Physics of Biology

1910 Submissions

[59] viXra:1910.0626 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-30 08:46:52

Noncontainers Drug Delivery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

Nanocapsules and other containers can transport drugs through a patient's body directly to the origin of the disease and release them there in a controlled manner. [43] Coupier has found that deflating and inflating microscopic shells can induce directed motion, which could, for example, be used to help target drug delivery to a tumour. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[58] viXra:1910.0622 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-30 10:17:51

Advanced Microscopy DNA Structure

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

An advanced imaging technique reveals new structural details of S-DNA, ladder-like DNA that forms when the molecule experiences extreme tension. [22] Histones are proteins that regulate the unwinding of DNA in the cell nucleus and the expression of genes based on chemical modifications or "marks" that are placed on their tails. [21] Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[57] viXra:1910.0605 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-29 05:07:07

Microswimmers Single Particles and Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

The ability to precisely transport and position individual cells and microscopic particles in fluids could provide a powerful tool for a wide range of biomedical applications, including targeted drug delivery, nanomedicine and tissue engineering. [31] Developing an efficient delivery system for enhanced and controlled gene interference-based therapeutics is an existing challenge in molecular biology. [30] This fact makes lensless microscopy an ideal tool for medical diagnosis in remote areas since there is no need for the medical doctor to bring and maintain large, heavy and sensitive analysis devices. [29] The Columbia team behind the revolutionary 3-D SCAPE microscope announces today a new version of this high-speed imaging technology. [28] The discovery that protein therapeutics can hijack the HOPS complex to gain access to the cell interior should help scientists design therapeutic proteins to treat diseases that are not adequately treated using other approaches, Schepartz said. [27] DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. [26] For the English scientists involved, perhaps the most important fact is that their DNA read was about twice as long as the previous record, held by their Australian rivals. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important HYPERLINK "https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0734-6" study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[56] viXra:1910.0600 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-29 08:15:41

Light Control Biological Processes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

The biological technique of 'optogenetics' uses light to control cells within living tissues that have been genetically modified to be light-sensitive. [35] Not much is known about the course of events leading to Alzheimer’s disease, but the formation of toxic β-amyloid plaques and phosphorylated tau proteins have long been described as major hallmarks of the disease. [34] Neurobiologists Cátia Frias and Corette Wierenga have studied the formation of inhibitory synapses, a complex process that occurs when the brain adapts. Their research uncovered an astonishing link to autism. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[55] viXra:1910.0590 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-28 04:49:59

Mysterious Microproteins

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes, including those involved with cancer. [34] These will then produce the proteins themselves, without the cell functions being disturbed: cells, structures or their activities thus become visible under the microscope. [33] Measuring optical blood flow in the resting human brain to detect spontaneous activity has for the first time been demonstrated by Wright State University imaging researchers, holding out promise for a better way to study people with autism, Alzheimer's and depression. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[54] viXra:1910.0589 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-28 05:07:32

Rhomboid Protease in Action

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. [35] As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes, including those involved with cancer. [34] These will then produce the proteins themselves, without the cell functions being disturbed: cells, structures or their activities thus become visible under the microscope. [33] Measuring optical blood flow in the resting human brain to detect spontaneous activity has for the first time been demonstrated by Wright State University imaging researchers, holding out promise for a better way to study people with autism, Alzheimer's and depression. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[53] viXra:1910.0583 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-28 07:21:47

Electrospun Medical Innovations

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

When you visit Andrew Steckl's lab at the University of Cincinnati, you see a nondescript glass box that weaves together different fibers. [24] This scientific-technological advance will make it possible to provide a cheap, ultra-resistant material for the design of planes, cars and other means of transport. In addition, B6C is also ultra-resistant to radioactivity. [23] Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time frames of just one quadrillionth of a second-or a femtosecond. [22] DNA forensics is a powerful tool, yet it presents a computational scaling problem when it is improved and expanded for complex samples (those containing DNA from more than one individual) and kinship analysis. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15]
Category: Physics of Biology

[52] viXra:1910.0574 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-28 10:25:19

Lensless Medical Microscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

This fact makes lensless microscopy an ideal tool for medical diagnosis in remote areas since there is no need for the medical doctor to bring and maintain large, heavy and sensitive analysis devices. [29] The Columbia team behind the revolutionary 3-D SCAPE microscope announces today a new version of this high-speed imaging technology. [28] The discovery that protein therapeutics can hijack the HOPS complex to gain access to the cell interior should help scientists design therapeutic proteins to treat diseases that are not adequately treated using other approaches, Schepartz said. [27] DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. [26] For the English scientists involved, perhaps the most important fact is that their DNA read was about twice as long as the previous record, held by their Australian rivals. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important HYPERLINK "https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0734-6" study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/walker/" walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[51] viXra:1910.0573 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-28 10:55:46

Gene Silencing and Transformation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Developing an efficient delivery system for enhanced and controlled gene interference-based therapeutics is an existing challenge in molecular biology. [30] This fact makes lensless microscopy an ideal tool for medical diagnosis in remote areas since there is no need for the medical doctor to bring and maintain large, heavy and sensitive analysis devices. [29] The Columbia team behind the revolutionary 3-D SCAPE microscope announces today a new version of this high-speed imaging technology. [28] The discovery that protein therapeutics can hijack the HOPS complex to gain access to the cell interior should help scientists design therapeutic proteins to treat diseases that are not adequately treated using other approaches, Schepartz said. [27] DNA regions susceptible to breakage and loss are genetic hot spots for important evolutionary changes, according to a Stanford study. [26] For the English scientists involved, perhaps the most important fact is that their DNA read was about twice as long as the previous record, held by their Australian rivals. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important HYPERLINK "https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0734-6" study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/walker/" walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[50] viXra:1910.0545 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-26 04:00:41

Nanoparticles Act as Artificial Enzymes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

So-called nanoenzymes are hot candidates for treatments called catalytic immunotherapy. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41] One day, hospital patients might be able to ingest tiny robots that deliver drugs directly to diseased tissue, thanks to research being carried out at EPFL and ETH Zurich. [40] A team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel has now made such cascades in the lab by encapsulating three enzymes and enzyme cofactors in nanoreactors made from metal-organic framework nanoparticles. [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[49] viXra:1910.0544 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-26 04:21:42

Nanosheets Hydrogen Carrier

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, and colleagues in Japan have reported a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets. [43] So-called nanoenzymes are hot candidates for treatments called catalytic immunotherapy. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[48] viXra:1910.0543 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-26 04:54:20

Nanoparticles Zebrafish Hyperactive

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

Nanoplastics influence the behaviour of larval zebrafish, says new research by the Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL) and the Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML). [44] Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, and colleagues in Japan have reported a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets. [43] So-called nanoenzymes are hot candidates for treatments called catalytic immunotherapy. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[47] viXra:1910.0537 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-26 07:45:08

Beach Balls and Drug Delivery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Coupier has found that deflating and inflating microscopic shells can induce directed motion, which could, for example, be used to help target drug delivery to a tumour. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41] One day, hospital patients might be able to ingest tiny robots that deliver drugs directly to diseased tissue, thanks to research being carried out at EPFL and ETH Zurich. [40] A team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel has now made such cascades in the lab by encapsulating three enzymes and enzyme cofactors in nanoreactors made from metal-organic framework nanoparticles. [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[46] viXra:1910.0492 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-24 05:33:35

Bio-Inspired Nano-Catalyst

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

It could lead to more efficient production of some medicines. [39] A precise and non-toxic treatment that targets lung cancer cells at the nanoscale is able to effectively kill the cells even at a low dose. [38] The new treatment employs the alpha particle emitting radionuclide 225Ac. Alpha particles travel a short distance in tissue, thereby limiting their off-target effect. [37] Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used to target small lesions and a growing demand exists for miniaturized medical tools. [36] Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[45] viXra:1910.0487 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-24 08:21:27

Protein Permit Powerhouse of Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

A team of investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) has recently characterized a novel player in these pathways, a protein that they have dubbed P17/PERMIT. [43] Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study the structure of a protein "strain absorber" as it changes during muscle contractions. [42] Using pulsed infrared light lasers, scientists have activated molecules located inside neural tissue with an efficiency of almost 100 percent. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[44] viXra:1910.0463 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-23 03:11:33

Implantable Blood Vessels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3-D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein. [28] Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. [27] A team of researchers in China has used a form of the CRISPR gene editing technique to repair a genetic defect in a viable human embryo. [26] An international team of researchers has determined the function of a new family of proteins associated with cancer and autism. [25] In 2016, when we inaugurated our new IBM Research lab in Johannesburg, we took on this challenge and are reporting our first promising results at Health Day at the KDD Data Science Conference in London this month. [24] The research group took advantage of a system at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that combines machine learning-a form of artificial intelligence where computer algorithms glean knowledge from enormous amounts of data-with experiments that quickly make and screen hundreds of sample materials at a time. [23] Researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. [22] Such are the big questions behind one of the new projects underway at the MIT-IBM Watson AI Laboratory, a collaboration for research on the frontiers of artificial intelligence. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[43] viXra:1910.0462 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-23 03:23:19

Targeted Cancer Treatment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

A precise and non-toxic treatment that targets lung cancer cells at the nanoscale is able to effectively kill the cells even at a low dose. [38] The new treatment employs the alpha particle emitting radionuclide 225Ac. Alpha particles travel a short distance in tissue, thereby limiting their off-target effect. [37] Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used to target small lesions and a growing demand exists for miniaturized medical tools. [36] Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[42] viXra:1910.0440 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-22 13:55:40

Origin of Creation

Authors: Bhaskar
Comments: 48 Pages. No

No
Category: Physics of Biology

[41] viXra:1910.0426 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-22 04:24:16

Cell Stiffness Indicate Tumors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic. [38] The new treatment employs the alpha particle emitting radionuclide 225Ac. Alpha particles travel a short distance in tissue, thereby limiting their off-target effect. [37] Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used to target small lesions and a growing demand exists for miniaturized medical tools. [36] Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[40] viXra:1910.0421 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-22 07:09:26

Optical Imaging Quality Assurance

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Optical scintillation imaging is proving feasible as a quality assurance (QA) tool for small static beams and for pre-treatment verification of radiosurgery and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. [32] Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity. [31] Large-scale plasmonic metasurfaces could find use in flat panel displays and other devices that can change colour thanks to recent work by researchers at the University of Cambridge in the UK. [30] Particles in solution can grow, transport, collide, interact, and aggregate into complex shapes and structures. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[39] viXra:1910.0384 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-20 20:33:26

Gaia Hypothesis vs. Stellar Metamorphosis

Authors: Jeffrey Joseph Wolynski
Comments: 1 Page.

The Gaia Hypothesis proposes that life creates its own habitable environment. This hypothesis is not needed. It is the environment that creates the life. The stars evolve on huge time and chemical scales to create life itself. Life is a by-product, a direct, intimate result of stellar evolution (planet formation), it does not drive the evolution of stars.
Category: Physics of Biology

[38] viXra:1910.0380 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-20 04:11:42

Evolution in Understanding of Evolution

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

Reconstructing evolutionary branches is tricky, especially when many species share a similar type of protein that might have evolved to perform somewhat different functions. [33] Researchers from the The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[37] viXra:1910.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-20 04:39:28

Evolution Tells We Are Only Intelligent Life

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Are we alone in the universe? It comes down to whether intelligence is a probable outcome of natural selection, or an improbable fluke. [34] Reconstructing evolutionary branches is tricky, especially when many species share a similar type of protein that might have evolved to perform somewhat different functions. [33] Researchers from the The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[36] viXra:1910.0378 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-20 05:00:09

Reconstructing Protein Evolution

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

There are an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 proteins at work in cells, where they carry out numerable functions, says computational molecular biologist Roman Sloutsky at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. [35] Are we alone in the universe? It comes down to whether intelligence is a probable outcome of natural selection, or an improbable fluke. [34] Reconstructing evolutionary branches is tricky, especially when many species share a similar type of protein that might have evolved to perform somewhat different functions. [33] Researchers from the The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[35] viXra:1910.0371 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-20 08:55:02

Building Blocks of Many Drugs

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Organic chemists at The Ohio State University have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs-including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer-are produced. [38] Determining the optimal binding energies for heterogeneous chemical reactions-usually meaning that the reactant is in the gas or liquid phase while the catalyst is a solid-is critical for many aspects of modern society, as we rely on such reactions for processes as diverse as the production of fertilizers and plastics. [37] Among the many techniques being investigated to generate clean energy, water splitting is a very promising one. [36] But now, Shigehisa Akine and colleagues from Kanazawa University have shown that the reversed order is also possible: first, the host undergoes a chemical reaction, after which it recognizes and forms a complex with the guest ion. [35] In batteries, fuel cells or technical coatings, central chemical processes take place on the surface of electrodes which are in contact with liquids. During these processes, atoms move over the surface, but how this exactly happens has hardly been researched. [34] A team of scientists from across the U.S. has found a new way to create molecular interconnections that can give a certain class of materials exciting new properties, including improving their ability to catalyze chemical reactions or harvest energy from light. [33] A team of scientists including Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules, H2, trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it. [32] A potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[34] viXra:1910.0352 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-19 05:36:59

Approach to Tackle Superbugs

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients. [33] A chance finding 10 years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. [32] Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. [31]
Category: Physics of Biology

[33] viXra:1910.0351 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-19 07:12:14

Mathematical Modelling Disease Outbreaks

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. [34] Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients. [33] A chance finding 10 years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. [32] Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. [31]
Category: Physics of Biology

[32] viXra:1910.0350 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-19 07:29:54

First Genome from a Single Insect

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35] Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. [34] Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[31] viXra:1910.0348 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-19 08:47:55

Floating Magnetic Microrobots

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used to target small lesions and a growing demand exists for miniaturized medical tools. [36] Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35] Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. [34] Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[30] viXra:1910.0347 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-19 10:05:11

Radiation to Pancreatic Tumors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

The new treatment employs the alpha particle emitting radionuclide 225Ac. Alpha particles travel a short distance in tissue, thereby limiting their off-target effect. [37] Minimally invasive surgery is increasingly used to target small lesions and a growing demand exists for miniaturized medical tools. [36] Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[29] viXra:1910.0332 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-18 05:30:46

Organic Solar Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan report that organic solar cells (OSCs) with high mobility and highly crystalline donor (D) and acceptor (A) materials were able to reduce an open-circuit voltage (VOC) loss. [37] Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a simple new tweak that could double the efficiency of organic electronics. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26]
Category: Physics of Biology

[28] viXra:1910.0323 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-18 08:40:14

Respiratory Disease High Blood Pressure

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. [27] A team of researchers in China has used a form of the CRISPR gene editing technique to repair a genetic defect in a viable human embryo. [26] An international team of researchers has determined the function of a new family of proteins associated with cancer and autism. [25] In 2016, when we inaugurated our new IBM Research lab in Johannesburg, we took on this challenge and are reporting our first promising results at Health Day at the KDD Data Science Conference in London this month. [24] The research group took advantage of a system at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that combines machine learning-a form of artificial intelligence where computer algorithms glean knowledge from enormous amounts of data-with experiments that quickly make and screen hundreds of sample materials at a time. [23] Researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. [22] Such are the big questions behind one of the new projects underway at the MIT-IBM Watson AI Laboratory, a collaboration for research on the frontiers of artificial intelligence. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[27] viXra:1910.0314 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-17 03:23:00

Nanomesh Drug Delivery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[26] viXra:1910.0302 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-17 07:20:00

Bio-Circuitry Neurons Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. [31] The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[25] viXra:1910.0298 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-17 07:47:59

Mice Born with Hyper-Long Telomeres

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

A chance finding 10 years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. [32] Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. [31] The fight against global antibiotic resistance has taken a major step forward with scientists discovering a concept for fabricating nanomeshes as an effective drug delivery system for antibiotics. [30] The solution consisting of colloidal quantum dots is inkjet-printed, creating active photosensitive layer of the photodetector. [29] I'm part of a group of nanotechnology and neuroscience researchers at the University of Washington investigating how quantum dots behave in the brain. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[24] viXra:1910.0253 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-15 04:53:14

Tackle Radioresistant Melanoma

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses synchrotron X-ray beams to deliver spatially fractionated radiation, with extremely high peak doses deposited in the microbeam path and tissue located between the microbeams receiving only a small fraction of this dose. [38] The new technology can successfully measure heart rate and oxygen saturation. It also has the potential to measure blood pressure and cardiac output, whilst maintaining its flexible and transparent form. [37] Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a fully print-in-place technique for electronics that is gentle enough to work on delicate surfaces including paper and human skin. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[23] viXra:1910.0252 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-15 05:11:37

Alphabet of Origami

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 76 Pages.

This discovery could help in the construction of origami robots and toward designing smart programmable materials. [51] A team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Vanderbilt University and the University of Maryland has created origami-like structures made out of graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group explains how they achieved this feat and possible applications. [50] Platinum has long been used as a catalyst to enable the oxidation reduction reaction at the center of fuel cell technology. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[22] viXra:1910.0226 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-14 08:48:59

Protein-Folded DNA Nanostructures

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

By using proteins that naturally bind and arrange DNA inside cells, a KAUST-led team has devised a plug-and-play strategy for building stable, custom-designed nanostructures. [25] Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape. [24] One way we might actually prove our biological complexity is to look at the number of different proteins that our bodies can produce for building all our different types of cells and the other things they need. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[21] viXra:1910.0215 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-13 03:56:58

Iron in Soils Immobilize Arsenic

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have discovered the mechanism to "switch on" iron residing in clay mineral structures, leading to the understanding of how to make iron reactive under oxygen-free conditions. [31] One such process has now been elucidated by a team led by Prof. Matthias Kling and Dr. Boris Bergues at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP), which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (LMU) and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ). [30] Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a non-invasive hybrid imaging technique that excites biological tissues with light and detects the subsequently generated ultrasound to form images. [29]
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1910.0206 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-13 07:36:28

Transparent Graphene Wearables Monitor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

The new technology can successfully measure heart rate and oxygen saturation. It also has the potential to measure blood pressure and cardiac output, whilst maintaining its flexible and transparent form. [37] Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a fully print-in-place technique for electronics that is gentle enough to work on delicate surfaces including paper and human skin. [36] Called the Quantum Material Press, or QPress, this system will accelerate the discovery of next-generation materials for the emerging field of quantum information science (QIS). [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1910.0190 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-12 04:10:53

DNA Fighting Back Virus

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

A virus that infects koalas is steadily integrating itself into their DNA, ensuring that it is passed down from generation to generation. But the koala genome is defending itself, revealing that DNA has its own immune system to shut down invaders. [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12]
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1910.0187 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-12 06:00:20

Chiral Asymmetry of D. Hofstadter’s Typogenetics

Authors: Perry W Swanborough
Comments: 12 Pages.

Typographical genetics (“Typogenetics”) introduced by Douglas Hofstadter in 1979 is an abstract recursive logic system which has been studied subsequently for insights into self-reproduction. There are immediately-observable asymmetries in the early formulations of Typogenetics, but after design of a triplet-codon Typogenetics to eliminate these, fundamental irreducible asymmetry remains. It is noted that both Typogenetics and self-reproduction of cellular automaton loop structures share the property of chiral asymmetry.
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1910.0186 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-12 06:06:35

Opencell: a Hypothetical Cure for a Genetic Disease, or Cancer, Using a Simulation Like Openworm

Authors: Domenico Oricchio
Comments: 1 Page.

A simulation of a cure on a complete mathematical model of a human cell may be possible, to accelerate pharmacological research
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1910.0178 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-11 03:14:15

Biomimetic Energy Transport

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Würzburg (Germany) have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform. [42] Gallium nitride, a semiconductor that revolutionized energy-efficient LED lighting, could also transform electronics and wireless communication, thanks to a discovery made by Cornell researchers. [41] The signals from a lighthouse to ships at sea is an early example of optical communication, the use of light to transmit information. [40]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1910.0175 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-11 04:51:41

Nanostructures Reduce Adhesion of Bacteria

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Now a team of researchers has discovered that precise analysis of the topographical composition of nanostructured surfaces provides a direct means of deriving the adhesive forces that bind bacteria to a surface. [38] The group of NanoBiotechnology at IMDEA Nanociencia, led by Prof. Álvaro Somoza, has used gold nanoclusters coated with albumin to facilitate the attachment of two active molecules for the treatment of breast cancer. [37] Microtubules are protein polymers that assemble into dynamic structures, essential for cell division, shape, motility, and transport of intracellular cargos. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1910.0160 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-10 04:24:56

Nanoparticles Impact on Environment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

This discovery at the chemistry-biology interface is a first step toward developing new sustainable materials and practices, as well as providing the groundwork for possible remediation approaches." [38] Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications. [37] Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface. [36] A fiber optic sensing system developed by researchers in China and Canada can peer inside supercapacitors and batteries to observe their state of charge. [35] The idea of using a sound wave in optical fibers initially came from the team's partner researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Joint research projects should follow. [34] Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have constructed a first-of-its-kind optic isolator based on resonance of light waves on a rapidly rotating glass sphere. [33] The micro-resonator is a two-mirror trap for the light, with the mirrors facing each other within several hundred nanometers. [32] "The realization of such all-optical single-photon devices will be a large step towards deterministic multi-mode entanglement generation as well as high-fidelity photonic quantum gates that are crucial for all-optical quantum information processing," says Tanji-Suzuki. [31] Researchers at ETH have now used attosecond laser pulses to measure the time evolution of this effect in molecules. [30] A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. [29]
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1910.0136 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-09 10:18:20

DNA-PAINT Microscopy at Speed

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow researchers to study biological processes below the classical diffraction limit of light. [20] Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are now able to see greater details of DNA origami nanostructures, which will lead to a greater understanding and control of their assembly for future applications. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1910.0111 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-08 08:12:24

Precancerous Detection with Nanodiamonds

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

Scientists at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (MEPhI) have studied the optical properties of detonation nanodiamonds when interacting with various biomacromolecules (biopolymer molecules). [24] The Pt nanoreactor was designed with a controlled core-shell structure and morphology for the visual detection of metabolic biomarkers and direct laser desorption/ionization MS fingerprinting of the native serum. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1910.0069 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-06 06:24:20

Printed Electronics for Biosensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a fully print-in-place technique for electronics that is gentle enough to work on delicate surfaces including paper and human skin. [36] Called the Quantum Material Press, or QPress, this system will accelerate the discovery of next-generation materials for the emerging field of quantum information science (QIS). [35] A novel technique that nudges single atoms to switch places within an atomically thin material could bring scientists another step closer to realizing theoretical physicist Richard Feynman's vision of building tiny machines from the atom up. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1910.0067 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-06 06:47:35

View Inside a Living Mouse's Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

The researchers said their technique could also enable surgeons to more precisely excise tumors and aid biologists and medical researchers in studying fundamental processes within cells. [37] Electrical engineers at Duke University have devised a fully print-in-place technique for electronics that is gentle enough to work on delicate surfaces including paper and human skin. [36] Called the Quantum Material Press, or QPress, this system will accelerate the discovery of next-generation materials for the emerging field of quantum information science (QIS). [35] A novel technique that nudges single atoms to switch places within an atomically thin material could bring scientists another step closer to realizing theoretical physicist Richard Feynman's vision of building tiny machines from the atom up. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1910.0059 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:11:35

CRISPR Alter the Microbiome

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria. [26] The work reflects a growing trend at both the Salk Institute and elsewhere toward integrating computational approaches into biology research. [25] That's only a smattering of what scientists will be able to examine with the new microscope—an atomic force-Raman microscope, to be exact—now housed in the University of Delaware's Lammot du Pont Laboratory. [24] The Pt nanoreactor was designed with a controlled core-shell structure and morphology for the visual detection of metabolic biomarkers and direct laser desorption/ionization MS fingerprinting of the native serum. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1910.0058 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:13:37

Protein Networks Behind Tumor Growth

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have used highly sophisticated molecular analyses to identify key proteins in the signaling pathways that cancers use to spread in the body. The study could help in personalizing cancer treatment and developing new drugs. [20] To fully understand how genome integrity is maintained, David Cortez, Ph.D., and colleagues have generated a "catalog" of the proteins present at sites of DNA duplication (replication forks) and chromatin packaging of newly synthesized DNA. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1910.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:15:32

Cutting-Edge Microscopy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

The work reflects a growing trend at both the Salk Institute and elsewhere toward integrating computational approaches into biology research. [25] That's only a smattering of what scientists will be able to examine with the new microscope—an atomic force-Raman microscope, to be exact—now housed in the University of Delaware's Lammot du Pont Laboratory. [24] The Pt nanoreactor was designed with a controlled core-shell structure and morphology for the visual detection of metabolic biomarkers and direct laser desorption/ionization MS fingerprinting of the native serum. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1910.0056 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:17:46

NMR Approach for Cell Content

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Researchers in Utrecht have found a new way to observe membraneless compartments at an unprecedented level of resolution. [20] To fully understand how genome integrity is maintained, David Cortez, Ph.D., and colleagues have generated a "catalog" of the proteins present at sites of DNA duplication (replication forks) and chromatin packaging of newly synthesized DNA. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1910.0055 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:19:33

DNA Replication Catalog

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

To fully understand how genome integrity is maintained, David Cortez, Ph.D., and colleagues have generated a "catalog" of the proteins present at sites of DNA duplication (replication forks) and chromatin packaging of newly synthesized DNA. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1910.0049 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:43:41

Microscope with Dual Capabilities

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

That's only a smattering of what scientists will be able to examine with the new microscope—an atomic force-Raman microscope, to be exact—now housed in the University of Delaware's Lammot du Pont Laboratory. [24] The Pt nanoreactor was designed with a controlled core-shell structure and morphology for the visual detection of metabolic biomarkers and direct laser desorption/ionization MS fingerprinting of the native serum. [23] Nuclear technology companies Phoenix and SHINE Medical Technologies have achieved a new world record for a nuclear fusion reaction in a steady-state system, the strongest of its kind ever produced on Earth. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1910.0048 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:45:42

Cancer Diagnosis with Platinum Nanoreactor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

The Pt nanoreactor was designed with a controlled core-shell structure and morphology for the visual detection of metabolic biomarkers and direct laser desorption/ionization MS fingerprinting of the native serum. [23] Nuclear technology companies Phoenix and SHINE Medical Technologies have achieved a new world record for a nuclear fusion reaction in a steady-state system, the strongest of its kind ever produced on Earth. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1910.0047 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 05:47:54

Medical Isotope Production

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

Nuclear technology companies Phoenix and SHINE Medical Technologies have achieved a new world record for a nuclear fusion reaction in a steady-state system, the strongest of its kind ever produced on Earth. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21] Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1910.0040 [pdf] submitted on 2019-10-05 06:02:37

Quantizing DNA Metamolecules

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Tailored metal nanoclusters can be actively developed in the lab to manipulate light at the subwavelength scale for nanophotonic applications. [21] Researchers at the University of Wollongong's (UOW) Molecular Horizons initiative have shed new light on how an important but not well understood protein goes about its vital role of reducing errors and mutations in DNA replication. [20] DNA is a lengthy molecule—approximately 1,000-fold longer than the cell in which it resides—so it can't be jammed in haphazardly. [19]
Category: Physics of Biology