High Energy Particle Physics

1704 Submissions

[22] viXra:1704.0401 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-30 07:46:35

Performance of the ATLAS

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

A new age of exploration dawned at the start of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider, as protons began colliding at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. [14] UNIST has taken a major step toward laying the technical groundwork for developing next-generation high-intensity accelerators by providing a new advanced theoretical tool for the design and analysis of complex beam lines with strong coupling. [13] A targeted way to manipulate beams of protons accelerated using ultrashort and ultraintense laser pulses has been demonstrated by a team of researchers led at the University of Strathclyde. [12] The work elucidates the interplay between collective and single-particle excitations in nuclei and proposes a quantitative theoretical explanation. It has as such great potential to advance our understanding of nuclear structure. [11] When two protons approaching each other pass close enough together, they can " feel " each other, similar to the way that two magnets can be drawn closely together without necessarily sticking together. According to the Standard Model, at this grazing distance, the protons can produce a pair of W bosons. [10] The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists from France, Germany, and Hungary headed by Zoltán Fodor, a researcher from Wuppertal, has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. [9] Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Lattice QCD gives the same results as the diffraction patterns of the electromagnetic oscillators, explaining the color confinement and the asymptotic freedom of the Strong Interactions.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[21] viXra:1704.0377 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-28 09:27:43

Electron Populations in Plasmas

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 24 Pages.

Measuring small fast electron populations hidden in a sea of colder "thermal" electrons in tokamak plasmas is very challenging. [17] Magnetic reconnection, a universal process that triggers solar flares and northern lights and can disrupt cell phone service and fusion experiments, occurs much faster than theory says that it should. [16] A surprising new class of X-ray pulsating variable stars has been discovered by a team of American and Canadian astronomers led by Villanova University's Scott Engle and Edward Guinan. [15] Late last year, an international team including researchers from the Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (KIAA) at Peking University announced the discovery of more than 60 extremely distant quasars, nearly doubling the number known to science-and thus providing dozens of new opportunities to look deep into our universe's history. [14] Fuzzy pulsars orbiting black holes could unmask quantum gravity. [13] Cosmologists trying to understand how to unite the two pillars of modern science – quantum physics and gravity – have found a new way to make robust predictions about the effect of quantum fluctuations on primordial density waves, ripples in the fabric of space and time. [12] Physicists have performed a test designed to investigate the effects of the expansion of the universe—hoping to answer questions such as "does the expansion of the universe affect laboratory experiments?", "might this expansion change the lengths of solid objects and the time measured by atomic clocks differently, in violation of Einstein's equivalence principle?", and "does spacetime have a foam-like structure that slightly changes the speed of photons over time?", an idea that could shed light on the connection between general relativity and quantum gravity. [11] Einstein's equivalence principle states that an object in gravitational free fall is physically equivalent to an object that is accelerating with the same amount of force in the absence of gravity. This principle lies at the heart of general relativity and has been experimentally tested many times. Now in a new paper, scientists have experimentally demonstrated a conceptually new way to test the equivalence principle that could detect the effects of a relatively new concept called spin-gravity coupling. [10] A recent peer-reviewed paper by physicist James Franson from the University of Maryland in the US has initiated a stir among physics community. Issued in the New Journal of Physics, the paper points to evidence proposing that the speed of light as defined by the theory of general relativity, is slower than originally thought. [9] Gravitational time dilation causes decoherence of composite quantum systems. Even if gravitons are there, it's probable that we would never be able to perceive them. Perhaps, assuming they continue inside a robust model of quantum gravity, there may be secondary ways of proving their actuality. [7] The magnetic induction creates a negative electric field, causing an electromagnetic inertia responsible for the relativistic mass change; it is the mysterious Higgs Field giving mass to the particles. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The self maintained electric potential of the accelerating charges equivalent with the General Relativity space-time curvature, and since it is true on the quantum level also, gives the base of the Quantum Gravity. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the relativistic quantum theory.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[20] viXra:1704.0374 [pdf] replaced on 2017-05-09 12:07:41

New Discoveries in Parkhomov’s 60co Astro-Catalyzed Beta Decay

Authors: Yanming Wei
Comments: 7 pages, 1 figure. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.30632.98564

In 2011, Russian experimental physicist Parkhomov delivered a paper: “Deviations from Beta Radioactivity Exponential Drop”. It seems that his explanation on the observed phenomenon is little bit shallow. Hereby I present my new 5 discoveries based on his experiment settings and data, and try to generalize it as profound lemma. 1-Good use of neutrinos can greatly accelerate beta decay; 2-Low energy neutrinos can reflect on mirror; 3-Boson quasi-particle comprising neutrinos in even number can be formed under focusing condition; 4-Such a quasi-particle in high spin can excite nucleus to overcome high spin lock; 5-Only β- decay can be catalyzed by neutrinos, as well as only β+ or electric capture decay can be catalyzed by antineutrinos, otherwise converse will be slowed down.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[19] viXra:1704.0372 [pdf] replaced on 2017-05-24 10:14:27

A Bold Innovation on Artificial Neutrinos Source

Authors: Yanming Wei
Comments: 11 pages, 3 figures. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.34378.36804

It is well known that neutrinos come out of nuclear β decay, but radioactive materials do harm to human beings, and either energy spectrum or dose cannot be flexibly controlled because of the only dependence on selected nuclide and mass. This paper presents a new way to build neutrinos source by only accurately manipulating electrons motion. Because voltage supply can hardly reach MV-level, thus this method is not competent to generate high energy neutrinos, and only good for low energy, especially a convenient means for range 1eV to 100keV.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[18] viXra:1704.0358 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-27 05:13:57

Lepton Flavour Non-Universality from the Scale-Symmetric Theory

Authors: Sylwester Kornowski
Comments: 7 Pages.

In recent years, LHCb has found hints of deviations from the Standard-Model (SM) predictions that point new physics (NP). The lepton flavour universality is violated when comparing rates of decays of B mesons into excited kaon and lepton-antilepton pair with different flavours. Here, applying the Scale-Symmetric Theory (SST), we calculated the ratio of such decay rates when there appears a pair of muons or electron-positron pair. In the low-squared-q region (0.045 < qq < 1.1 GeV^2/c^4)), we obtained ratio = 0.6603 and in the central-squared-q region (qq > 1.1), we obtained ratio = 0.6850. The SST results are consistent with the central values obtained in the LHCb experiments 0.660 and 0.685 respectively. We can compare the LHCb and SST results with the SM predictions that give values close to unity. The SM results are inconsistent with the LHCb data having a statistical significance of 2.2 - 2.5 sigma. We showed that the decrease from about 1 in SM to 0.6603 in SST follows from different structure of muon and electron and from creation of additional electron-positron pair near bare muon, whereas the increase in SST from 0.6603 to 0.6850 is a result of the weak interactions of a pair of muons with nucleon at q higher than some threshold energy equal to 1.05 or 1.06 GeV/c^2 i.e. the squared q should be higher than about 1.1. We do not need a heavy Z’ boson or leptoquarks to explain the deviations from SM - we need a lacking part of SM i.e. we need the SST which is the NP.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[17] viXra:1704.0276 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-21 11:44:58

Foot Step Power Generation Using Piezoelectric Transducer

Authors: Abdul Kalam, Akash singh, Sachin Yadav, Kuldeep Yadav
Comments: 3 Pages.

It has the ability to produce electric power from mechanical reaction (force) and then it change to electric charges. This kind of technology can be used as the alternative electric power generator. It is impossible to replace the existing electricity generation, but at least to vary and reduce the dependency on the conventional electricity generation. Design concept used in this thesis is to use piezoelectric place at the walking area named as “Foot Step Power Generation System”. When a human walking, jumping or dancing on the surface which contain the piezoelectric, it then will produce sufficient force for energy generation process. This system is very suitable applied at the public spotted area with many people such as walking corridor, shopping mall, in the office, schools and others. Therefore, the continued pressure will provide sufficient resources to be used to produce the electricity required. Keywords—new technology, piezoelectricity, piezoelectric material, generate power, force or pressure
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[16] viXra:1704.0275 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-21 11:19:33

Laser Neutron Yield

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

A team of researchers from several institutions in China has developed a new way to produce neutrons that they claim improves on conventional methods by a factor of 100. [15] A research team led by UCLA electrical engineers has developed a new technique to control the polarization state of a laser that could lead to a new class of powerful, high-quality lasers for use in medical imaging, chemical sensing and detection, or fundamental science research. [14] UCLA physicists have shown that shining multicolored laser light on rubidium atoms causes them to lose energy and cool to nearly absolute zero. This result suggests that atoms fundamental to chemistry, such as hydrogen and carbon, could also be cooled using similar lasers, an outcome that would allow researchers to study the details of chemical reactions involved in medicine. [13] Powerful laser beams, given the right conditions, will act as their own lenses and "self-focus" into a tighter, even more intense beam. University of Maryland physicists have discovered that these self-focused laser pulses also generate violent swirls of optical energy that strongly resemble smoke rings. [12] Electrons fingerprint the fastest laser pulses. [11] A team of researchers with members from Germany, the U.S. and Russia has found a way to measure the time it takes for an electron in an atom to respond to a pulse of light. [10] As an elementary particle, the electron cannot be broken down into smaller particles, at least as far as is currently known. However, in a phenomenon called electron fractionalization, in certain materials an electron can be broken down into smaller "charge pulses," each of which carries a fraction of the electron's charge. Although electron fractionalization has many interesting implications, its origins are not well understood. [9] New ideas for interactions and particles: This paper examines the possibility to origin the Spontaneously Broken Symmetries from the Planck Distribution Law. This way we get a Unification of the Strong, Electromagnetic, and Weak Interactions from the interference occurrences of oscillators. Understanding that the relativistic mass change is the result of the magnetic induction we arrive to the conclusion that the Gravitational Force is also based on the electromagnetic forces, getting a Unified Relativistic Quantum Theory of all 4 Interactions.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[15] viXra:1704.0248 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-19 13:49:06

Superconducting Linear Accelerator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 21 Pages.

The international X-ray laser European XFEL has reached one of its final major milestones on the way to scientific user operation. DESY has successfully commissioned the particle accelerator, which drives the X-ray laser along its full length. [17] Physicists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with researchers in South Korea and Germany, have developed a theoretical framework for improving the stability and intensity of particle accelerator beams. [16] For several decades now, scientists from around the world have been pursuing a ridiculously ambitious goal: They hope to develop a nuclear fusion reactor that would generate energy in the same manner as the sun and other stars, but down here on Earth. [15] It's the particles' last lap of the ring. On 5 December 2016, protons and lead ions circulated in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the last time. At exactly 6.02am, the experiments recorded their last collisions (also known as 'events'). [14] UNIST has taken a major step toward laying the technical groundwork for developing next-generation high-intensity accelerators by providing a new advanced theoretical tool for the design and analysis of complex beam lines with strong coupling. [13] A targeted way to manipulate beams of protons accelerated using ultrashort and ultraintense laser pulses has been demonstrated by a team of researchers led at the University of Strathclyde. [12] The work elucidates the interplay between collective and single-particle excitations in nuclei and proposes a quantitative theoretical explanation. It has as such great potential to advance our understanding of nuclear structure. [11] When two protons approaching each other pass close enough together, they can " feel " each other, similar to the way that two magnets can be drawn closely together without necessarily sticking together. According to the Standard Model, at this grazing distance, the protons can produce a pair of W bosons. [10] The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists from France, Germany, and Hungary headed by Zoltán Fodor, a researcher from Wuppertal, has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. [9] Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Lattice QCD gives the same results as the diffraction patterns of the electromagnetic oscillators, explaining the color confinement and the asymptotic freedom of the Strong Interactions.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[14] viXra:1704.0231 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-18 21:06:23

Multifractal Analysis and the Dynamics of Effective Field Theories

Authors: Ervin Goldfain
Comments: 17 Pages.

We show that the flow from the ultraviolet to the infrared sector of any multidimensional nonlinear field theory approaches chaotic dynamics in a universal way. This result stems from several independent routes to aperiodic behavior and implies that the infrared attractor of effective field theories is likely to replicate the geometry of multifractal sets. In particular, we find that the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is characterized by a single generalized dimension (D = 4), while the Standard Model (SM) Lagrangian is defined by a triplet of generalized dimensions (D = 2, 3 and 4). On the one hand, this finding disfavors any naïve field-theoretic unification of SM and General Relativity (GR). On the other, it hints that the continuous spectrum of generalized dimensions lying between D = 2 and D = 4 may naturally account for the existence of non-baryonic Dark Matter.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[13] viXra:1704.0214 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-17 06:22:35

Puzzling Neutrino Shortfall

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

A puzzling neutrino shortfall seems to be due to faulty predictions, not a new particle. [12] Results from a new scientific study may shed light on a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called "reactor antineutrino anomaly," which has puzzled physicists since 2011. [11] Physicists have hypothesized the existence of fundamental particles called sterile neutrinos for decades and a couple of experiments have even caught possible hints of them. However, according to new results from two major international consortia, the chances that these indications were right and that these particles actually exist are now much slimmer. [10] The MIT team studied the distribution of neutrino flavors generated in Illinois, versus those detected in Minnesota, and found that these distributions can be explained most readily by quantum phenomena: As neutrinos sped between the reactor and detector, they were statistically most likely to be in a state of superposition, with no definite flavor or identity. [9] A new study reveals that neutrinos produced in the core of a supernova are highly localised compared to neutrinos from all other known sources. This result stems from a fresh estimate for an entity characterising these neutrinos, known as wave packets, which provide information on both their position and their momentum. [8] It could all have been so different. When matter first formed in the universe, our current theories suggest that it should have been accompanied by an equal amount of antimatter – a conclusion we know must be wrong, because we wouldn't be here if it were true. Now the latest results from a pair of experiments designed to study the behaviour of neutrinos – particles that barely interact with the rest of the universe – could mean we're starting to understand why. [7] In 2012, a tiny flash of light was detected deep beneath the Antarctic ice. A burst of neutrinos was responsible, and the flash of light was their calling card. It might not sound momentous, but the flash could give us tantalising insights into one of the most energetic objects in the distant universe. The light was triggered by the universe's most elusive particles when they made contact with a remarkable detector, appropriately called IceCube, which was built for the very purpose of capturing rare events such as this. [6]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[12] viXra:1704.0198 [pdf] replaced on 2017-04-16 08:24:29

The Origin and Formation Mechanism of Protons

Authors: Yibing Qiu
Comments: 1 Page.

Abstract: showing a viewpoint regards to the originand formation mechanism of protons.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[11] viXra:1704.0168 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-13 06:12:41

Rare Meson Decay

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

Many scientists working on the LHCb experiment at CERN had hoped that the exceptional accuracy in the measurement of the rare decay of the Bs0 meson would at last delineate the limits of the Standard Model, the current theory of the structure of matter, and reveal phenomena unknown to modern physics. [19] While no evidence for new physics has yet been found, these new results have provided crucial input to our theoretical models and has greatly improved our understanding of the Standard Model. [18] A quartet of researchers has boldly proposed the addition of six new particles to the standard model to explain five enduring problems. [17] Symmetry is the essential basis of nature, which gives rise to conservation laws. In comparison, the breaking of the symmetry is also indispensable for many phase transitions and nonreciprocal processes. Among various symmetry breaking phenomena, spontaneous symmetry breaking lies at the heart of many fascinating and fundamental properties of nature. [16] One of the biggest challenges in physics is to understand why everything we see in our universe seems to be formed only of matter, whereas the Big Bang should have created equal amounts of matter and antimatter. CERN's LHCb experiment is one of the best hopes for physicists looking to solve this longstanding mystery. [15] Imperial physicists have discovered how to create matter from light-a feat thought impossible when the idea was first theorized 80 years ago. [14] How can the LHC experiments prove that they have produced dark matter? They can't… not alone, anyway. [13] The race for the discovery of dark matter is on. Several experiments worldwide are searching for the mysterious substance and pushing the limits on the properties it may have. [12] Dark energy is a mysterious force that pervades all space, acting as a "push" to accelerate the universe's expansion. Despite being 70 percent of the universe, dark energy was only discovered in 1998 by two teams observing Type Ia supernovae. A Type 1a supernova is a cataclysmic explosion of a white dwarf star. The best way of measuring dark energy just got better, thanks to a new study of Type Ia supernovae. [11] Newly published research reveals that dark matter is being swallowed up by dark energy, offering novel insight into the nature of dark matter and dark energy and what the future of our Universe might be. [10] The gravitational force attracting the matter, causing concentration of the matter in a small space and leaving much space with low matter concentration: dark matter and energy. There is an asymmetry between the mass of the electric charges, for example proton and electron, can understood by the asymmetrical Planck Distribution Law. This temperature dependent energy distribution is asymmetric around the maximum intensity, where the annihilation of matter and antimatter is a high probability event. The asymmetric sides are creating different frequencies of electromagnetic radiations being in the same intensity level and compensating each other. One of these compensating ratios is the electron – proton mass ratio. The lower energy side has no compensating intensity level, it is the dark energy and the corresponding matter is the dark matter.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[10] viXra:1704.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-10 07:55:38

Rarest Radioactive Decay

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Why is there more matter than antimatter in the universe? The reason might be hidden in the neutrino nature: one of the preferred theoretical models assumes, that these elementary particles were identical with their own anti-particles. [12] Results from a new scientific study may shed light on a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called "reactor antineutrino anomaly," which has puzzled physicists since 2011. [11] Physicists have hypothesized the existence of fundamental particles called sterile neutrinos for decades and a couple of experiments have even caught possible hints of them. However, according to new results from two major international consortia, the chances that these indications were right and that these particles actually exist are now much slimmer. [10] The MIT team studied the distribution of neutrino flavors generated in Illinois, versus those detected in Minnesota, and found that these distributions can be explained most readily by quantum phenomena: As neutrinos sped between the reactor and detector, they were statistically most likely to be in a state of superposition, with no definite flavor or identity. [9] A new study reveals that neutrinos produced in the core of a supernova are highly localised compared to neutrinos from all other known sources. This result stems from a fresh estimate for an entity characterising these neutrinos, known as wave packets, which provide information on both their position and their momentum. [8] It could all have been so different. When matter first formed in the universe, our current theories suggest that it should have been accompanied by an equal amount of antimatter – a conclusion we know must be wrong, because we wouldn’t be here if it were true. Now the latest results from a pair of experiments designed to study the behaviour of neutrinos – particles that barely interact with the rest of the universe – could mean we’re starting to understand why. [7] In 2012, a tiny flash of light was detected deep beneath the Antarctic ice. A burst of neutrinos was responsible, and the flash of light was their calling card. It might not sound momentous, but the flash could give us tantalising insights into one of the most energetic objects in the distant universe. The light was triggered by the universe's most elusive particles when they made contact with a remarkable detector, appropriately called IceCube, which was built for the very purpose of capturing rare events such as this. [6] Neutrinos and their weird subatomic ways could help us understand high-energy particles, exploding stars and the origins of matter itself. [5] PHYSICS may be shifting to the right. Tantalizing signals at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland, hint at a new particle that could end 50 years of thinking that nature discriminates between left and right-handed particles. [4] The Weak Interaction transforms an electric charge in the diffraction pattern from one side to the other side, causing an electric dipole momentum change, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The Neutrino Oscillation of the Weak Interaction shows that it is a General electric dipole change and it is possible to any other temperature dependent entropy and information changing diffraction pattern of atoms, molecules and even complicated biological living structures.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[9] viXra:1704.0095 [pdf] replaced on 2017-05-18 09:43:27

Running of Electromagnetic and Strong Coupling Constants (Rev.2)

Authors: Dr Richard Wayte
Comments: 11 Pages.

The observed variation of the electromagnetic coupling constant  seen in high energy e+e- → e+e- collisions, has been explained in terms of work done compressing the energetic electron. A simple monotonic law has been found, which describes how the electron resists compression, without transmutation. Variation of the strong coupling constant αs has also been analysed in terms of equivalent work done by the gluon field within a proton’s component parts.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[8] viXra:1704.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-07 05:15:43

Understanding Di-Photons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

High-energy photon pairs at the Large Hadron Collider are famous for two things. First, as a clean decay channel of the Higgs boson. Second, for triggering some lively discussions in the scientific community in late 2015, when a modest excess above Standard Model predictions was observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. When the much larger 2016 dataset was analysed, however, no excess was observed. [29] In an article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg show, however, that under certain conditions, photons can strongly influence chemistry. [28] University of Otago physicists have found a way to control individual atoms, making them appear wherever they want them to. [27] New research shows that a scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes. [26] Physicists are getting a little bit closer to answering one of the oldest and most basic questions of quantum theory: does the quantum state represent reality or just our knowledge of reality? [25] A team of researchers led by LMU physics professor Immanuel Bloch has experimentally realized an exotic quantum system which is robust to mixing by periodic forces. [24] A group of scientists led by Johannes Fink from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) reported the first experimental observation of a first-order phase transition in a dissipative quantum system. [23] ORNL researchers have discovered a new type of quantum critical point, a new way in which materials change from one state of matter to another. [22] New research conducted at the University of Chicago has confirmed a decades-old theory describing the dynamics of continuous phase transitions. [21] No matter whether it is acoustic waves, quantum matter waves or optical waves of a laser—all kinds of waves can be in different states of oscillation, corresponding to different frequencies. Calculating these frequencies is part of the tools of the trade in theoretical physics. Recently, however, a special class of systems has caught the attention of the scientific community, forcing physicists to abandon well-established rules. [20]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[7] viXra:1704.0071 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-05 22:18:51

Structures of Electron, Neutron, and Proton and the Unification of Fundamental Forces

Authors: Benoît E. Prieur
Comments: 19 Pages.

While the Standard Model of physics is largely successful in explaining a wide variety of experimental results, it leaves some phenomena unexplained and falls short of being a complete theory of fundamental interactions. For example, it does not incorporate the full theory of general relativity, neither does it fully reconcile general relativity and quantum mechanics. In this context, here I present the fundamental particles of matter as geometrical forms of electromagnetic waves, whose size is directly linked to the wavelength. Thus, hadrons and leptons are considered as being composed of three and one intersecting waves, respectively. The particles’ spatiotemporal structures appear to explain their magnetic moments and spin. This model suggests that the weak force arises from electric and magnetic interactions between the substructures of neutron, the strong force from the close contact among the charges of nucleons, and the gravitational force from the curvature of space created by matter.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[6] viXra:1704.0070 [pdf] replaced on 2017-07-11 22:39:29

Zero. Probabilystic Foundation of Theoretyical Physics

Authors: Gunn Quznetsov
Comments: 60 Pages.

No need models - the fundamental theoretical physics is a part of classical probability theory (the part that considers the probability of dot events in the 3 + 1 space-time).
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[5] viXra:1704.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-05 09:18:59

Antineutrino Anomaly

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

Results from a new scientific study may shed light on a mismatch between predictions and recent measurements of ghostly particles streaming from nuclear reactors—the so-called "reactor antineutrino anomaly," which has puzzled physicists since 2011. [11] Physicists have hypothesized the existence of fundamental particles called sterile neutrinos for decades and a couple of experiments have even caught possible hints of them. However, according to new results from two major international consortia, the chances that these indications were right and that these particles actually exist are now much slimmer. [10] The MIT team studied the distribution of neutrino flavors generated in Illinois, versus those detected in Minnesota, and found that these distributions can be explained most readily by quantum phenomena: As neutrinos sped between the reactor and detector, they were statistically most likely to be in a state of superposition, with no definite flavor or identity. [9] A new study reveals that neutrinos produced in the core of a supernova are highly localised compared to neutrinos from all other known sources. This result stems from a fresh estimate for an entity characterising these neutrinos, known as wave packets, which provide information on both their position and their momentum. [8] It could all have been so different. When matter first formed in the universe, our current theories suggest that it should have been accompanied by an equal amount of antimatter – a conclusion we know must be wrong, because we wouldn't be here if it were true. Now the latest results from a pair of experiments designed to study the behaviour of neutrinos – particles that barely interact with the rest of the universe – could mean we're starting to understand why. [7] In 2012, a tiny flash of light was detected deep beneath the Antarctic ice. A burst of neutrinos was responsible, and the flash of light was their calling card. It might not sound momentous, but the flash could give us tantalising insights into one of the most energetic objects in the distant universe. The light was triggered by the universe's most elusive particles when they made contact with a remarkable detector, appropriately called IceCube, which was built for the very purpose of capturing rare events such as this. [6] Neutrinos and their weird subatomic ways could help us understand high-energy particles, exploding stars and the origins of matter itself. [5]
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[4] viXra:1704.0054 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-05 06:12:37

Leptonic Behavior of Constituents of Baryons.

Authors: Osvaldo F. Schilling
Comments: 11 Pages. two tables and one figure

The striking results that the same expression relating mass to the magnetic moment and to flux quantization applies to baryons and to leptons indicate that the theoretical interpretation of this finding must be the same for all these particles, with little ( or no) participation of other than electromagnetic( quantum) effects. The generation of leptons and baryons seems quantitatively associated to the excitation of “dressed” particles states with ( rest) energies describable in terms of interactions between “anomalous” magnetic moments and a self-magnetic field, as proposed by Barut in his theory for the muon.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[3] viXra:1704.0039 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-04 05:01:44

Supersymmetry and Standard Model

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

While no evidence for new physics has yet been found, these new results have provided crucial input to our theoretical models and has greatly improved our understanding of the Standard Model. [18] A quartet of researchers has boldly proposed the addition of six new particles to the standard model to explain five enduring problems. [17] Symmetry is the essential basis of nature, which gives rise to conservation laws. In comparison, the breaking of the symmetry is also indispensable for many phase transitions and nonreciprocal processes. Among various symmetry breaking phenomena, spontaneous symmetry breaking lies at the heart of many fascinating and fundamental properties of nature. [16] One of the biggest challenges in physics is to understand why everything we see in our universe seems to be formed only of matter, whereas the Big Bang should have created equal amounts of matter and antimatter. CERN's LHCb experiment is one of the best hopes for physicists looking to solve this longstanding mystery. [15] Imperial physicists have discovered how to create matter from light-a feat thought impossible when the idea was first theorized 80 years ago. [14] How can the LHC experiments prove that they have produced dark matter? They can't… not alone, anyway. [13] The race for the discovery of dark matter is on. Several experiments worldwide are searching for the mysterious substance and pushing the limits on the properties it may have. [12] Dark energy is a mysterious force that pervades all space, acting as a "push" to accelerate the universe's expansion. Despite being 70 percent of the universe, dark energy was only discovered in 1998 by two teams observing Type Ia supernovae. A Type 1a supernova is a cataclysmic explosion of a white dwarf star. The best way of measuring dark energy just got better, thanks to a new study of Type Ia supernovae. [11] Newly published research reveals that dark matter is being swallowed up by dark energy, offering novel insight into the nature of dark matter and dark energy and what the future of our Universe might be. [10] The gravitational force attracting the matter, causing concentration of the matter in a small space and leaving much space with low matter concentration: dark matter and energy. There is an asymmetry between the mass of the electric charges, for example proton and electron, can understood by the asymmetrical Planck Distribution Law. This temperature dependent energy distribution is asymmetric around the maximum intensity, where the annihilation of matter and antimatter is a high probability event. The asymmetric sides are creating different frequencies of electromagnetic radiations being in the same intensity level and compensating each other. One of these compensating ratios is the electron – proton mass ratio. The lower energy side has no compensating intensity level, it is the dark energy and the corresponding matter is the dark matter.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[2] viXra:1704.0037 [pdf] replaced on 2017-05-18 04:52:02

Preons, Standard Model, Gravity with Torsion and Black Holes

Authors: Risto Raitio
Comments: 13 Pages. Published in Open Access Library Journal, 4: e3632. Includes viXra:1703.0247.

A previous spin 1/2 preon model for the substructure of the the standard model quarks and leptons is complemented to provide particle classification group, preon interactions and a tentative model of black holes. The goal of this study is to analyze a phenomenological theory of all interactions. A minimal amount of physical assumptions are made and only experimentally verified global and gauge groups are employed: SLq(2), the three of the standard model and the full Poincar\'e group. Gravity theory with torsion is introduced producing an axial-vector field coupled to preons. The mass of the axial-vector particle is estimated to be near the GUT scale. The boson can materialize above this scale and gain further mass to become a black hole at Planck mass while massless preons may form the horizon. A particle-black hole duality is proposed.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[1] viXra:1704.0001 [pdf] submitted on 2017-04-01 01:23:59

Foundations of Gauge Theology

Authors: Edoardo Carlesi
Comments: 4 Pages.

This paper shows how to quantize Roman Catholicism in order to solve the fine tuning-problems of Classical Theology. This procedure is used to define a new theory, which is called Gauge Theology, that shares a large number of striking similarities with the Standard Model of particle physics. We argue that the existence of these common features cannot be attributed to sheer coincidence, but is rather a sign of the miraculous properties of the theory.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics