High Energy Particle Physics

1912 Submissions

[9] viXra:1912.0216 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-11 11:04:37

Leptonic Decay D+->T+VT

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 87 Pages.

The Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) collaboration, a large team of researchers from universities worldwide conducting particle physics studies has recently reported the first observation of the leptonic decay D+→τ+ντ. [48] Instead, it involves smashing electrons into protons at nearly the speed of light, then measuring how far the electrons travel when they bounce off, or scatter, from the protons. [47] Ten years ago, just about any nuclear physicist could tell you the approximate size of the proton. But that changed in 2010, when atomic physicists unveiled a new method that promised a more precise measurement. [46]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[8] viXra:1912.0185 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-10 10:00:44

Accelerators Clean the Environment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

All that was needed was some intrepid scientist or engineer to come up with an accelerator that was cost-effective, compact and user-friendly enough to clean wastewater on an industrial scale. [43] Electrical engineers in the accelerator physics group at TU Darmstadt have developed a design for a laser-driven electron accelerator so small it could be produced on a silicon chip. [42] Using short laser pulses, a research team led by Misha Ivanov of the Max Born Institute in Berlin, together with scientists from the Russian Quantum Center in Moscow, has shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within these novel materials. [41]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[7] viXra:1912.0178 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-09 13:01:42

Proton-Hydrogen Collision Model

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 84 Pages.

The motions of plasmas may be notoriously difficult to model, but they can be better understood by analysing what happens when protons are scattered by atoms of hydrogen. [47] Ten years ago, just about any nuclear physicist could tell you the approximate size of the proton. But that changed in 2010, when atomic physicists unveiled a new method that promised a more precise measurement. [46] “Spin has surprises. Everybody thought it’s simple … and it turns out it’s much more complicated,” Aschenauer says. [45]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[6] viXra:1912.0113 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-06 05:10:56

Strong Lasers Fusion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

During nuclear fusion two atomic nuclei fuse into one new nucleus. In the lab this can be done by particle accelerators, when researchers use fusion reactions to create fast free neutrons for other experiments. [15] A new 3-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation tool developed by researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and CEA Saclay is enabling cutting-edge simulations of laser/plasma coupling mechanisms that were previously out of reach of standard PIC codes used in plasma research. [14] Researchers from Osaka University have developed a technique for improving accuracy of laser beam shaping and wavefront obtained by conventional methods with no additional cost by optimizing virtual phase grating. [13]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[5] viXra:1912.0094 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-05 14:23:18

Alternate Models of Some of the Leptons

Authors: William L. Stubbs
Comments: 9 Pages.

It is shown here that the three leptons, the electron, the muon and the tau, appear to not be fundamental as declared by the Standard Model of Particle Physics, but are, instead, made of component particles. Electron-like particles here dubbed beta electrons and beta positron make up muons and free electrons. Muons are made of 103 beta electron-beta positron pairs plus a valence beta electron or beta positron surrounding a muon neutrino or antineutrino. The electron is beta electron orbiting an electron neutrino and the positron, a beta positron orbiting an electron antineutrino. The tau also appears to be beta electrons and beta positrons surrounding a tau neutrino or antineutrino; however, a definitive model is not offered here. Consequently, all three leptons and their antiparticles appear to be made of the beta electrons and positrons and their respective neutrinos or antineutrinos.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[4] viXra:1912.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-04 12:14:26

The Particles Inside the Proton

Authors: William L. Stubbs
Comments: 10 Pages.

It shows here that the results of the electron-proton deep inelastic scattering experiments can be interpreted to show that the proton and the neutron are made of eight pions. The experiments also appear to show that the pions are made of electrons and positrons. Consequently, the proton appears to be made of 917 electrons and 918 positrons.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[3] viXra:1912.0060 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-03 04:37:43

Laser Beams Meet Plasma

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

New research from the University of Rochester will enhance the accuracy of computer models used in simulations of laser-driven implosions. [39] By using an infrared laser beam to induce a phenomenon known as an electron avalanche breakdown near the material, the new technique is able to detect shielded material from a distance. [38] The light scattered by plasmonic nanoparticles is useful, but some of it gets lost at the surface and scientists are now starting to figure out why. [37] In a new review, researchers have described the fundamental physics that causes magnetoelectricity from a theoretical viewpoint. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32] Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light. [31] Materials scientists at Duke University computationally predicted the electrical and optical properties of semiconductors made from extended organic molecules sandwiched by inorganic structures. [30] KU Leuven researchers from the Roeffaers Lab and the Hofkens Group have now put forward a very promising direct X-ray detector design, based on a rapidly emerging halide perovskite semiconductor, with chemical formula Cs2AgBiBr6. [29]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[2] viXra:1912.0059 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-03 05:15:03

Controlling Antimatter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 32 Pages.

The success of ALPHA and ASACUSA has also inspired a new generation of antimatter experiments. [25] Mysterious radiation emitted from distant corners of the galaxy could finally be explained with efforts to recreate a unique state of matter that blinked into existence in the first moments after the Big Bang. [24] Researchers at Oregon State University have confirmed that last fall's union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst. [23] Quark matter – an extremely dense phase of matter made up of subatomic particles called quarks – may exist at the heart of neutron stars. [22]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[1] viXra:1912.0017 [pdf] submitted on 2019-12-02 02:51:54

Neutrino Experiments

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

If it turns out that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate in a different way from one another, this may partially account for the present-day matter–antimatter imbalance. [21] Studying this really interesting particle that's all around us, and yet is so hard to measure, that could hold the key to understanding why we're here at all, is exciting—and I get to do this for a living," says Mauger. [20] In the Standard Model of particle physics, elementary particles acquire their masses by interacting with the Higgs field. This process is governed by a delicate mechanism: electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). [19]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics