Physics of Biology

1905 Submissions

[17] viXra:1905.0479 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-23 07:34:04

Human Cell Division

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

The Allen Institute today released the Integrated Mitotic Stem Cell, a data-driven model and visualization tool that captures—for the first time—a holistic view of human cell division. [45] A team of physicists has devised a novel strategy that uses naturally occurring motions inside the human cell nucleus to measure the physical properties of the nucleus and its components. [44]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1905.0453 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-23 04:49:59

Cancer in a New Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Using the latest advances in imaging and computing, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a framework that's able to reveal the structural and functional changes in the blood vessel network required for growth of a tumour. [33] Medical physicist Dr. Aswin Hoffmann and his team from the Institute of Radiooncology-OncoRay at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a proton beam, thus demonstrating for the first time that in principle, this commonly used imaging method can work with particle beam cancer treatments. [32] Washington State University researchers for the first time have shown that they can use electrical fields to gain valuable information about the tiny, floating vesicles that move around in animals and plants and are critically important to many biological functions. [31] Finding a fast and inexpensive way to detect specific strains of bacteria and viruses is critical to food safety, water quality, environmental protection and human health. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1905.0429 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-21 05:14:45

Extracellular Disease Diagnosis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

A research team led by the University of Notre Dame is working to cut the test time for disease biomarkers. The new timeline-30 minutes instead of 13 hours-uses even smaller sample sizes to offer a new liquid biopsy option. [32] A new focused ultrasound approach-low-energy, rapid, short-pulsed ultrasound-can open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using microbubbles and deliver drugs more uniformly and more safely than methods based on long ultrasound pulses. [31] MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site. [30] Researchers have shown that existing optical fibre technology could be used to produce microscopic 3-D images of tissue inside the body, paving the way towards 3-D optical biopsies. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1905.0428 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-21 06:08:01

Crucial Cellular Switches Protection

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain.
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1905.0405 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 06:17:00

Emergence of Cancer by Exchanging Fields of Microgravity Between Earth's DNA and Dark Dnas in Extra Dimensions

Authors: Alireza Sepehri
Comments: 21 pages, 10 figures

Recently, it has been shown that in the absence of gravity, microgravity let us to explore some new fields which have direct effects on the communications between cells and their growth. We show that the origin of these fields may be some DNA-like structures interior of the earth's core. These structures have a long around $10^{9}$ times the diameter of the earth which are compacted in very smaller places like the core of the earth. This compacting is very similar to the compacting of DNAs interior of cells and leads to the emergence of high temperature and pressure. We measure temperature around DNA-like structures and show that it is in good agreement with predicted temperature of core. Also, we calculate number of microstates of DNA-like structures in microgravity. We will show that DNA-like structures of the core exchange microstates and fields with dark part of DNA in extra dimensions. This dark DNA includes missing genes that are needed for the animal's life and their chemical products can be observed in the activity of body. In microgravity, the absence of gravity lets to DNA-like structures to recover more states of dark DNAs. These extra states accelerate the production of extra cells and may lead to the cancer. To show this, we inject tumor cells into two fertilized eggs and incubate them for 58h. Then, we put one of them in a devices similar to clinostat and try to provide the conditions of incubation in microgravity. We consider the growth of tumor cells under microgravity and compare with normal conditions. We observe that fields of microgravity increase the velocity of production of tumor cells. This experiment confirms our theory that in the absence of gravity, communications between DNA-like structure of the earth and dark DNA leads to the an increase in number of microstates of cancerous cells.
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1905.0403 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-20 07:18:53

Ultrasound Drug Delivery to the Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

A new focused ultrasound approach-low-energy, rapid, short-pulsed ultrasound-can open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using microbubbles and deliver drugs more uniformly and more safely than methods based on long ultrasound pulses. [31] MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site. [30] Researchers have shown that existing optical fibre technology could be used to produce microscopic 3-D images of tissue inside the body, paving the way towards 3-D optical biopsies. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22] Scientists reveal how a 'molecular machine' in bacterial cells prevents fatal DNA twisting, which could be crucial in the development of new antibiotic treatments. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1905.0352 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-18 07:47:20

Biological Nanometer Scale

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. [32] Bioinspired materials mimic their natural counterparts for characteristic functionality in multidisciplinary applications forming a popular theme in biomaterials development. [31] MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site. [30]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1905.0349 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-18 09:11:46

Cholesterol Destruction Code

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

A team of UNSW scientists at the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences led by Professor Andrew Brown have shown how a key enzyme that contributes to cholesterol production can be regulated-and destroyed-using a particular molecule. [33] Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. [32] Bioinspired materials mimic their natural counterparts for characteristic functionality in multidisciplinary applications forming a popular theme in biomaterials development. [31] MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site. [30] Researchers have shown that existing optical fibre technology could be used to produce microscopic 3-D images of tissue inside the body, paving the way towards 3-D optical biopsies. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1905.0255 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-16 08:00:31

Laser in Biopsy Technique

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

To a patient, the analysis of a tissue biopsy sample to check for something like cancer may seem like a relatively simple process, even if it does mean giving up a small piece of flesh to be tested. [20] A remote command could one day send immune cells on a rampage against a malignant tumor. The ability to mobilize, from outside the body, targeted cancer immunotherapy inside the body has taken a step closer to becoming reality. [19]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1905.0242 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-17 03:16:09

Effects of Radiation on DNA

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Scientists from TSU's Laboratory of Experimental High Energy Physics and their colleagues from the University of Bordeaux are studying new ways of modeling the effects of low doses of radiation at the cellular level. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18] DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. [17]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1905.0138 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-09 21:52:58

Possible Traces of Resonant Signaling in the Genome

Authors: Ivan Savelyev, Max Myakishev-Rempel
Comments: 26 Pages.

Since so far, there is no published evidence for the resonant genomic signaling, we attempted searching for its traces in the genome computationally. Since we believe that the majority of repetitive sequences in the genome are involved in meaningful resonant signaling, we hypothesized that some of the unique (non-repetitive) sequences in the genome might have evolved to resonate with the genomic repeats. Accordingly, we hypothesized that it is not necessary for the unique sequence to be identical to the repeat, that for resonance, it might need to be only superficially similar to the sequence of the repeat: for example, it is possible that some oscillations involve primarily the electron clouds of the aromatic rings (Savelyev et al., 2019). This way only purine-pyrimidine structure of the resonating sequences should be similar and their primary sequences could be different. This simplification of the sequence from the primary sequence to the purine-pyrimidine sequence is further called "purine code". Similarly, for the oscillations which involve primarily the proton clouds of the delocalized protons of the hydrogen bonds in basepairs, only the patterns of these bonds should be similar and the primary sequence could be different. This simplification of the sequence from primary to strong/weak (3 bonds /2 bonds per base pair) is further called "strong code".
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1905.0129 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-08 13:08:00

Number of Microstates of Dark Dnas in Extra Dimensions for Normal and Cancerous Cells

Authors: Alireza Sepehri
Comments: 17 Pages.

Recently, Hargreaves ( New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3168, March 2018, Pages 29-31 ) has argued that some animal genomes seem to be missing certain genes, ones that appear in other similar species and must be present to keep the animals alive. He called these apparently missing genes by “dark DNA”. On the other hand, Sepehri and his collaborations ( Open Physics, 16(1), pp. 463-475) has discussed that some biological events like DNA teleportation and water memory may be due to existence of some extra genes in extra dimensions. Collecting these results, we can conclude that origin of some cancers may be evolutions of dark DNA in extra dimension. To show this, we propose a model for calculating number of microstates of a DNA for a chick embryo in extra dimension and compare with experimental data. We show that number of microstates in extra dimension for a normal chick embryo is liss than number of microstates for a cancerous chick embryo. In fact, extra microstates are transformed to four dimensions.
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1905.0090 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-05 12:03:39

Protein Structures from Tiny Crystals

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans—and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. [24] How did life arise on Earth? Rutgers researchers have found among the first and perhaps only hard evidence that simple protein catalysts—essential for cells, the building blocks of life, to function—may have existed when life began. [23]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1905.0089 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-05 12:20:10

Biomedical Devices with Fluorescence

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. [25] Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans—and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. [24]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1905.0022 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-01 08:45:19

Smart Particles Image

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Now the Nano Antioxidants project is ready to be launched on the SpaceX's Dragon supply spacecraft this week from Cape Canaveral, in the United States, towards the International Space Station. [32] Bioinspired materials mimic their natural counterparts for characteristic functionality in multidisciplinary applications forming a popular theme in biomaterials development. [31] MIT engineers have designed tiny robots that can help drug-delivery nanoparticles push their way out of the bloodstream and into a tumor or another disease site. [30] Researchers have shown that existing optical fibre technology could be used to produce microscopic 3-D images of tissue inside the body, paving the way towards 3-D optical biopsies. [29] Researchers at MIT, working with surgeons and oncologists at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), have now developed a way to improve the accuracy of this surgery, called debulking. [28] Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. [27] Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. [26] RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. [25] Researchers from the University of Chicago have developed a high-throughput RNA sequencing strategy to study the activity of the gut microbiome. [24] Today a large international consortium of researchers published a complex but important study looking at how DNA works in animals. [23] Asymmetry plays a major role in biology at every scale: think of DNA spirals, the fact that the human heart is positioned on the left, our preference to use our left or right hand ... [22]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1905.0020 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-01 09:14:45

Biomarkers Accuracy Boost

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Researchers have created a system that can detect and quantify small and rare biological molecules that are important for detecting disease early. [33] Now the Nano Antioxidants project is ready to be launched on the SpaceX's Dragon supply spacecraft this week from Cape Canaveral, in the United States, towards the International Space Station. [32] Bioinspired materials mimic their natural counterparts for characteristic functionality in multidisciplinary applications forming a popular theme in biomaterials development. [31]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1905.0017 [pdf] submitted on 2019-05-01 09:45:11

Promising Role of Fractional Calculus in Biomedicine and Biophysics

Authors: Hosein Nasrolahpour
Comments: 2 Pages.

The study of complex systems and investigation of their structural and dynamical properties have attracted considerable interests among scientists in general and physicists, biologists and medical scientists in particular. Complex systems can be found almost everywhere however the highest level of complexities are related to living and biological organisms and systems. Due to the lack of a reliable and effective tool to investigate such systems, we have not reached to the complete understanding and comprehensive pictures of the phenomena and processes which occur in these systems. Of course a comprehensive knowledge of biological and biomedical complex phenomena will be achieved when we employ simultaneously different field of science and engineering including: biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, mechanical engineering and so on.
Category: Physics of Biology