Physics of Biology

1903 Submissions

[24] viXra:1903.0411 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-22 09:10:24

Stem Cells are not Created Equal

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Researchers from the University of Toronto's Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and the Donnelly Centre have discovered a population of cells – dubbed to be "elite" – that play a key role in the process of transforming differentiated cells into stem cells. [26] Researchers at A*STAR have compared six data-analysis processes and come up with a clear winner in terms of speed, quality of analysis and reliability. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[23] viXra:1903.0402 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-21 08:55:43

Optical Force in Human Red Blood

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

New photonic tools for medical imaging can be used to understand the nonlinear behavior of laser light in human blood for theranostic applications. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19]
Category: Physics of Biology

[22] viXra:1903.0401 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-21 09:22:56

Microscope Captures Group of Neurons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Researchers have developed a microscope specifically for imaging large groups of interacting cells in their natural environments. [28] New photonic tools for medical imaging can be used to understand the nonlinear behavior of laser light in human blood for theranostic applications. [27] Using X-ray laser technology, a team led by researchers of the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI has recorded one of the fastest processes in biology. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20] Just like any long polymer chain, DNA tends to form knots. Using technology that allows them to stretch DNA molecules and image the behavior of these knots, MIT researchers have discovered, for the first time, the factors that determine whether a knot moves along the strand or "jams" in place. [19]
Category: Physics of Biology

[21] viXra:1903.0395 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-21 14:20:50

Bio-Electromagnetic Weapons

Authors: Frank H. Makinson
Comments: 3 Pages.

The first use of a bio-electromagnetic weapon in warfare began about 1000 years ago, but the creators of that weapon were unaware of the term electromagnetic and its contribution to the unseen biological damage it was causing to the human subjects. The thousand year old weapon was the creation of the black powder chemical explosion. A Los Alamos National Laboratory report stated, “The emission of electromagnetic radiation from a chemical explosion is well established.” It is not just the light produced but the broadband electromagnetic radiation. Similar biological damage can be caused by various types of radio transmitters that radiate their emissions into the atmosphere.
Category: Physics of Biology

[20] viXra:1903.0375 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-20 14:32:36

Neutrons Paint Atomic Portrait

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme—protein kinase A or PKA—will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. [22] The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[19] viXra:1903.0327 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-19 06:20:43

Image Deep into the Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, in which a fluorophore absorbs more than one photon and emits light at a shorter wavelength than the excitation source, can be used to create 3D tissue images at depths of 1 mm or more. [23] Researchers at the University of Twente have designed a tiny needle in which micro-channels can be used for extracting small liquid samples from a local area of the brain. [22] The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[18] viXra:1903.0313 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-16 07:55:10

Important Cell Division Discovery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Dundee have provided important new insights into the regulation of cell division, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of cancer progression. [23] Researchers at the University of Twente have designed a tiny needle in which micro-channels can be used for extracting small liquid samples from a local area of the brain. [22] The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. [21]
Category: Physics of Biology

[17] viXra:1903.0292 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-16 06:03:58

Neutron Protein Crystallography

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. [21] The conclusion that proteins have a terrible conductance tallies well with their general physical characteristics – they lack both electronic conduction bands and high levels of structural order. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[16] viXra:1903.0291 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-16 06:42:56

Neurotransmitters in the Brain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Twente have designed a tiny needle in which micro-channels can be used for extracting small liquid samples from a local area of the brain. [22] The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. [21] The conclusion that proteins have a terrible conductance tallies well with their general physical characteristics – they lack both electronic conduction bands and high levels of structural order. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[15] viXra:1903.0284 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-14 09:35:44

Netflix Speed Up Biological Imaging

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

To speed up the imaging process, the researchers made their Raman system more compatible with the algorithm. [29] The researchers have tested the virtual frame technique using several types of cameras with different sensitivities and bit depths ranging from sophisticated high-speed and high-end consumer cameras to smartphone cameras. [28] IBM researchers are applying deep learning to discover ways to overcome some of the technical challenges that AI can face when analyzing X-rays and other medical images. [27] Now, a team of A*STAR researchers and colleagues has developed a detector that can successfully pick out where human actions will occur in videos, in almost real-time. [26] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and the U.S. has developed a deep learning algorithm that can be used for motion capture of animals of any kind. [25] In 2016, when we inaugurated our new IBM Research lab in Johannesburg, we took on this challenge and are reporting our first promising results at Health Day at the KDD Data Science Conference in London this month. [24] The research group took advantage of a system at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that combines machine learning-a form of artificial intelligence where computer algorithms glean knowledge from enormous amounts of data-with experiments that quickly make and screen hundreds of sample materials at a time. [23] Researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. [22] Such are the big questions behind one of the new projects underway at the MIT-IBM Watson AI Laboratory, a collaboration for research on the frontiers of artificial intelligence. [21] The possibility of cognitive nuclear-spin processing came to Fisher in part through studies performed in the 1980s that reported a remarkable lithium isotope dependence on the behavior of mother rats. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[14] viXra:1903.0216 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-11 12:41:42

Redefine Protein Conductances

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

The conclusion that proteins have a terrible conductance tallies well with their general physical characteristics – they lack both electronic conduction bands and high levels of structural order. [20] In their proof-of-concept study, the protein nanowires formed an electrically conductive network when introduced into the polymer polyvinyl alcohol. [19] Nanocages are highly interesting molecular constructs, from the point of view of both fundamental science and possible applications. [18]
Category: Physics of Biology

[13] viXra:1903.0198 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-10 08:48:01

Scoring Protein Interactions

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have created a novel way to define individual protein associations in a quick, efficient, and informative way. [28] Scientists of the D'Or Institute for Research and Education have improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. [27] Migrating cells must overcome physical barriers such as tight pores in finely meshed tissues. A recent study by a team of LMU biophysicists provides a new theory to describe how cells manoeuvre such confining environments. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[12] viXra:1903.0196 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-10 09:22:44

Motility of Swimming Euglena

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Some species of Euglenids, a diversified family of aquatic unicellular organisms, can perform large-amplitude, elegantly coordinated body deformations. [29] Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have created a novel way to define individual protein associations in a quick, efficient, and informative way. [28] Scientists of the D'Or Institute for Research and Education have improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. [27] Migrating cells must overcome physical barriers such as tight pores in finely meshed tissues. A recent study by a team of LMU biophysicists provides a new theory to describe how cells manoeuvre such confining environments. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12] Thumb through any old science textbook, and you'll likely find RNA described as little more than a means to an end, a kind of molecular scratch paper used to construct the proteins encoded in DNA. [20]
Category: Physics of Biology

[11] viXra:1903.0195 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-10 09:42:47

ABS of Molecular Engines

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Peroxisomes are cell organelles that carry out a number of functions, including the degradation of cytotoxins. [30] Some species of Euglenids, a diversified family of aquatic unicellular organisms, can perform large-amplitude, elegantly coordinated body deformations. [29] Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have created a novel way to define individual protein associations in a quick, efficient, and informative way. [28] Scientists of the D'Or Institute for Research and Education have improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. [27] Migrating cells must overcome physical barriers such as tight pores in finely meshed tissues. A recent study by a team of LMU biophysicists provides a new theory to describe how cells manoeuvre such confining environments. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25] In work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland in College Park, researchers have devised and demonstrated a new way to measure free energy. [24] A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy. [23] Micro-computed tomography or "micro-CT" is X-ray imaging in 3-D, by the same method used in hospital CT (or "CAT") scans, but on a small scale with massively increased resolution. [22] A new experimental method permits the X-ray analysis of amyloids, a class of large, filamentous biomolecules which are an important hallmark of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. [12]
Category: Physics of Biology

[10] viXra:1903.0124 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-07 13:07:12

Cross Effect of Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Authors: Toshiro Takami
Comments: 12 Pages.

I statistically analyzed 27 patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. Since the 1930's, it has been said that the neurofibromatosis type 1 born to affected mothers is very serious. It is called "maternal effect". But many are against the opinion. The result of my examination is as follows. The male cases born to affected mothers or the female cases born to affected fathers have extremely possibility of having malignant tumors. The male cases born to affected fathers or the female cases born to affected mathers or those who were new mutations didn't have malignant tumors. They were all benign. "When the tumor is found in the male cases born to affected mothers or female cases born to affected fathers, it is extremely possible that the tumor is malignant." I newly name it "cross effect".
Category: Physics of Biology

[9] viXra:1903.0076 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-06 04:42:45

Physical Barriers of Migrating Cells

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Migrating cells must overcome physical barriers such as tight pores in finely meshed tissues. A recent study by a team of LMU biophysicists provides a new theory to describe how cells manoeuvre such confining environments. [26] A Virginia Commonwealth University researcher has developed a procedure for identifying the source of cells present in a forensic biological sample that could change how cell types are identified in samples across numerous industries. [25]
Category: Physics of Biology

[8] viXra:1903.0072 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-04 08:17:24

Network Human Physiology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

This week at the 2019 American Physical Society March Meeting in Boston, Plamen Ch. Ivanov, a Boston University physicist affiliated with Harvard Medical School, will present a new paradigm called "network physiology." [46] The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea developed a thermoelectric module that generates electricity using human body heat. [45]
Category: Physics of Biology

[7] viXra:1903.0069 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-04 10:23:16

Errors in Biomedical Research Results

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 82 Pages.

Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research. [47] This week at the 2019 American Physical Society March Meeting in Boston, Plamen Ch. Ivanov, a Boston University physicist affiliated with Harvard Medical School, will present a new paradigm called "network physiology." [46] The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea developed a thermoelectric module that generates electricity using human body heat. [45]
Category: Physics of Biology

[6] viXra:1903.0058 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-03 05:55:25

X-ray Improve CT Scanners

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 81 Pages.

A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors. [46] The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea developed a thermoelectric module that generates electricity using human body heat. [45]
Category: Physics of Biology

[5] viXra:1903.0042 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-02 06:29:19

Electricity of Human Body Heat

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 79 Pages.

The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea developed a thermoelectric module that generates electricity using human body heat. [45] Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. [44] Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. [43]
Category: Physics of Biology

[4] viXra:1903.0018 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-01 11:56:55

Action of Drugs via Infrared Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

Using pulsed infrared light lasers, scientists have activated molecules located inside neural tissue with an efficiency of almost 100 percent. [41] DNA damage is occurring in our cells all the time due to external agents, such as exposure to sun, or internal agents, like reactive oxygen species. To detect and repair DNA lesions, cells have evolved DNA damage response. [40] When Greg Bowman presents a slideshow about the proteins he studies, their 3-D shapes and folding patterns play out as animations on a big screen. [39]
Category: Physics of Biology

[3] viXra:1903.0017 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-01 13:04:57

Protein Structures Change

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study the structure of a protein "strain absorber" as it changes during muscle contractions. [42] Using pulsed infrared light lasers, scientists have activated molecules located inside neural tissue with an efficiency of almost 100 percent. [41] DNA damage is occurring in our cells all the time due to external agents, such as exposure to sun, or internal agents, like reactive oxygen species. To detect and repair DNA lesions, cells have evolved DNA damage response. [40]
Category: Physics of Biology

[2] viXra:1903.0016 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-01 13:21:54

Gene Constrains DNA Movements

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 76 Pages.

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. [43] Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study the structure of a protein "strain absorber" as it changes during muscle contractions. [42] Using pulsed infrared light lasers, scientists have activated molecules located inside neural tissue with an efficiency of almost 100 percent. [41]
Category: Physics of Biology

[1] viXra:1903.0009 [pdf] submitted on 2019-03-02 04:57:25

Correct Genetic Errors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 78 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. [44] Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. [43] Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study the structure of a protein "strain absorber" as it changes during muscle contractions. [42]
Category: Physics of Biology