Authors: Ll. Bel
Comments: 5 Pages. Errata and minor errors correctrd

An example of how optical fibers can clarify the influence of a gravitational field on the propagation of light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[82] viXra:1803.0664 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 05:07:03

Quasicrystal Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Now, in a study in Nature Communications, a research team led by Nagoya University has discovered superconductivity in a QC for the first time. [37] University of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[81] viXra:1803.0662 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 06:36:52

Energy from Fluctuation of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[80] viXra:1803.0659 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 07:37:52

Self-Assembling Quantum Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

A potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[79] viXra:1803.0657 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-25 13:17:52

Global Madness

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 6 Pages.

Humanity is in danger, physicists are blinded by unrealistic theories/conclusions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[78] viXra:1803.0645 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-26 05:25:31

Formulation of Dirac Equation for an Arbitrary Field from a System of Linear First Order Partial Differential Equations

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 5 Pages.

In our previous works we formulated Dirac equation for a free quantum particle and Maxwell field equations for the electromagnetic field from a system of linear first order partial differential equations. In this work we show that it is possible to formulate Dirac equation for the case when the quantum particle is under the influence of an external field, such as the electromagnetic field, also from a system of linear first order partial differential equations.
Category: Quantum Physics

[77] viXra:1803.0634 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-23 22:47:05

Harmonic Unity of Atom Spectrum

Authors: Oleg G. Verin
Comments: 22 Pages.

Recent discovery of the laws of atomic electron shells formation [1] enables to have absolutely new view at the nature of atom spectrum. In particular, the fractional values of a main quantum number testify to excitation of multiple resonances of electronic shells of atoms making for each atom a «special» spectrum. In spite of all diversity of characteristics the regularities showing harmonic unity of each atom clearly appear, that, undoubtedly, becomes reliable guiding line for researchers and will be useful at the analysis and systematization of atomic spectrums. This article is a continuation of study of atomic electron shells properties on the basis of reference data confirmed by trusty experiments.
Category: Quantum Physics

[76] viXra:1803.0628 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-24 07:01:39

Jupiter and the Inverter Magnet Mechanism

Authors: Fenton J. Doolan
Comments: 2 pages

It is hypothesised that Jupiter acts like a gigantic inverter magnet. The recent infrared images of Jupiter north and south poles from the orbiting satellite Juno clearly show 'cyclones' that form the inverter magnet structure. It is thus concluded that the sun and all planets in our solar system ( except possibly Venus ) are acting like inverter magnets. The force of attraction between heavenly bodies is magnetic or electromagnetic in nature.
Category: Quantum Physics

[75] viXra:1803.0626 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-24 09:21:10

A New Approach to Quantum Mechanics I :Overview

Authors: Juno Ryu
Comments: 33 Pages.

In this article, a new topological way to define first quantization procedure is overviewed. Technical ingredients and metaphysical ideas used throughout this series of works are introduced in a way as non-technical as possible for motivating both physically and mathematically interested readers. This overview contains schematic summary of part II and part III of this series.
Category: Quantum Physics

[74] viXra:1803.0544 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-23 13:38:18

3-D Single-Atom Measurements

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Researchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons. [34] Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing. [27] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[73] viXra:1803.0395 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-15 11:49:58

Massa uit het Niets

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. Dit behoort bij het Hilbert Book Model project

Massa blijkt een vluchtige eigenschap te zijn die uit het niets lijkt voort te komen en snel verwatert in het toenemende volume van het universum
Category: Quantum Physics

[72] viXra:1803.0388 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-04 12:06:15

Generating Mass from Nothing

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. This belongs to the Hilbert Book Model Project

Having mass stands for having the capability to deform the living space of the owner of the mass. This description makes mass a very transient property that recurrently must be regenerated because deformations spread over the living space. Consequently, deformations quickly fade away. It looks as if mass generates out of nothing and then dilutes into nothing. Due to their simple structure, the generation of electrons encounters little problems. This enables the computation of the generation rate of their constituents.
Category: Quantum Physics

[71] viXra:1803.0385 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 14:34:33

Diamond Maser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Lead researcher Dr Jonathan Breeze, from Imperial's Department of Materials, said: "This breakthrough paves the way for the widespread adoption of masers and opens the door for a wide array of applications that we are keen to explore. We hope the maser will now enjoy as much success as the laser." [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[70] viXra:1803.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 05:24:45

Crystal Lattice from Polaritons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

An international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from polaritons, hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[69] viXra:1803.0372 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 07:30:24

High-Speed Quantum Internet

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have rediscovered a material that could be the basis for ultra-high-speed quantum internet. [38] A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[68] viXra:1803.0363 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 07:52:52

Ultra - Light Communication an be Achieved Immediately

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 19 Pages.

Through the analysis of several key experiments, the influence of the detector's advantages and disadvantages on the micro world is demonstrated.and the interaction of the photons is pointed out. This interaction is not a superdistance force, but it can indeed be faster than the speed of light. It determines the interference of the photon, using it to achieve superlight communication.
Category: Quantum Physics

[67] viXra:1803.0354 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 08:17:29

Time Scale on Optical Clock

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

(NICT) generated a real-time signal of an accurate time scale by combining an optical lattice clock and a hydrogen maser. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[66] viXra:1803.0338 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 09:16:18

Double Life Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Now scientists have probed the superconducting behavior of its electrons in detail for the first time. They discovered it's even weirder than they thought. Yet that's good news, they said, because it gives them a new angle for thinking about what's known as "high temperature" superconductivity, a phenomenon that could be harnessed for a future generation of perfectly efficient power lines, levitating trains and other revolutionary technologies. [36] University of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[65] viXra:1803.0312 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 08:28:04

Two Dimensions Quantum Bits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Two novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, are the ingredients for a novel kind of quantum dot. [28] A "superacid" much stronger than automobile battery acid has enabled a key advance toward a new generation of LED lighting that's safer, less expensive and more user friendly. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[64] viXra:1803.0307 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 11:40:13

Electron Spi 1/2 is "Hidden" Electromagnetic Field Angular Momentum

Authors: U. Kayser-Herold
Comments: 5 Pages.

This is to present and discuss an alternative method for precise analytical determination of electron spin angular momentum 1/2. The method is based on the Lorentz-force acting on a point-like charge moved through the entire magnetic dipole-field of the electron. The result hbar/2 coincides with a previous result based on Lagrangian electrodynamics and confirms the "hidden" electromagnetic origin of spin angular momentum. Both methods reveal a key role of the "classical" electron radius.
Category: Quantum Physics

[63] viXra:1803.0302 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 14:05:15

Flying Microlaser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[62] viXra:1803.0292 [pdf] replaced on 2018-07-03 19:48:25

Phoson’s Theory (a New Theory of Quantization, Electrons’ Generation by Waves, Electrons’ Structure, Relativistic Mass and Conflict with De Broglie’s Theory)

Authors: Yaseen Ali Mohamed Al Azzam
Comments: Pages.

By an alternative interpretation of Compton effect experiment, I concluded that waves can generate electrons and that waves are quantized into units of mass (which I called phosons). A phoson is a fundamental unit of energy carrying mass and the origin of quantization while Photons are a misconception in interpreting the photoelectric experiment. I concluded a model to describe the particles’ behavior of phosons based on describing its propagation as a continuous interchange of two type of energies (spinning and translational) and a mass variation proportional to the translational kinetic energy. Also, I concluded a model that explains how electrons are comprised of phosons besides the role of these phosons in giving the electron its mass, energy and shape. Since my theories state that phosons do have mass and the nature of the concluded electron’s structure contradicts with the definition of relativistic mass according to the theory of relativity and with De Broglie’s theory in describing the wave behavior of the electron, I discussed both theories showing how both failed to describe the electron’s properties and behavior. The electron- wave interrelation explains how the properties of each is originated by the other, accordingly the calculation of some of the electron’s properties like its intrinsic angular velocity from wave parameters and the unquantized intrinsic angular momentum and magnetic moment became much clearer.
Category: Quantum Physics

[61] viXra:1803.0281 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-19 09:19:57

The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Detector

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 16 Pages.

Through the analysis of several key experiments, this paper makes an in-depth demonstration.The impact of the detector on the micro world,Make it clear to the reader.The truth of wave-particle duality.
Category: Quantum Physics

[60] viXra:1803.0279 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-19 12:19:56

New Platforms for Quantum Circuitry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

If a metal or other conductive material could be made to resemble such a kagome pattern at the atomic scale, with individual atoms arranged in similar triangular patterns, it should in theory exhibit exotic electronic properties. [21] Each individual molecule can conduct electrons. This phenomenon is interesting because the conducting molecules produce unique quantum properties that could potentially be useful in electronics such as transistors, superconducting switches and gas sensors. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14] For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. [13] Physicists have shown that the three main types of engines (four-stroke, twostroke, and continuous) are thermodynamically equivalent in a certain quantum regime, but not at the classical level. [12]
Category: Quantum Physics

[59] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-07 05:24:07

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 17 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe.
Category: Quantum Physics

[58] viXra:1803.0262 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-22 04:41:26

Double Slit Experiment

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 2 Pages.

The double slit experiment has a measurement problem, physicists believe that the results are magical but they are not. They don't realize that there is a hidden element in that experiment, those interference waves are not created by the particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[57] viXra:1803.0239 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-17 02:59:08

Maxwell Field Equations in Euclidean Relativity

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 8 Pages.

In this work we formulate Maxwell field equations in Euclidean relativity. Since there is no upper limit for the speed of transmission in Euclidean relativity, the Euclidean relativistic electromagnetic field and the Euclidean relativistic Dirac field may be applied to rectify the EPR paradox in quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[56] viXra:1803.0233 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 07:55:12

Quantum Spin Liquid Prepared

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[55] viXra:1803.0231 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 09:33:47

Diodes Made of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

'Haye and his team at NPL have created an optical version of a diode that transmits light in one direction only, and can be integrated in microphotonic circuits. [25] Operation at the single-photon level raises the possibility of developing entirely new communication and computing devices, ranging from hardware random number generators to quantum computers. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16] Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[54] viXra:1803.0230 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 10:02:19

Spin-Based Memory Storage

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

A voltage sensing scheme developed by researchers from Singapore could improve the accuracy of reading data from spin-based memory systems with only minimal modifications. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[53] viXra:1803.0220 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 02:37:45

Compact Fiber Optic Sensor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Researchers have developed a new flexible sensor with high sensitivity that is designed to perform variety of chemical and biological analyses in very small spaces. [37] In a new paper published today in Science Advances, researchers under the direction of Columbia Engineering Professors Michal Lipson and Alexander Gaeta (Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics) have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized chip. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[52] viXra:1803.0218 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 06:27:40

Magnon Spin Currents

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

In the emerging field of magnon spintronics, researchers seek to transport and process information by means of so-called magnon spin currents. [25] Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[51] viXra:1803.0217 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 08:22:32

On the Dark Covering Capacity of Light and the Unification of Dark with Light

Authors: Tejas Chandrakant Thakare.
Comments: 10 Pages.

Light has properties such as polarization, interference, diffraction etc. This paper presents the new property of light and its relation with dark. This relation also useful for describing dark in terms of light`s parameter. We treated dark as absence of light but this paper presents dark`s systematical description and hence presents dark`s relation with light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[50] viXra:1803.0216 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 09:14:20

No Actually Quantum Speed Limits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

The results are surprising, as previous research has suggested that quantum speed limits are purely quantum in nature and vanish for classical systems. [30] In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only so closely together, before they overlap or short-circuit. If companies are to continue building ever-faster computers, something will need to change. [29] This new understanding of the origin of magnetic flux noise could lead to frequency-tunable superconducting qubits with improved dephasing times for practical quantum computers. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits—circuits that have zero electrical resistance—can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[49] viXra:1803.0209 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 13:08:18

Single Molecule Electrical Conductance

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Each individual molecule can conduct electrons. This phenomenon is interesting because the conducting molecules produce unique quantum properties that could potentially be useful in electronics such as transistors, superconducting switches and gas sensors. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14] For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. [13] Physicists have shown that the three main types of engines (four-stroke, twostroke, and continuous) are thermodynamically equivalent in a certain quantum regime, but not at the classical level. [12] For the first time, physicists have performed an experiment confirming that thermodynamic processes are irreversible in a quantum system—meaning that, even on the quantum level, you can't put a broken egg back into its shell. The results have implications for understanding thermodynamics in quantum systems and, in turn, designing quantum computers and other quantum information technologies. [11]
Category: Quantum Physics

[48] viXra:1803.0203 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 03:53:57

Cold Plasma Quantum Mechanics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

University of British Columbia researchers have found a new system that could help yield 'warmer' quantum technologies. [38] A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[47] viXra:1803.0201 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-27 05:50:10

Refutation of the Pauli Exclusion Principle © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The generalized and specific forms of the Pauli exclusion principle are separately not tautologous and jointly not equivalent. A weakening of the argument by using the implication connective fails.
Category: Quantum Physics

[46] viXra:1803.0199 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 06:13:56

Quantum Simulation of Topological Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Symmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. [25] Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[45] viXra:1803.0197 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 09:37:08

Steep Quantum Walls for Atoms

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Now, a team of scientists from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), in collaboration with researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Innsbruck, Austria, has circumvented the wavelength limit by leveraging the atoms' inherent quantum features, which should allow atomic lattice neighbors to get closer than ever before. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[44] viXra:1803.0193 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 12:43:36

Researchers at Mit and Harvard University Found that Photons Interaction Proved the Theory I Proposed More Than 20 Years Ago

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 4 Pages.

Remind people to pay attention to it,The most influential scientific journal of the 2017, science,Points out the articles in the journal Science,It proves Cui Hailong's theory more than 20 years ago.The latest experiment introduced in this article is a big step in the right direction.
Category: Quantum Physics

[43] viXra:1803.0190 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-13 07:42:57

Electric Charge is not a Seperate Entity

Authors: Ranganath G Kulkarni
Comments: 1 Page.

The quantization of energy is due to the existence of smallest unit of energy. This leads to quantization of electric charge. We find that electric charge is equivalent to mass.
Category: Quantum Physics

[42] viXra:1803.0183 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-13 11:10:25

Quantum Communication

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 7 Pages.

Great theories give birth to great industries, ignoring my theory, Will make America lose its great 20 years, lost hundreds of thousands of billion dollar industry, this is not the American people are willing to see, is not allowed by the American people, it's not your responsibility is allowed My theory is that, The theory that immediately makes quantum communication possible,Not a quantum key,Instead, quantum communication,Quantum keys can be cracked,Quantum communication is the only thing Our goal.
Category: Quantum Physics

[41] viXra:1803.0172 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 09:30:15

Polarizations as States and Their Evolution in Geometric Algebra Terms with Variable Complex Plane

Authors: Alexander Soiguine
Comments: 10 Pages.

Recently suggested scheme of quantum computing uses g-qubit states as circular polarizations from the solution of Maxwell equations in terms of geometric algebra, along with clear definition of a complex plane as bivector in three dimensions. Here all the details of receiving the solution, and its polarization transformations are analyzed. The results can particularly be applied to the problems of quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The suggested formalism replaces conventional quantum mechanics states as objects constructed in complex vector Hilbert space framework by geometrically feasible framework of multivectors.
Category: Quantum Physics

[40] viXra:1803.0167 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 11:21:36

Quantum Magnetic Wave

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[39] viXra:1803.0162 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 04:14:01

A Decisive Experiment

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 4 Pages.

By reviewing the history of science, we discussed the criteria of testing science theory, criticized the most fashionable concept in twentieth Century, and put forward a concrete plan to achieve super light speed communication.
Category: Quantum Physics

[38] viXra:1803.0160 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 05:44:31

Metastable Quantum Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

The phenomenon of metastability, in which a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy, is widely observed in nature and technology. [25] Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[37] viXra:1803.0155 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 09:51:26

How Laser Start from Chaos

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[36] viXra:1803.0153 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 11:07:41

Ultra-Cold Quantum Gas

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[35] viXra:1803.0151 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-18 13:46:53

A Speculative Relationship Between the Proton Mass, the Proton Radius, and the Fine Structure Constant and Between the Fine Structure Constant and the Hagedorn Temperature

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this short note we present a possible connection between the proton radius and the proton mass using the fine structure constant. The Hagedorn temperature is related to the energy levels assumed to be required to free the quarks from the proton, where hadronic matter is unstable. We also speculate that there could be a connection between the Hagedorn temperature and the Planck temperature through the fine structure constant. Whether there is something to this, or it is purely a coincidence, we will leave to others and future research to explore. However, we think these possible relationships are worth further investigation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[34] viXra:1803.0146 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 03:26:27

Crisis in Quantum Field Theory and Its Overcoming (Axiomatic Approach Versus Heuristic)

Authors: Kyriakos A.G.
Comments: 24 Pages.

Many known scientists have noted the presence of crisis in fundamental physics. Despite mathematical success, quantum theory not answers many questions that are asked by scientists. Which of our basic physical assumptions are wrong? What we need to change? The proposed article tries to answer these questions using a new approach.
Category: Quantum Physics

[33] viXra:1803.0143 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-10 06:57:13

Refutation of Tensor Product and Bernstein-Vazirani Algorithm © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

The tensor product and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm are sequentially refuted.
Category: Quantum Physics

[32] viXra:1803.0139 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-10 10:37:38

Quantum Photonic Technology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[31] viXra:1803.0137 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 16:16:33

On EPR Paradox and Matter Wave in Euclidean Relativity

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 7 Pages.

: In our previous works, we showed that the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox could be resolved by constructing a Euclidean relativity that not only leads to the same results obtained from Einstein general relativity but also permits an instantaneous transmission of interaction. However, there still remains the question about the nature of these physical fields and their mathematical formulations if they exist. In this work we show that it is possible to formulate Euclidean relativistic field equations similar Dirac equation from a general system of linear first order partial differential equation. Since the speeds of the Euclidean relativistic fields have no upper values, they can be used to rectify the quantum entanglement in quantum mechanics.
Category: Quantum Physics

[30] viXra:1803.0126 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 07:39:07

Visibility into Quantum Information Transfer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[29] viXra:1803.0125 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 08:22:53

The Generalized Bernstein-Vazirani Algorithm for Determining an Integer String

Authors: Koji Nagata, Tadao Nakamura, Han Geurdes, Josep Batle, Ahmed Farouk, Do Ngoc Diep
Comments: 3 pages

We present the generalized Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm for determining a restricted integer string. Given the set of real values $\{a_1,a_2,a_3,\ldots,a_N\}$ and a function $g:{\bf R}\rightarrow {\bf Z}$, we shall determine the following values $\{g(a_1),g(a_2),g(a_3),\ldots, g(a_N)\}$ simultaneously. The speed of determining the values is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of $N$. The method determines the maximum of and the minimum of the function $g$ that the finite domain is $\{a_1,a_2,a_3,\ldots,a_N\}$.
Category: Quantum Physics

[28] viXra:1803.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 11:42:29

Topological Superconductor Solve Decoherence in Quantum Computers

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 14 Pages.

A team of researchers from Japan, the U.S. and China, has identified a topological superconducting phase for possible use in an iron-based material in quantum computers. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits—circuits that have zero electrical resistance—can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[27] viXra:1803.0113 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 04:18:41

Entangled Quantum Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[26] viXra:1803.0107 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-08 10:32:37

Light-Speed Electron with Laser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

A paper published in the journal Physical Review X presents evidence of a radiation reaction occurring when a high-intensity laser pulse collides with a high-energy electron beam. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[25] viXra:1803.0101 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-07 05:41:57

Precision Atom Qubits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[24] viXra:1803.0099 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-07 08:52:21

Maxwell's Demon in Quantum Zeno

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

It's well-known that when a quantum system is continuously measured, it freezes, i.e., it stops changing, which is due to a phenomenon called the quantum Zeno effect. [18] Physicists have extended one of the most prominent fluctuation theorems of classical stochastic thermodynamics, the Jarzynski equality, to quantum field theory. [17] In 1993, physicist Lucien Hardy proposed an experiment showing that there is a small probability (around 6-9%) of observing a particle and its antiparticle interacting with each other without annihilating—something that is impossible in classical physics. [16] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity—spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[23] viXra:1803.0084 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 11:03:37

Light and Matter Coupling

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[22] viXra:1803.0080 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 14:23:55

Refutation of Quantum Computing on the Unitary Operator © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

The standard unitary operator is not tautologous. It can be coerced into tautology with two steps: 1. Reversing the order of the antecedent with the consequent in the equivalency; and 2. Replacing the equivalence connective with the implication connective. However, that result is not quantum computing as universally defined, but something else.
Category: Quantum Physics

[21] viXra:1803.0076 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 01:44:19

Finite Statistics Loophole in CH, Eberhard, CHSH Inequalities

Authors: Justin Lee
Comments: 16 Pages.

Clauser-Horne (CH) inequality, Eberhard inequality, and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality are used to determine whether quantum entanglement can contradict local realism. However, the "finite statistics" loophole is known to allow local realism to violate these inequalities if a sample size is small [1]. Remarkably though, this paper shows that this loophole in conjunction with an improper statistical analysis and incorrect singles counts can cause a violation of Eberhard inequality even with a large sample size, e.g. a 13 sigma violation was achieved despite 12,000,000 total trials in a Monte Carlo simulation of a local realist photonic experiment, and furthermore, a 27 sigma violation was produced when a small, acceptable 0.2% production rate loophole was applied. In order to properly analyze the data, a sample mean of Eberhard inequality values should be used to calculate the statistical strength, instead of using an aggregate Eberhard inequality value, and the correct singles counts should be used. Secondly, this paper shows that if a sample size does not far exceed the "large enough" value for the normal approximation of a Binomial distribution, it can still violate these inequalities, e.g. CHSH violation of 2:43 +/- 0:31 was achieved with 280 total trials and 2:16 +/- 0:13 even with 3,000 total trials. This paper introduces the aforementioned loopholes as plausible local realist explanations to two observed violations reported by Giustina, et al. [2], and Hensen, et al. [3].
Category: Quantum Physics

[20] viXra:1803.0073 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 03:20:57

Graphene Insulator or Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Excitonmediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[19] viXra:1803.0064 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 10:29:44

Seeing the Quantum World

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[18] viXra:1803.0060 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 00:13:14

Brief Primer on the Fundaments of Quantum Computing

Authors: Richard L Amoroso
Comments: 140 Pages.

This QC primer is based on excerpts from the breakthrough volume Universal Quantum Computing (ISBN: 978-981-3145-99-3) which touts having dissolved the remaining barriers to implementing Bulk Universal Quantum Computing (UQC), and as such most likely describes the most advanced QC development platform. Numerous books, hundreds of patents, thousands of papers and a Googolplex of considerations fill the pantheon of QC R&D. Of late QC mathemagicians claim QCs already exist; but by what chimeric definition. Does flipping a few qubits in a logic gate without an algorithm qualify as quantum computing? In physics, theory bears little weight without rigorous experimental confirmation, less if new, radical or a paradigm shift. This volume develops quantum computing based on '3rd regime' physics of Unified Field Mechanics (UFM). What distinguishes this work from a myriad of other avenues to UQC under study? Virtually all R&D paths struggle with technology and decoherence. If the currently highly favored room-sized cryogenically cooled quantum Hall anyon bilayer graphene QCs ever become successful, they would be reminiscent of the city block-sized Eniac computer of 1946. In 2017 quantum Hall techniques experimentally discovered additional dimension, said to be inaccessible and were called ‘artificial’. This scenario will not last long; the floodgates will open momentarily. Then we will have actual QCs! The QC prototype proposed herein is room temperature and tabletop. It is dramatically different in that it is not confined to the limitations of quantum mechanics; since it is based on principles of UFM, the Uncertainty Principle and Decoherence no longer apply. Thus, this QC model could be implemented on any other quantum platform!
Category: Quantum Physics

[17] viXra:1803.0056 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 03:32:36

Yang–Mills Existence and Mass Gap Concerned by the Theory with Consolidation

Authors: Gaurav Biraris
Comments: 9 Pages.

The theory with consolidation (TWC) published recently offers newer paradigm for theoretical fundamental physics. It has derived the four interactions and quantum existence in geometric manner. Outcomes of TWC address many critical problems in fundamental physics. The problem of Yang-Mills existence and mass gap needs understanding of physical mechanisms in pure mathematical sense. Appreciating Yang-Mills existence in TWC perspective takes us to a step forward towards solution of the problem. Existence of the mass gap and that of QFT is discussed in the article.
Category: Quantum Physics

[16] viXra:1803.0052 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-05 02:35:08

A Close Look at the Foundation of Quantized Inertia

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In his recent work, physicist Mike McCulloch has derived what he has coined ``Quantized Inertia'' from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. He has published a series of papers indicating that quantized inertia can predict everything from galaxy rotations (without relying on the concept of dark matter) to the EM drive. Clearly, it is an interesting theory that deserves some attention until proven or disproven. We think McCulloch has some excellent insights, but it is important to understand the fundamental principles from which he has derived his theory. We will comment on the derivation in his work and suggest that it possibly could be interpreted from a different perspective. Recent developments in mathematical atomism appear to have revealed new concepts concerning the Planck mass, the Plank length, and their link to special relativity, gravity, and even the Heisenberg principle. We are wondering if Quantized Inertia is compatible with the atomist view of the world and, if so, how should McCulloch's theory be interpreted in that light?
Category: Quantum Physics

[15] viXra:1803.0048 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 12:17:26

Refutation of the Principle of Superposition of States © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 3 Pages. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

In the argument for the superposition principle, we find all equations are not tautologous. A recent advance used in mathematical logic is disallowing the Equivalent connective of the ℝ real domain when applied to the ℂ complex domain and replacing it with the Imply connective.
Category: Quantum Physics

[14] viXra:1803.0047 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 13:37:36

Nanophotonics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Nanophotonics Researchers have developed a three-dimensional dynamic model of an interaction between light and nanoparticles. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[13] viXra:1803.0045 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-05 03:05:46

Newton's Gravity from Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. An In-Depth Study of the McCulloch Derivation

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

Mike McCulloch has derived Newton's gravity from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in an innovative and interesting way. Upon deeper examination, we will claim that his work has additional important implications, when viewed from a different perspective. Based on recent developments in mathematical atomism, particularly those exploring the nature of Planck masses and their link to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, we uncover an insight on the quantum world that leads to an even more profound interpretation of the McCulloch derivation than was put forward previously.
Category: Quantum Physics

[12] viXra:1803.0040 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 06:09:35

New Quantum Particle

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Scientists at Amherst College and Aalto University have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. [38] Using lasers, U.S. and Austrian physicists have coaxed ultracold strontium atoms into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. [37] A team of researchers has now presented this state of matter in the journal Physical Review Letters. The theoretical work was done at TU Wien (Vienna) and Harvard University, the experiment was performed at Rice University in Houston (Texas). [36] The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do—but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[11] viXra:1803.0039 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 08:23:41

Frequency-Comb Spectroscopy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

In a new paper published today in Science Advances, researchers under the direction of Columbia Engineering Professors Michal Lipson and Alexander Gaeta (Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics) have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized chip. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[10] viXra:1803.0038 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-07 06:22:57

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Collapse at the Planck Scale? Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle Becomes the Certainty Principle

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In this paper we show that Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, combined with key principles from Max Planck and Einstein, indicates that uncertainty collapses at the Planck scale. In essence we suggest that the uncertainty principle becomes the certainty principle at the Planck scale. This can be used to find the rest-mass formula for elementary particles consistent with what is already known. If this interpretation is correct, it means that Einstein’s intuition that “God Does Not Throw Dice with the Universe” could also be correct. We interpret this to mean that Einstein did not believe the world was ruled by strange uncertainty phenomena at the deeper level, and we will claim that this level is the Planck scale, where all uncertainty seems to collapse. The bad news is that this new-found certainty can only can last for one Planck second! We are also questioning, without coming to a conclusion, if this could have implications for Bell’s theorem and hidden variable theories.
Category: Quantum Physics

[9] viXra:1803.0036 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-23 04:09:01

Atomic Nuclei Modelled Without Exotic Particles and Magic Forces

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 13 Pages. Version 3 is an extension of the model presented in version 2 and shows interesting similarities with publicly presented potential energy density values of uranium and hydrogen

Atomic nuclei are normally drawn as a combination of protons and neutrons grouped together as close as possible. Given the enormous repulsive force between two protons such a configuration cannot represent reality. Quantum physics pretends to solve this problem by means of quarks, held together by gluons. This article presents a model without such particles and forces.
Category: Quantum Physics

[8] viXra:1803.0035 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-30 04:51:32

Why Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s Atomic Model is Invalid

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 5 Pages. Version 2 contains editorial changes in version 1

Outstanding surprisingly the misconception regarding the phenomenon potential energy most likely caused the change from Rutherford-Bohr’s to Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s atomic model.
Category: Quantum Physics

[7] viXra:1803.0034 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-18 08:30:52

Meth8/VŁ4 on Complex Numbers (ℂ) Copyright © 2008, 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. Note that comments on Disqus are not forwarded or read, so respond to author's email address: info@cec-services dot com.

Imaginary numbers in Meth8/ VŁ4 are rendered as implications and not equivalences, which serves to reason since complex numbers are imaginary and literally not real. Hence the complex number space (ℂ) is arguably a probabilistic vector space and never exact. Quantum field theory as based on ℂ is probabilistic, not bivalent, and hence suspicious.
Category: Quantum Physics

[6] viXra:1803.0032 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 09:17:58

Quantum Dot Photoemission

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17] Physicists from Trinity College Dublin's School of Physics and the CRANN Institute, Trinity College, have discovered a new form of light, which will impact our understanding of the fundamental nature of light. [16] Light from an optical fiber illuminates the metasurface, is scattered in four different directions, and the intensities are measured by the four detectors.
Category: Quantum Physics

[5] viXra:1803.0031 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 10:07:55

Store Time in a Quantum Superposition

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

Computer models of systems such as a city's traffic flow or neural firing in the brain tends to use up a lot of memory. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[4] viXra:1803.0029 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 06:17:58

Three-Qubit System

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[3] viXra:1803.0028 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 06:34:58

Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the killer applications of quantum computers. [39] A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2] viXra:1803.0013 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 11:51:03

Speed Record for Trapped-Ion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Researchers at Oxford University have set a new speed record for the 'logic gates' that form the building blocks of quantum computing-a technology that could transform the way we process information. [40] Simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the killer applications of quantum computers. [39] A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[1] viXra:1803.0011 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 14:03:14

Refutation of Poincaré Recurrence Theorem © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 2 Pages. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

We refute the equation μ⁢(E-An)≤μ⁢(Ao-An)=μ⁢(Ao)-μ⁢(An)=0. Through modification by replacing the Equivalent to connective with the Imply connective, the equation may be coerced into something other than the original. We then ask how experimental quantum results can be reconciled with the refuted Poincaré recurrence theorem. We reply that assuming the so-far non-replicated physical experiment cannot be falsified (such as by probabilistic objections), then those experimental quantum results are obviously misinterpreted into a mistaken conclusion.
Category: Quantum Physics