Physics of Biology

1908 Submissions

[52] viXra:1908.0610 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-29 08:34:34

Nanoparticles Click Immune Cells into Tumors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

IBS scientists have reported a novel targeting strategy that allows deep tumor penetration of drug-loaded nanoparticles. [15] In the journal PNAS this week, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital and MIT show that these mini-antibodies, shrunk further to create so-called nanobodies, may help solve a problem in the cancer field: making CAR T-cell therapies work in solid tumors. [14] What if the brain could detect its own disease? Researchers have been trying to create a material that "thinks" like the brain does, which would be more sensitive to early signs of neurological diseases such as Parkinson's. [13] University Professor of Applied Physics Stephen Arnold and his team at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering have made a discovery that could lead to Star Trek-like biosensor devices capable of flagging the barest presence in blood of a specific virus or antibody, or protein marker for a specific cancer; or sniffing out airborne chemical warfare agents while they are still far below toxic levels. [12] Lead researcher Dr Jonathan Breeze, from Imperial's Department of Materials, said: "This breakthrough paves the way for the widespread adoption of masers and opens the door for a wide array of applications that we are keen to explore. We hope the maser will now enjoy as much success as the laser." [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Physics of Biology

[51] viXra:1908.0605 [pdf] replaced on 2019-08-30 12:12:02

Emergence of Life from Highly Excited Strings Beyond Darwin’s Theory

Authors: Massimo Fioranelli; Alireza Sepehri; Maria Grazia Roccia
Comments: 14 Pages.

We propose a new version of Darwin’s theory that connects evolutions of biological system to evolutions of cosmological systems. In this theory, the origin of both systems are closed strings which could shrink to stable zero-dimensional manifolds topologically. Then, these strings join to each other and form highly excited string balls which could shrink to non-stable zero-dimensional manifold. This system decays into open strings which each of them couple to a one-dimensional manifold and by joining all manifolds, an N-dimensional manifold is emerged. Then, this manifold decays to a 4-dimensional universe and a N-4-dimensional manifold which wind around this universe. Next, some closed strings decay into two groups of open strings which one group produces hexagonal and pentagonal manifolds in universe and another creates the same manifolds with opposite quantum charges in extra dimensions. Summing over charges of two groups of open strings should be equal to the charge of closed strings. By joining these manifolds, two types of biological objects are emerged which one is known as DNA in our universe and another is called dark DNA (anti-DNA) in extra dimensions. Quantum charges of atoms, bases and elements of dark DNAs in extra dimensions have opposite signs respect to quantum charges of atoms, bases and elements of DNAs in universe. On the other hand, some other closed strings decay into two groups of open strings and these strings produce two types of DNAs with opposite quantum charges which one type create the life on the planets and another produces a black stringy DNA with high temperature interior the core of planet. Thus, life on the earth can be controlled by the evolutions of strings in extra dimensions and strings interior of the earth’s core.
Category: Physics of Biology

[50] viXra:1908.0582 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-28 08:58:31

Seeing and Believing in Imaging

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

As researchers continue to push the limits of imaging, a scientist at Washington University in St. Louis has uncovered a fundamental barrier to accuracy when it comes to measuring the rotational motion of molecules. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45]
Category: Physics of Biology

[49] viXra:1908.0560 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-27 10:50:51

Nanoparticles Give Human Night Vision

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44]
Category: Physics of Biology

[48] viXra:1908.0559 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-27 11:18:46

Cell's Antenna Drive Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

The hope is that further research into cilia will help untangle the complex relationship between them and cancer, and provide both new insights into some of the drivers of cancer as well as new targets for cancer treatment. [49] Researchers have found that changing the mechanical properties of individual cells disrupts their ability to remain stable, profoundly affecting their health and the health of the tissue that comprises them. [48] Biochemists at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. [47]
Category: Physics of Biology

[47] viXra:1908.0558 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-27 11:32:02

Fat Pumps Electrical Power

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ("flips") lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. [50] The hope is that further research into cilia will help untangle the complex relationship between them and cancer, and provide both new insights into some of the drivers of cancer as well as new targets for cancer treatment. [49] Researchers have found that changing the mechanical properties of individual cells disrupts their ability to remain stable, profoundly affecting their health and the health of the tissue that comprises them. [48]
Category: Physics of Biology

[46] viXra:1908.0551 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-28 04:51:49

Biological Risk of Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

A team of researchers from the Physics, Medicine and Chemistry departments at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now examined whether these particles are potentially dangerous for the organism and how cells cope with them once they have been incorporated. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46]
Category: Physics of Biology

[45] viXra:1908.0547 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-26 10:01:43

Sea Snail Reduces Cancer Risk

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[44] viXra:1908.0546 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-26 10:17:22

Elusive Protein Eliminating Tropical Diseases

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[43] viXra:1908.0529 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-27 03:26:29

Blue RNA Light Control

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

Biochemists at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45]
Category: Physics of Biology

[42] viXra:1908.0528 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-27 03:39:55

Cells Affect Tissue Structures Form

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

Researchers have found that changing the mechanical properties of individual cells disrupts their ability to remain stable, profoundly affecting their health and the health of the tissue that comprises them. [48] Biochemists at the University of Bayreuth and the University of Bonn have now discovered a way to regulate this process which is central to gene expression: Certain actinobacteria contain a protein that binds RNA molecules under blue light and can thereby deactivate them. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle—the nature of memory—fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46]
Category: Physics of Biology

[41] viXra:1908.0524 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 06:33:29

Nano-Thermometer Inside Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

That's now possible thanks to research by Rice University scientists who used the light-emitting properties of particular molecules to create a fluorescent nano-thermometer. [41] Collaborative research at ANSTO led by Mr Shinji Kihara and A/Prof. Duncan McGillivray of The MacDiarmid Institute, New Zealand with ANSTO's Dr. Jitendra Mata, scientists from the University of Auckland and A/Prof Ingo Köper from Flinders University, SA , is contributing to a better understanding of how nanoplastics interact with blood plasma proteins and other biological molecules within the body. [40] Our new structures show how this is achieved, providing a framework for the entire V-ATPase family". [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[40] viXra:1908.0523 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 07:05:08

Nanoparticle Toxicity Levels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Bioengineers and biophysicists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, the Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, the Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne in France, and the University of Tubingen in Germany have discovered that the toxicity of nanoparticles depends more on their size and the extent to which their surface area is charged than on their chemical composition. [42] That's now possible thanks to research by Rice University scientists who used the light-emitting properties of particular molecules to create a fluorescent nano-thermometer. [41] Collaborative research at ANSTO led by Mr Shinji Kihara and A/Prof. Duncan McGillivray of The MacDiarmid Institute, New Zealand with ANSTO's Dr. Jitendra Mata, scientists from the University of Auckland and A/Prof Ingo Köper from Flinders University, SA , is contributing to a better understanding of how nanoplastics interact with blood plasma proteins and other biological molecules within the body. [40] Our new structures show how this is achieved, providing a framework for the entire V-ATPase family". [39] Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. [38] Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[39] viXra:1908.0522 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 07:30:35

Gene Editing Cancer Therapy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43] Bioengineers and biophysicists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, the Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, the Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne in France, and the University of Tubingen in Germany have discovered that the toxicity of nanoparticles depends more on their size and the extent to which their surface area is charged than on their chemical composition. [42]
Category: Physics of Biology

[38] viXra:1908.0518 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 10:04:35

Deliver Drugs Pinpointing Targeting

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a system to deliver medical treatments that can be released at precise times, minimally-invasively, and that ultimately could also deliver those drugs to specifically targeted areas such as a specific group of neurons in the brain. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[37] viXra:1908.0515 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 10:28:40

Next-Generation Filtration and Desalination

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

Deriving drinkable water from seawater, treating wastewater and conducting kidney dialysis are just a few important processes that use a technology called membrane filtration. [45] Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a system to deliver medical treatments that can be released at precise times, minimally-invasively, and that ultimately could also deliver those drugs to specifically targeted areas such as a specific group of neurons in the brain. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[36] viXra:1908.0514 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-25 10:44:26

Artificial Chameleon Skin Nanomachines

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

Researchers have developed artificial 'chameleon skin' that changes color when exposed to light and could be used in applications such as active camouflage and large-scale dynamic displays. [46] Deriving drinkable water from seawater, treating wastewater and conducting kidney dialysis are just a few important processes that use a technology called membrane filtration. [45] Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a system to deliver medical treatments that can be released at precise times, minimally-invasively, and that ultimately could also deliver those drugs to specifically targeted areas such as a specific group of neurons in the brain. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[35] viXra:1908.0498 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-24 08:35:00

Structure of Protein Nanoturbine

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Our new structures show how this is achieved, providing a framework for the entire V-ATPase family". [39] Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. [38] Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31]
Category: Physics of Biology

[34] viXra:1908.0496 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-24 09:26:28

Nanoplastic and Blood Plasma Protein

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Collaborative research at ANSTO led by Mr Shinji Kihara and A/Prof. Duncan McGillivray of The MacDiarmid Institute, New Zealand with ANSTO's Dr. Jitendra Mata, scientists from the University of Auckland and A/Prof Ingo Köper from Flinders University, SA , is contributing to a better understanding of how nanoplastics interact with blood plasma proteins and other biological molecules within the body. [40] Our new structures show how this is achieved, providing a framework for the entire V-ATPase family". [39] Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. [38] Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[33] viXra:1908.0473 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-24 02:42:38

Slow Electrons Combat Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Ion beams are often used today in cancer treatment: this involves electrically charged atoms being fired at the tumour to destroy cancer cells. [38] Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[32] viXra:1908.0468 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-22 07:22:43

Artificial Eye and Muscle

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

Inspired by the human eye, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an adaptive metalens that is essentially a flat, electronically controlled artificial eye. [38] Wearable electronic human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are an emerging class of devices to facilitate human and machine interactions. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[31] viXra:1908.0407 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-20 01:15:36

Proteins Smart Interaction

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. [38] Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31] Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[30] viXra:1908.0398 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 08:15:15

Optofluidic Nanopore Smart Gate

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis. [26] The ability to observe how life works at a nanoscale level is a grand challenge of our time. [25] Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape. [24] One way we might actually prove our biological complexity is to look at the number of different proteins that our bodies can produce for building all our different types of cells and the other things they need. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21] Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. [20] A microscopic thread of DNA evidence in a public genealogy database led California authorities to declare this spring they had caught the Golden State Killer, the rapist and murderer who had eluded authorities for decades. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17]
Category: Physics of Biology

[29] viXra:1908.0397 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 08:34:36

Nano-Sized Cellular Process

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

Nanometers are one billionth of a meter, a metric typically used to measure molecules and scientific building blocks not visible to the human eye. [27] A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis. [26] The ability to observe how life works at a nanoscale level is a grand challenge of our time. [25] Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape. [24] One way we might actually prove our biological complexity is to look at the number of different proteins that our bodies can produce for building all our different types of cells and the other things they need. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22] Bacterial systems are some of the simplest and most effective platforms for the expression of recombinant proteins. [21] Now, in a new paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Mayo researchers have determined how one DNA repair protein gets to the site of DNA damage. [20] A microscopic thread of DNA evidence in a public genealogy database led California authorities to declare this spring they had caught the Golden State Killer, the rapist and murderer who had eluded authorities for decades. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[28] viXra:1908.0396 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 09:09:45

Carbon Dots Cancer Treatment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

A pioneering new technique that could make light-based cancer treatment more effective and safer for patients, while reducing its cost, has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield. [39] Scientists at Texas Heart Institute (THI) and Rice University have used biocompatible fibres made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electrical bridges to restore conductivity to damaged hearts. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects-by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36] Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. [35] For years, researchers have been trying to find ways to grow an optimal nanowire, using crystals with perfectly aligned layers all along the wire. [34] Ferroelectric materials have a spontaneous dipole moment which can point up or down. [33] Researchers have successfully demonstrated that hypothetical particles that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[27] viXra:1908.0394 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 10:03:41

Mimotope Variation Analysis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31] Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[26] viXra:1908.0384 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 01:32:50

Nano-Sized Factories for Biotech

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology—OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[25] viXra:1908.0380 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 03:00:37

Nanoscale Drug Delivery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[24] viXra:1908.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 03:20:57

Nanotechnology Stem Cell Transplantation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34]
Category: Physics of Biology

[23] viXra:1908.0378 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 03:43:28

Nanomembrane Wearable Human Interfaces

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Wearable electronic human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are an emerging class of devices to facilitate human and machine interactions. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35] The lab of Cheryl Kerfeld at Michigan State University has created a synthetic nano-sized factory, based on natural ones found in bacteria. [34] Among these different testing systems, there is the Mimotope Variation Analysis (MVA) developed and patented by the Estonian biotechnology company Protobios which has never been used in the framework of biomaterial assessment before. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31] Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29]
Category: Physics of Biology

[22] viXra:1908.0377 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 03:57:28

Nanocapsule Reaches Nervous Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. [37] Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries. [36] Tiny silica bottles filled with medicine and a special temperature-sensitive material could be used for drug delivery to kill malignant cells only in certain parts of the body, according to a study published recently by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[21] viXra:1908.0360 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 01:04:10

Tiny Lensless Endoscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Researchers have developed a new self-calibrating endoscope that produces 3-D images of objects smaller than a single cell. [32] Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode. [31] Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1908.0333 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 04:13:51

Nanoscale Biology Lab Equipment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

The ability to observe how life works at a nanoscale level is a grand challenge of our time. [25] Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape. [24] One way we might actually prove our biological complexity is to look at the number of different proteins that our bodies can produce for building all our different types of cells and the other things they need. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1908.0282 [pdf] replaced on 2019-10-10 23:47:55

Possible Traces of Resonance Signaling in the Genome

Authors: Ivan Savelyev, Max Myakishev-Rempel
Comments: 17 Pages.

Although theories regarding the role of sequence-specific DNA resonance in biology have abounded for over 40 years, the published evidence for it is lacking. Here, the authors reasoned that for sustained resonance signaling, the number of oscillating DNA sequences per genome should be exceptionally high and that, therefore, genomic repeats of various sizes are good candidates for serving as resonators. Moreover, it was suggested that for the two DNA sequences to resonate, they do not necessarily have to be identical. Therefore, the existence of sequences differing in the primary sequence but having similar resonating sub-structures was proposed. It was hypothesized that such sequences, named HIDERs, would be enriched in the genomes of multicellular species. Specifically, it was hypothesized that delocalized electron clouds of purine-pyrimidine sequences could serve as the basis of HIDERs. The consequent computational genomic analysis confirmed the enrichment of purine-pyrimidine HIDERs in a few selected genomes of mammals, an insect, and a plant, compared to randomized sequence controls. Similarly, it was suggested that hypothetical delocalized proton clouds of the hydrogen bonds of multiple stacked bases could serve as sequence-dependent hydrogen-bond-based HIDERs. Similarly, the enrichment of such HIDERs was observed. It is suggested that these enrichments are the first evidence in support of sequence-specific resonance signaling in the genome.
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1908.0277 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-14 01:48:04

Biological Clocks Locked in Sync

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Scientists from EPFL's Institute of Bioengineering have discovered that the circadian clock and the cell-cycle are, in fact, synchronized. [26] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular switch that causes immune cells called macrophages to clean up cellular debris caused by infections instead of contributing to inflammation and tissue injury. [25] Working with mouse and human tissue, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a protein pumped out of some—but not all—populations of "helper" cells in the brain, called astrocytes, plays a specific role in directing the formation of connections among neurons needed for learning and forming new memories. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1908.0276 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-14 02:13:15

Counterintuitive Physics in Living Organism

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

Ever since the late 19th century, physicists have known about a counterintuitive property of some electric circuits called negative resistance. [27] Scientists from EPFL's Institute of Bioengineering have discovered that the circadian clock and the cell-cycle are, in fact, synchronized. [26] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular switch that causes immune cells called macrophages to clean up cellular debris caused by infections instead of contributing to inflammation and tissue injury. [25] Working with mouse and human tissue, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a protein pumped out of some—but not all—populations of "helper" cells in the brain, called astrocytes, plays a specific role in directing the formation of connections among neurons needed for learning and forming new memories. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1908.0210 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-11 10:55:19

Anti-Inflammatory Immune System

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular switch that causes immune cells called macrophages to clean up cellular debris caused by infections instead of contributing to inflammation and tissue injury. [25] Working with mouse and human tissue, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a protein pumped out of some - but not all - populations of "helper" cells in the brain, called astrocytes, plays a specific role in directing the formation of connections among neurons needed for learning and forming new memories. [24] Researchers from Harvard University and the Broad Institute's Stanley Centre for Psychiatric Research have developed reproducible brain organoids for the first time. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1908.0209 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-11 10:29:04

Nanotechnology Repair Brain Circuits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Working with mouse and human tissue, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that a protein pumped out of some - but not all - populations of "helper" cells in the brain, called astrocytes, plays a specific role in directing the formation of connections among neurons needed for learning and forming new memories. [24] Researchers from Harvard University and the Broad Institute's Stanley Centre for Psychiatric Research have developed reproducible brain organoids for the first time. [23] Researchers at the University of Twente have designed a tiny needle in which micro-channels can be used for extracting small liquid samples from a local area of the brain. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1908.0205 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-11 08:38:13

Proteins Restore Sound-Detecting

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Using genetic tools in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a pair of proteins that precisely control when sound-detecting cells, known as hair cells, are born in the mammalian inner ear. [24] Certain molecules found in common chemotherapy drugs are known for being radiosensitisers, which means they increase the DNA damage and tumour cell killing rates of radiotherapy. [23] University of Arkansas physics researchers have developed a simple, cost-effective method to study the effects of chemicals on DNA which has potential to improve the development and testing of life-saving treatments. [22] Scientists at the University of Sheffield studying ancient DNA have created a tool allowing them to more accurately identify ancient Eurasian populations, which can be used to test an individual's similarity to ancient people who once roamed the earth. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15]
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1908.0199 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-10 09:35:08

Chemotherapy Drugs in Water

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Certain molecules found in common chemotherapy drugs are known for being radiosensitisers, which means they increase the DNA damage and tumour cell killing rates of radiotherapy. [23] University of Arkansas physics researchers have developed a simple, cost-effective method to study the effects of chemicals on DNA which has potential to improve the development and testing of life-saving treatments. [22] Scientists at the University of Sheffield studying ancient DNA have created a tool allowing them to more accurately identify ancient Eurasian populations, which can be used to test an individual's similarity to ancient people who once roamed the earth. [21] In new research, Hao Yan of Arizona State University and his colleagues describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1908.0170 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-09 09:49:12

Quantum Approach Protein Folding

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Thanks to a new quantum approach, researchers in China have now found that proteins could fold much faster than previous calculations suggest. [14] What if the brain could detect its own disease? Researchers have been trying to create a material that "thinks" like the brain does, which would be more sensitive to early signs of neurological diseases such as Parkinson's. [13] University Professor of Applied Physics Stephen Arnold and his team at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering have made a discovery that could lead to Star Trek-like biosensor devices capable of flagging the barest presence in blood of a specific virus or antibody, or protein marker for a specific cancer; or sniffing out airborne chemical warfare agents while they are still far below toxic levels. [12] Lead researcher Dr Jonathan Breeze, from Imperial's Department of Materials, said: "This breakthrough paves the way for the widespread adoption of masers and opens the door for a wide array of applications that we are keen to explore. We hope the maser will now enjoy as much success as the laser." [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1908.0165 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-09 17:10:58

Multilayered Tissue-Engineered Construct Based on Biodegradable and Biocompatible Materials for Injured Biliary Tract Repair

Authors: Ilya Klabukov
Comments: 205 Pages.

Design of bioengineered organs is still complicated due to the lack of understanding of biological mechanisms that stimulate physiologically relevant conditions and induce relevant cellular media. Systematic review identified qualitative and quantitative requirements for tissue-engineered construct of the common bile duct. Tissue-specific approach was used to select materials, biologics, and cells for creation of physiologically relevant construct for injured biliary tract repair. Samples of fibrous scaffolds from PCL, PGLA, PLCL, and cellulose diacetate were created by electrospinning method and evaluated with MTT assay for cytotoxicity assessment. Mechanical properties of human bile duct sample and fibrous scaffolds were evaluated for Young's modulus and for percentage of elongation. Mechanical properties of fibrous materials were evaluated in vitro during degradation and erosion in various media. Fibrous PCL-scaffolds were formed by emulsion electrospinning with incorporation of following biomolecules: Neovasculgen gene-therapy drug (VEGF165 plasmid), EGF and GFP. The fluorescent microscopy of fibers confirmed volume modification by biomolecules. ELISA-test confirmed prolonged exit of EGF biomolecules from PCL-scaffold in vitro. Implantation of Neovasculgen-modified PCL-scaffold in rats showed vascular density increase in the implantation zone. Experimental swine model of iatrogenic bile duct injury was created and follow-up implantation of tubular fibrous PCL-scaffold in porcine bile duct showed a tissue-specific physiological biocompatibility of fibrous PCL. Fibrous three-layered scaffolds from PCL and PLCL/PLGA were obtained by electrospinning method and were tested for mechanical properties. The sample of three-layered scaffold from modified fibrous PCL and PLGA with incorporation of EGF and Neovasculgen was two-side seeded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bile duct epithelial cells to obtain the tissue-engineered construct.
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1908.0155 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-10 02:55:27

Blood Spatter Patterns

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Blood spatters are hydrodynamic signatures of violent crimes, often revealing when an event occurred and where the perpetrator and victim were located at the time of the crime. [31] Focused ultrasound from outside the body can safely and reversibly open the blood-brain barrier in patients with Alzheimer's disease, researchers in Canada have shown for the first time. [30] Small vessel vasculitis-inflammation of the small blood vessels-appears as a stain of tiny, red dots covering the skin that, depending on the severity, can evolve into painful pustules or ulcers. [29] Scientists from the University of Freiburg have developed materials systems that are composed of biological components and polymer materials and are capable of perceiving and processing information. [28] Nanotechnology may provide an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, a team of researchers suggests. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1908.0128 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-07 13:45:59

Entropy Explains RNA Diffusion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

By associating these small-scale diffusion rates with time-varying values for entropy, he finds that the rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher RNA diffusion rates. [25] By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and collaborators are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes-the immune cells responsible for antibody production. [24] Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen have developed a method to visualize gene expression of cells with an electron microscope. [23] Researchers at Oregon State University have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors. [22] MIT researchers have now come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis from occurring, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into devices. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18] The DNA molecules are chiral, which means they can exist in two forms which are mirror images, like a left and right hand. The phenomenon was dubbed "chiral induced spin selectivity" (CISS), and over the last few years, several experiments were published allegedly showing this CISS effect, even in electronic devices. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1908.0118 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-08 02:19:38

Traffic Across Blood Vessels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

NUS scientists have discovered a control mechanism that regulates the traffic of cells and substances across blood vessels. This effect can have significant impact on cancer metastasis. [26] By associating these small-scale diffusion rates with time-varying values for entropy, he finds that the rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher RNA diffusion rates. [25] By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and collaborators are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes-the immune cells responsible for antibody production. [24] Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen have developed a method to visualize gene expression of cells with an electron microscope. [23] Researchers at Oregon State University have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors. [22] MIT researchers have now come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis from occurring, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into devices. [21] In a surprising marriage of science and art, researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. [20] Inspired by ideas from the physics of phase transitions and polymer physics, researchers in the Divisions of Physical and Biological Sciences at UC San Diego set out specifically to determine the organization of DNA inside the nucleus of a living cell. [19] Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1908.0117 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-08 02:32:38

Cellulose Nanofibers Improve Lateral Flow Test

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

Scientists from the ICN2 Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group led by ICREA Prof. Arben Merkoçi have carried out a study to enhance the sensitivity of lateral flow tests. [27] NUS scientists have discovered a control mechanism that regulates the traffic of cells and substances across blood vessels. This effect can have significant impact on cancer metastasis. [26] By associating these small-scale diffusion rates with time-varying values for entropy, he finds that the rates of change of entropy in certain time intervals are larger in areas with higher RNA diffusion rates. [25] By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and collaborators are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes—the immune cells responsible for antibody production. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1908.0098 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-05 08:50:10

Carbon Nanotubes Grow Neurons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

This study provides a further step in the design of future biosynthetic hybrids to recover injured nerve tissues functions." [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1908.0097 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-05 10:01:44

Eye-Controlled Human-Machine Interface

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

A research team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a soft robotic lens whose movements are controlled by the eyes-blink twice and the lens zooms in and out; look left, right, up or down and the lens will follow. [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1908.0094 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-05 10:33:07

3D Bioprinting Rebuild Hearts

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in the US has now developed a new technique that makes use of a support gel to 3D print heart tissue containing collagen. [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1908.0092 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-05 11:52:03

Power Generation by Biofuel Cell

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Researchers have developed the first fully functional biofuel cell whose biocatalysts (enzymes that play a critical role in power generation) directly self-assemble onto the electrodes. [42] Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper and simpler alternative to typical DNA origami fabrication, increasing the technique's accessibility and potential impact in industry and clinical settings. [41] Two physicists working out of the University of Florida and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Paul Johns and Juan Nino, conducted research to enhance global nuclear security by improving radiation detectors. [40] Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites are especially successful, and they have been used in optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes and lasers. [39] A new microscope breaks a long-standing speed limit, recording footage of brain activity 15 times faster than scientists once believed possible. [38] Engineers at Duke University have developed a method for extracting a color image from a single exposure of light scattered through a mostly opaque material. [37] Physicists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, have devised a method to turn a non-magnetic metal into a magnet using laser light. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1908.0086 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-06 02:52:52

Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

Researchers have demonstrated that an optical technique known as Raman spectroscopy can be used to differentiate between benign and cancerous thyroid cells. [33] A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in the US has now developed a new technique that makes use of a support gel to 3D print heart tissue containing collagen. [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1908.0084 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-06 03:43:00

Nano-Vaccine for Melanoma

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Researchers at Tel Aviv University have developed a novel nano-vaccine for melanoma, the most aggressive type of skin cancer. [34] Researchers have demonstrated that an optical technique known as Raman spectroscopy can be used to differentiate between benign and cancerous thyroid cells. [33] A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in the US has now developed a new technique that makes use of a support gel to 3D print heart tissue containing collagen. [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology