Physics of Biology

1907 Submissions

[26] viXra:1907.0409 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-21 07:16:07

X-ray Laser Reveals Drug Targets

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

The systematic review of the technology as applied to biology and pharmacology by the MIPT team will no doubt aid other researchers seeking to obtain the structures of key drug targets to develop new medications. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13]
Category: Physics of Biology

[25] viXra:1907.0408 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-21 07:31:06

Collapsing Metal-Organic Frameworks

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a special class of sponge-like materials with nano-sized pores. [23] The systematic review of the technology as applied to biology and pharmacology by the MIPT team will no doubt aid other researchers seeking to obtain the structures of key drug targets to develop new medications. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14]
Category: Physics of Biology

[24] viXra:1907.0373 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-20 01:45:58

Silicon Nanoparticles Against Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Russian scientists from Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, G.G. Devyatykh Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy, together with their European colleagues, have come up with a unique way of using silicon nanoparticles for oncological diagnostics. [23] Researchers at Oregon State University have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors. [22] MIT researchers have now come up with a novel way to prevent fibrosis from occurring, by incorporating a crystallized immunosuppressant drug into devices. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[23] viXra:1907.0360 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-18 13:26:35

Endoscopy Breakthrough Discovery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Carnegie Mellon University's Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Maysam Chamanzar and ECE Ph.D. student Matteo Giuseppe Scopelliti today published research that introduces a novel technique which uses ultrasound to noninvasively take optical images through a turbid medium such as biological tissue to image body's organs. [25] Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[22] viXra:1907.0300 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 07:26:53

CRISP Gene Editing Tools

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

A research collaboration between Tufts University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has led to the development of a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver, according to a study published recently in the journal Advanced Materials. [22] Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[21] viXra:1907.0297 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 07:47:54

Shape-Encoded Mobile Micromachines

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

In a recent study on Nature Materials, Yunus Alapan and co-workers at the departments of physical intelligence and complex materials in Germany and Switzerland described the dynamic self-assembly of mobile micromachines with desired configurations using preprogrammed physical interactions between structural and motor units. [23] A research collaboration between Tufts University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has led to the development of a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver, according to a study published recently in the journal Advanced Materials. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1907.0247 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-14 08:57:42

Explode Molecular Bonds

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

"In biology, it turns out that evolution has selected things that are extremely effective at absorbing the energy and not breaking a bond," Leone said. "When something goes wrong in your chemistry is when you see diseases cropping up." [30] A team of researchers from IBM Research-Zurich, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company and Universidade de Santiago de Compostela has, for the first time, imaged molecules as they change charge states. [29] A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality-a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties. [28] UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. [27] A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1907.0238 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-14 10:01:56

Preventing Colorectal Cancer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Characterizing a tiny protein—determining its shape and what it does—was the first step taken by Dr. Kirsten Wolthers and her colleagues in their effort to learn more about a very common molecule that is implicated in a wide range of human ailments. [33] An international team of researchers has demonstrated how titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves can be used to selectively kill cancer cells – paving the way for more targeted and less harmful treatment. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1907.0233 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 05:00:32

DNA Replication at Atom-Level Detail

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11] Dr Martin Sweatman from the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering has discovered a simple physical principle that might explain how life started on Earth. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9]
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1907.0232 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 05:21:48

Sun-Induced DNA Damage and Cell Repair

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 33 Pages.

A team led by a Baylor University researcher has published a breakthrough article that provides a better understanding of the dynamic process by which sunlight-induced DNA damage is recognized by the molecular repair machinery in cells as needing repair. [20] July 15, 2019) Life depends on double-stranded DNA unwinding and separating into single strands that can be copied for cell division. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have determined at atomic resolution the structure of machinery that drives the process. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12] UZH researchers have discovered a previously unknown way in which proteins interact with one another and cells organize themselves. [11]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1907.0231 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-15 06:19:07

Gene Function Processes of Life

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

Scientists at the University of Kent have developed a new method of determining gene function in a breakthrough that could have major implications for our understanding of the processes of life. [21] A team led by a Baylor University researcher has published a breakthrough article that provides a better understanding of the dynamic process by which sunlight-induced DNA damage is recognized by the molecular repair machinery in cells as needing repair. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1907.0224 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-13 08:21:24

Nanotechnology Delivers Vaccine

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 71 Pages.

Brazilian and European researchers have demonstrated exactly how a nanotechnology-based compound delivers an oral vaccine against hepatitis B to the immune system. [42] A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a novel targeted drug delivery system in the fight against cancer. [41] One day, hospital patients might be able to ingest tiny robots that deliver drugs directly to diseased tissue, thanks to research being carried out at EPFL and ETH Zurich. [40] A team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel has now made such cascades in the lab by encapsulating three enzymes and enzyme cofactors in nanoreactors made from metal-organic framework nanoparticles. [39] Researchers have developed a new form of nanoparticle and associated imaging technique that can detect multiple disease biomarkers, including those for breast cancer, found in deep-tissue in the body. [38] Researchers at University of Utah Health developed a proof-of-concept technology using nanoparticles that could offer a new approach for oral medications. [37] Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), extremely high resolution imaging of the molecule-covered surface structures of silver nanoparticles is possible, even down to the recognition of individual parts of the molecules protecting the surface. [36] A fiber optic sensing system developed by researchers in China and Canada can peer inside supercapacitors and batteries to observe their state of charge. [35] The idea of using a HYPERLINK "https://phys.org/tags/sound+wave/" sound wave in optical fibers initially came from the team's partner researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Joint research projects should follow. [34] Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have constructed a first-of-its-kind optic isolator based on resonance of light waves on a rapidly rotating glass sphere. [33]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1907.0169 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-11 02:14:15

Chord of Life

Authors: Li xiaohong
Comments: 17 Pages.

Meridian phenomenon is the life expression of chord language, obeying the natural law of chord language. The main contents of this paper are: qualitative, quantitative and mathematical expression of the meridian system. Chord language consists of chord spectrum, with quantum, string (opening, closed string, N string), symmetry, mirroring (space-time duality) and other physical, mathematical (geometric) characteristics, manifested in music (time expression), painting (spatial expression), meridian (life expression) and other disciplines, with Spiritual, physica isomorphism, It has thousands of years of knowledge accumulation, more mature mathematical models, can be observed, verified, should be the theoretical characteristics of everything. Chord language is both a spiritual phenomenon and a physical phenomenon. It has spiritual and physical isomorphism. Observing chord language events (music, painting, etc.) is also observing physical events. This is the most prominent philosophical feature of chord language. The meridian can be stimulated by the tone and color light signals, and has the stimulated characteristic frequency, which can be used to quantify the chord language (physical and mathematical) characteristics of the meridian system. Keywords: chord language, chord life, chord mathematics, meridian
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1907.0144 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-08 06:35:26

Nanoparticle Selectively Kills Cancer Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

An international team of researchers has demonstrated how titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves can be used to selectively kill cancer cells – paving the way for more targeted and less harmful treatment. [32] A particularly aggressive, metastasizing form of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, may be treated with nanoscopic particles "imprinted" with specific binding sites for the receptor molecule HER2. [31] UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1907.0125 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-09 02:07:28

Cell Velocity in Collective Migration

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

Depending on the physiological or pathological conditions under consideration, cells can migrate as large and cohesive epithelial sheets. [41] University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have devised a method to create pieces of "smart" glass that can recognize images without requiring any sensors or circuits or power sources. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1907.0121 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-07 08:29:45

Proteins Trapped in Glass

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a unique method for studying proteins which could open new doors for medicinal research. [24] One way we might actually prove our biological complexity is to look at the number of different proteins that our bodies can produce for building all our different types of cells and the other things they need. [23] A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions. [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1907.0119 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-07 09:43:34

Nanowires Recording Intracellular Signals

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Embeddable sensors record how and when neurons fire; electrodes spark heart cells to beat or brain cells to fire; neuron-like devices could even encourage faster regrowth after implantation in the brain. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids-a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation-capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1907.0096 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-05 09:58:11

Rock-Paper-Scissors Game

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Traditionally, the rock-paper-scissors model assumes that all three species have equal strength. [31] UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases. [30] Scientists have been aware of this 'length problem' for a long time, but it was largely overlooked for most of the twentieth century. [29]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1907.0082 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-06 04:24:22

Microfluidic Monolith Device

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Emerging single-cell diagnostics rely on the potential to rapidly and efficiently isolate bacteria from complex biological matrices. [32] A particularly aggressive, metastasizing form of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, may be treated with nanoscopic particles "imprinted" with specific binding sites for the receptor molecule HER2. [31] UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1907.0073 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-04 12:28:33

Length Growth in Biological Systems

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

Scientists have been aware of this 'length problem' for a long time, but it was largely overlooked for most of the twentieth century. [29] Such emulsions are similar to the mixture that forms when you shake an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing, but with much smaller droplets. [28] Russian scientists found that nanocrystal tungsten trioxide can be used instead of barium for X-ray examinations and also in cancer treatment. [27] Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition. [26]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1907.0071 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-04 13:19:54

Directed Evolution of Molecules

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases. [30] Scientists have been aware of this 'length problem' for a long time, but it was largely overlooked for most of the twentieth century. [29] Such emulsions are similar to the mixture that forms when you shake an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing, but with much smaller droplets. [28]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1907.0070 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-04 13:39:58

Tumor Cells by Imprinted Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

A particularly aggressive, metastasizing form of cancer, HER2-positive breast cancer, may be treated with nanoscopic particles "imprinted" with specific binding sites for the receptor molecule HER2. [31] UNC School of Medicine scientists created a powerful new "directed evolution" technique for the rapid development of scientific tools and new treatments for many diseases. [30] Scientists have been aware of this 'length problem' for a long time, but it was largely overlooked for most of the twentieth century. [29] Such emulsions are similar to the mixture that forms when you shake an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing, but with much smaller droplets. [28]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1907.0004 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 04:00:21

In Vitro Blood Vessel Fabrication

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Tao Sun and colleagues from Beijing Institute of Technology have described a novel method to incorporate synthetic microfibres containing magnetic beads into self-assembled tissue micro-rings. [25] By testing a variety of gold nanoparticles, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and collaborators are providing first evidence of their impact upon human B lymphocytes—the immune cells responsible for antibody production. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1907.0003 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 04:43:12

3-D Body Mapping Medical Conditions

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition. [26] Tao Sun and colleagues from Beijing Institute of Technology have described a novel method to incorporate synthetic microfibres containing magnetic beads into self-assembled tissue micro-rings. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1907.0002 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 04:58:06

New Agent for X-Ray

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

Russian scientists found that nanocrystal tungsten trioxide can be used instead of barium for X-ray examinations and also in cancer treatment. [27] Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition. [26] Tao Sun and colleagues from Beijing Institute of Technology have described a novel method to incorporate synthetic microfibres containing magnetic beads into self-assembled tissue micro-rings. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1907.0001 [pdf] submitted on 2019-07-01 05:12:08

Deliver Drugs Through the Skin

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Such emulsions are similar to the mixture that forms when you shake an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing, but with much smaller droplets. [28] Russian scientists found that nanocrystal tungsten trioxide can be used instead of barium for X-ray examinations and also in cancer treatment. [27] Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition. [26]
Category: Physics of Biology