High Energy Particle Physics

0910 Submissions

[7] viXra:0910.0051 [pdf] submitted on 27 Oct 2009

Derivation of Gauge Boson Masses from the Dynamics of Levy Flows

Authors: Ervin Goldfain
Comments: 7 pages, Published in Nonlinear Phenomena in Complex Systems 8:4 (2005), 366-372.

Gauge bosons are fundamental fields that mediate the electroweak interaction of leptons and quarks. The underlying mechanism explaining how gauge bosons acquire mass is neither definitively settled nor universally accepted and several competing theories coexist. The prevailing paradigm is that boson masses arise as a result of coupling to a hypothetical scalar field called the Higgs boson. Within the current range of accelerator technology, compelling evidence for the Higgs boson is missing. We discuss in this paper a derivation of boson masses that bypasses the Higgs mechanism and is formulated on the basis of complexity theory. The key premise of our work is that the dynamics of the gauge field may be described as a stochastic process caused by the short range of electroweak interaction. It is found that, if this process is driven by Levy statistics, mass generation in the electroweak sector can be naturally accounted for. Theoretical predictions are shown to agree well with experimental data.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[6] viXra:0910.0045 [pdf] replaced on 2012-12-20 13:48:03

The Half-Life of Proton Decay and the "Heat Death" of the Cosmos

Authors: John A. Gowan
Comments: 13 Pages.

The significance of proton decay is that it is the end-point of time and temporal entropy for matter, in much the same way we might say the black hole is the end-point of space and spatial entropy for light. Again we find that "the extremes meet": proton decay is surely commonplace inside black holes, while Hawking's "quantum radiance" returns bound energy to free energy and temporal entropy to spatial entropy. The notion that the ratio of force strengths relates the "heat death" and the "information death" of the Cosmos via proton decay suggests that if we knew one we would know the other; unfortunately, we know neither, and our force ratio is a pure number, without units. Nevertheless, I will use it to make a naive guess at the proton's lifetime. The lower experimental bound on proton decay is currently 10(35) years. According to the hypothesis advanced here, that the proton lifetime reflects the force ratio, in 2.5 x 10(41) seconds all protons will have decayed, which, curiously enough, yields an observational expectation (8 x 10(33) years) not far off the current lower experimental bound.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[5] viXra:0910.0042 [pdf] submitted on 21 Oct 2009

Chaotic Dynamics of the Renormalization Group Flow and Standard Model Parameters

Authors: Ervin Goldfain
Comments: 11 pages, Published in Intl. Journal for Nonlinear Science 3 (2007), 170-180

Bringing closure to the host of open questions posed by the current Standard Model for particle physics (SM) continues to be a major challenge for theoretical physics community. Motivated by recent advances in the study of complex systems, our work suggests that the pattern of particle masses and gauge couplings emerges from the critical dynamics of renormalization group equations. Using the ε-expansion method along with the universal path to chaos in unimodal maps, we find that the observed hierarchies of SM parameters amount to a series of scaling ratios depending on the Feigenbaum constant.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[4] viXra:0910.0034 [pdf] replaced on 2012-05-04 19:17:42

The Strong Force: Two Expressions

Authors: John A. Gowan
Comments: 7 Pages.

The exact origin of the strong force (holding compound atomic nuclei together) is not yet a completely settled matter. Some authors (Robert Oerter) attribute this force to the exchange of virtual mesons between protons and neutrons (as in the original theory of Yukawa), while others (Frank Close) claim this old model has been superseded by the modern theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and attribute the binding of nucleons to a magnetic analog of the color charge, originating in the exchange of gluons between quarks (theory of Gell-Mann). Still others (Nicholas Mee), think both gluons and mesons play a role. My own view is that the original Yukawa model is correct, but the reader will have to make his own choice, and realize that not all experts would agree with me (or each other). My reasons for preferring the original Yukawa model are several: 1) Yukawa's mathematics work, correctly predicting the mass of the exchanged mesons. If we deny the validity of this model, what are we to do with this mathematical structure and these mesons? 2) If the color-magnetism theory is correct, then all proton-neutron combinations should be equivalent, whereas we know that some are favored - the alpha particle, for example, and all combinations of even numbers of nucleons. There are also "magic numbers" of nucleons, combinations of special stability among the heavier nuclei. Finally, why do we not find isolated neutron-neutron pairings? The pion exchange model answers all these questions. 3) Because mesons carry both flavor and color charges, it is also possible that both effects are at work simultaneously (after all, gluons do attract each other, so if nucleons are sufficiently closely packed, there might be gluon-gluon attraction between nucleons as well as within nucleons). Mesons carry color-anticolor charges (always of the same color), so they can neatly substitute themselves for the color charge of a baryon's quark. Because they also carry flavor/anti-flavor charges (in this case not necessarily of the same flavor: d and anti- u, for example), they can just as neatly change a baryon's "u" quark into a "d" quark (and hence a proton into a neutron), or vice versa. A "magnetic" color effect, however, could not by itself change a quark's flavor. The exchange of mesons allows the neutron to satisfy its natural tendency to undergo beta decay via a virtual reaction rather than an actual decay. 4) A true magnetic analog of the color charge is expressed as "asymptotic freedom" - the increasing freedom of movement of the quarks as they approach each other at the center of the baryon. Hence this is an inwardly directed "magnetic" effect, typical of the strong force, not a likely source of binding energy beyond the confines of the baryon. The symmetry-keeping role of the color charge is to permanently confine the fractional charges of the quarks to whole quantum charge units. While "asymptotic freedom" is completely understandable within this conservation context as a "local gauge symmetry" effect, the external binding of other baryons is not.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[3] viXra:0910.0022 [pdf] replaced on 2012-12-02 18:40:22

The Higgs Boson and the Weak Force IVBs: Part I

Authors: John A. Gowan
Comments: 9 Pages. original paper revised and split into three parts

There is a very good reason why the field vectors of the weak force involve the hugely massive Intermediate Vector Bosons (IVBs) and the associated Higgs boson (while the field vectors of the other forces, the photon, gluon, and graviton, are massless energy forms): the weak force is the only force that creates and/or transforms "singlet" elementary particles (single elementary particles without antimatter partners). Single elementary particles cannot be directly produced from the vacuum "zoo" of virtual (and symmetric) particle-antiparticle pairs, as in the case of electromagnetic or strong force particle-pair production (in collisions, for example). Hence some other mechanism for reproducing the original and invariant conserved parameters of single elementary particles must be employed. Single elementary particles created today must be the same in all respects as those created eons ago during the "Big Bang", and the massive and elaborate mechanism of the weak force is the only way to accomplish this imperative of energy and symmetry conservation - the invariance of the mass of all elementary particles, wherever and whenever they may be created. It is also for this reason that the whole weak force transformation mechanism is quantized in terms of the invariant Higgs boson and IVB mass. The large mass of the Higgs and IVBs actually recreates the energy-density of the primordial environment in which the elementary particles whose transformations they now mediate were originally created. A weak force transformation is in effect a "mimi-Big Bang", reproducing locally the conditions of the global "macro-Big Bang", so that the elementary particles produced by each are the same in every respect. This is the only way such a replication could be accomplished after eons of entropic evolution by the Cosmos (because the mass of the Higgs and IVBs (or of particles generally) is not enervated by the entropic expansion, spatial or historic, of the Cosmos. This is the fundamental reason why the weak force transformation mechanism employs massive bosons). The role of the Higgs is to select and gauge the appropriate unified-force symmetric energy-density state (usually the electroweak (EW) force-unification energy level) for the transformation at hand; IVBs appropriate for that particular symmetric energy state (the "W" family of IVBs in the electroweak case) then access (energize) the state and perform the requisite transformation. (See: "The 'W' IVB and the Weak Force Mechanism".)
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[2] viXra:0910.0009 [pdf] replaced on 16 Oct 2010

Chaos in Quantum Chromodynamics and the Hadron Spectrum

Authors: Ervin Goldfain
Comments: 10 pages, Published in the Electronic Journal of Theoretical Physics, EJTP 7, No. 23 (2010) 7584.

We present analytic evidence that the distribution of hadron masses follows from the universal transition to chaos in non-equilibrium field theory. It is shown that meson and baryon spectra obey a scaling hierarchy with critical exponents ordered in natural progression. Numerical predictions are found to be in close agreement with experimental data.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics

[1] viXra:0910.0005 [pdf] replaced on 3 Nov 2010

Complex Dynamics and the Future of Particle Physics

Authors: Ervin Goldfain
Comments: 4 pages, Paper published in Nonl. Sci. Lett. A, vol.1, No.1, 39-42, 2010.

In this report we argue that complex dynamics has the potential of becoming a key tool for the "new physics" sector of particle theory. The report includes a list of candidate signals for "new physics" that were recently recorded above the scale of electroweak interaction. Some of the pioneering efforts directed towards application of complex dynamics in high-energy physics are briefly surveyed.
Category: High Energy Particle Physics