Physics of Biology

1906 Submissions

[21] viXra:1906.0330 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-19 02:46:13

New Force for Optical Tweezers

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

When studying biological cells using optical tweezers, one main issue is the damage caused to the cell by the tool. Giovanni Volpe, University of Gothenburg, has discovered a new type of force that will greatly reduce the amount of light used by optical tweezers-and improve the study of all kinds of cells and particles. [25] The device, which works in the mesoscopic mass range for the first time, might not only be used to help solve fundamental problems in quantum mechanics, it might also find use in precision metrology applications. [24] Although previous research shows that metal nanoparticles have properties useful for various biomedical applications, many mysteries remain regarding how these tiny materials form, including the processes that generate size variations. [23] With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, a pair of NJIT inventors are hoping to bridge this gap. [22] The dark skin pigment melanin protects against the sun's damaging rays by absorbing light energy and converting it to heat. [21] Wang, Bren Professor of Medical Engineering and Electrical Engineering, is using PAM to improve on an existing technology for measuring the oxygen-consumption rate (OCR) in collaboration with Professor Jun Zou at Texas A&M University. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1906.0309 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-18 05:29:28

Reduced Adhesion Create Tumors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

Altering the adhesion at the interface between tissues with different steady-state pressures allows the stable coexistence of the tissues-according to simulations done by physicists in Germany. [45] The molecule has undergone unusually rapid development and is already being tested in a Phase I clinical trial in Japan, under a license from Harvard's Office of Technology Development (OTD) to Eisai. [44] A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists. [43] Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. [42] The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41] A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. [40] Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. [39] A team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has demonstrated a new aqueous polymerization procedure for generating polymer nanoparticles with a single chain and uniform shape, which, by contrast to previous methods, involves high particle concentrations. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects-by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1906.0308 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-16 07:45:57

Fluid Walls Around Living Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. [42] The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41] A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. [40] Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1906.0298 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-17 03:38:13

Shed Light on Lung Disease

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists. [43] Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. [42] The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1906.0297 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-17 04:20:18

Potent Anti-Cancer Agent

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 77 Pages.

The molecule has undergone unusually rapid development and is already being tested in a Phase I clinical trial in Japan, under a license from Harvard's Office of Technology Development (OTD) to Eisai. [44] A hair-sized probe that can measure key indicators of tissue damage deep in the lung has been developed by scientists. [43] Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. [42] The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41] A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. [40] Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. [39] A team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has demonstrated a new aqueous polymerization procedure for generating polymer nanoparticles with a single chain and uniform shape, which, by contrast to previous methods, involves high particle concentrations. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects-by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36] Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. [35]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1906.0293 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-15 08:50:36

Wireless Technologies (4G, 5G) Are Very Harmful to Human Health and Environment: A Preliminary Review

Authors: Victor Christianto, Robert Neil Boyd, Florentin Smarandache
Comments: 3 Pages. This article was writen under guidance of Holy Spirit

The intent of this article is to show that wireless technology is, without remedy other than termination, one of the most devastating environmental and health threats and threats to personal liberty ever created. It is becoming widely known that 4G and 5G technologies cause many harms to human health. Cancer is only one problem, and one that is easily solved. 4G and 5G cause 720! (factorial) different maladies in human beings, and can kill everything that lives but some forms of micro organisms. Some pathogens and certain parasites are made more virulent by selected frequencies of RF. Insects and birds are already being killed by the RF broadcasts. The broadcasts can be controlled to give selected individuals selected maladies. All this needs to be stopped. There are other ways to communicate that do not require radio waves, nor wires, which cause no damage to any form of life. We need to make those methods available to the public, while all the RF systems are being phased out.
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1906.0286 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-15 12:14:43

Gold Nanoclusters in Drugs

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41] A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. [40] Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. [39] A team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has demonstrated a new aqueous polymerization procedure for generating polymer nanoparticles with a single chain and uniform shape, which, by contrast to previous methods, involves high particle concentrations. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects-by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36] Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. [35] For years, researchers have been trying to find ways to grow an optimal nanowire, using crystals with perfectly aligned layers all along the wire. [34] Ferroelectric materials have a spontaneous dipole moment which can point up or down. [33] Researchers have successfully demonstrated that hypothetical particles that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1906.0270 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-14 06:57:39

Virtual Biopsy Device

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

A team headed up at Rutgers University has developed a device that performs virtual biopsies of skin lesions, by combining optical coherence tomography images with stiffness measurements performed simultaneously using vibrational analysis. [27] To diagnose and treat diseases like cancer, scientists and doctors must understand how cells respond to different medical conditions and treatments. [26] Following its recent release of a massive database of chest X-rays, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has now made nearly 10,600 CT scans publicly available to support the development and testing of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for medical applications. [25] AI combined with stem cells promises a faster approach to disease prevention. Andrew Masterson reports. According to product chief Trystan Upstill, the news app "uses the best of artificial intelligence to find the best of human intelligence-the great reporting done by journalists around the globe." [23] Artificial intelligence is astonishing in its potential. It will be more transformative than the PC and the Internet. Already it is poised to solve some of our biggest challenges. [22] In the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), we've often looked for signs of intelligence, technology and communication that are similar to our own. [21] Call it an aMAZE -ing development: A U.K.-based team of researchers has developed an artificial intelligence program that can learn to take shortcuts through a labyrinth to reach its goal. In the process, the program developed structures akin to those in the human brain. [20] And as will be presented today at the 25th annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience networks to enhance their understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. [19] U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1906.0218 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-12 08:13:55

CT Scanning and Diagnosis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

To diagnose and treat diseases like cancer, scientists and doctors must understand how cells respond to different medical conditions and treatments. [26] Following its recent release of a massive database of chest X-rays, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has now made nearly 10,600 CT scans publicly available to support the development and testing of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for medical applications. [25] AI combined with stem cells promises a faster approach to disease prevention. Andrew Masterson reports. According to product chief Trystan Upstill, the news app "uses the best of artificial intelligence to find the best of human intelligence-the great reporting done by journalists around the globe." [23] Artificial intelligence is astonishing in its potential. It will be more transformative than the PC and the Internet. Already it is poised to solve some of our biggest challenges. [22] In the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), we've often looked for signs of intelligence, technology and communication that are similar to our own. [21] Call it an aMAZE -ing development: A U.K.-based team of researchers has developed an artificial intelligence program that can learn to take shortcuts through a labyrinth to reach its goal. In the process, the program developed structures akin to those in the human brain. [20] And as will be presented today at the 25th annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience networks to enhance their understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. [19] U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1906.0203 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-13 02:16:00

Hybrid Nanostructure Light-Harvesting

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

They combined a light-harvesting protein from a cyanobacteria, semiconducting nanocrystals (quantum dots), and a two-dimensional (2-D) semiconducting transition metal only one atomic layer thick. [44] Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nano level. [43] As if they were bubbles expanding in a just-opened bottle of champagne, tiny circular regions of magnetism can be rapidly enlarged to provide a precise method of measuring the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. [42]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1906.0202 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-13 03:17:24

Wave-Paradox Micro-Robotics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Amoeba are unusual creatures that form when a dispersed population of cells spontaneously comes together and reorganizes itself into a multicellular macroscopic organism. [44] Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nano level. [43] As if they were bubbles expanding in a just-opened bottle of champagne, tiny circular regions of magnetism can be rapidly enlarged to provide a precise method of measuring the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. [42]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1906.0135 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-08 11:18:27

Graphene Drug Delivery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tsinghua University (THU) report a sandwiched superstructure for graphene oxide (GO) that transports through cell membranes. [49] The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis. [48] Now, researchers from Brown University's School of Engineering have explained how the phenomenon works, and that explanation could pave the way for a new type of controlled molecular self-assembly. [47] The team has turned graphene oxide (GO) into a soft, moldable and kneadable play dough that can be shaped and reshaped into free-standing, three-dimensional structures. [46]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1906.0132 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-08 13:04:44

How Cells Regulate Division

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports. [27] It's a remarkable choreography. In each of our bodies, more than 37 trillion cells tightly coordinate with other cells to organize into the numerous tissues and organs that make us tick. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1906.0129 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-08 14:57:12

Exploration of the Fundaments of Oncogenesis: A Unified Field Approach to Aetiology

Authors: Richard L Amoroso
Comments: 13 Pages. Preprint: Amoroso, R L. (2018.) pp. 557-569, in Unified Field Mechanics II: Formulations and Empirical Tests, London: World Scientific (https://www.worldscientific.com/worldscibooks/10.1142/10764)

Oncology, a complex multifactor etiology has eluded all-inclusive prevention and remission by a lack of comprehensive understanding of a singular causation at the most fundamental physical level. Current physiological models address the myriad branches but not the global biophysical root of aetiology. Current thinking claims that underlying quantum field dynamics are the ‘basement of reality’. Einstein emphatically stated comparably to his General Relativity, that ‘it was merely a convenient stopping place on the road to a more unified theory’. We propose that oncogenesis (for the several hundred tabulated cancers) occurs from one single causative factor at the root of the three considered branches of causation. Physical science (which includes chemistry, biochemistry or biophysics) has evolved from 3D Newtonian classical mechanics to the current vogue (albeit experimentally verified) of 4D quantum mechanics. Empirical access to the 3rd regime of unified field mechanics (UFM) with inherent additional degrees of freedom is imminent. In regards to that perspective, it is proposed, that a ‘telergic stressor’ mediated by noetic action of the unified field produces conformal change in protein molecules that can cascade into a system of oncogenic specificity. Although the action of this fundamental stressor appears extracurricular to the current investiture on the ‘branches of causation’: Environmental (radiation, chemical), genetic/epigenetic, or psychosomatic; this paradigm shift is in process as threshold violations of QED (Quantum Electrodynamics) are occurring in more than one arena. The epigenome is involved in regulating gene expression, development, tissue differentiation, and suppression of transposable elements. Unlike the underlying genome which is largely static within an individual, the epigenome can be dynamically altered by external conditions. Numerous mutations occur on the pathway to the onset of a cancer; we quantify a single Unified Field noetic effect that applies to the aetiology of all cancer.
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1906.0096 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-08 04:13:44

Infrared Measure Biological Signatures

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have demonstrated a compact frequency-comb apparatus that rapidly measures the entire infrared band of light to detect biological, chemical and physical properties of matter. [34] Studying the brain involves measuring the activity of billions of individual brain cells called neurons. [33] Measuring optical blood flow in the resting human brain to detect spontaneous activity has for the first time been demonstrated by Wright State University imaging researchers, holding out promise for a better way to study people with autism, Alzheimer's and depression. [32]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1906.0089 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-06 08:35:01

Brest Cancer Spreads to Bone

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women, and almost 30% of primary breast tumours metastasize to other organs, with bone among the most frequent metastatic site. [33] According to the Mayo Clinic, about 20% of breast cancers make abnormally high levels of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). [32] A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. [31] In a recent study in mice, researchers found a way to deliver specific drugs to parts of the body that are exceptionally difficult to access. [30] Now MIT engineers have come up with a tissueengineering design that may enable flexible range of motion in injured tendons and muscles during healing. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1906.0064 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-06 05:00:38

Nanotechnology Against Multiple Sclerosis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. [31] In a recent study in mice, researchers found a way to deliver specific drugs to parts of the body that are exceptionally difficult to access. [30] Now MIT engineers have come up with a tissueengineering design that may enable flexible range of motion in injured tendons and muscles during healing. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1906.0063 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-06 05:14:23

DNA Nanorobots Brest Cancer Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

According to the Mayo Clinic, about 20% of breast cancers make abnormally high levels of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). [32] A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. [31] In a recent study in mice, researchers found a way to deliver specific drugs to parts of the body that are exceptionally difficult to access. [30] Now MIT engineers have come up with a tissueengineering design that may enable flexible range of motion in injured tendons and muscles during healing. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1906.0020 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-02 11:33:02

Nanoscale Bioabsorbable Wound

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Scientists at Texas A&M University are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield. [41] Researchers of the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, and Xiamen University, China, have discovered how copper particles at the nanometer scale operate in modifying a carbon-oxygen bond when ketone molecules turn into alcohol molecules. [40]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1906.0005 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-01 04:11:51

DNA Origami Molecular Motors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics. [22] Researchers have devised a magnetic control system to make tiny DNA-based robots move on demand-and much faster than recently possible. [21] Humans have 46 chromosomes, and each one is capped at either end by repetitive sequences called telomeres. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13] Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. [12]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1906.0003 [pdf] submitted on 2019-06-01 04:33:09

Magnetically Actuated Microrobots

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea and one in Switzerland has demonstrated that it is possible to use magnetically actuated microrobots to deliver stem cells to targeted tissue. [23] Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics. [22] Researchers have devised a magnetic control system to make tiny DNA-based robots move on demand-and much faster than recently possible. [21] Humans have 46 chromosomes, and each one is capped at either end by repetitive sequences called telomeres. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19] Researchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. [18] An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA. [17] Chemist Ivan Huc finds the inspiration for his work in the molecular principles that underlie biological systems. [16] What makes particles self-assemble into complex biological structures? [15] Scientists from Moscow State University (MSU) working with an international team of researchers have identified the structure of one of the key regions of telomerase-a so-called "cellular immortality" ribonucleoprotein. [14] Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University used a light-sensitive iridium-palladium catalyst to make "sequential" polymers, using visible light to change how building blocks are combined into polymer chains. [13]
Category: Physics of Biology