Condensed Matter

1909 Submissions

[45] viXra:1909.0400 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-20 05:14:20

Topological Phases of Optical Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

A new study published in Nature Communications describes how optical reciprocity can be broken using insights from topological physics. [26] Topology is a global aspect of materials, leading to fundamental new properties for compounds with large relativistic effects. [25] Weyl fermions are novel particles that were predicted to be seen in high-energy physics experiments but have not been observed. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16]
Category: Condensed Matter

[44] viXra:1909.0358 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-16 07:17:55

Synthesis of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

A team of scientists from Ural Federal University (Yekaterinburg), Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology and other collaborator have published an article about a new method for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. [53] A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. [52] Valencia University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. [51] Scientists who study the nanoscale-with molecules and materials 10,000 smaller than a pinhead-need to be able to test the way that some molecules twist, known as their chirality, because mirror image molecules with the same structure can have very different properties. [50] In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44]
Category: Condensed Matter

[43] viXra:1909.0357 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-16 07:46:01

Sound and Light Waves in Silicon Chips

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

One potential application of such devices is in future cellular networks, widely known as 5G. Digital electronics alone might not be enough to support the signal processing requirements in such networks. Light and sound devices might do the trick. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Condensed Matter

[42] viXra:1909.0355 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-16 08:08:41

Nanoswing Overcomes Thermal Fluctuations

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Physicists at AMOLF have managed to cool a swinging, nanosized string to near-zero temperature without using external refrigeration. [35] One potential application of such devices is in future cellular networks, widely known as 5G. Digital electronics alone might not be enough to support the signal processing requirements in such networks. Light and sound devices might do the trick. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33] A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26]
Category: Condensed Matter

[41] viXra:1909.0354 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-16 08:22:44

Stability of Highly Energetic Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Understanding the physical and chemical characteristics of energetic materials under extreme conditions is crucial for their safe and efficient use. [36] Physicists at AMOLF have managed to cool a swinging, nanosized string to near-zero temperature without using external refrigeration. [35] One potential application of such devices is in future cellular networks, widely known as 5G. Digital electronics alone might not be enough to support the signal processing requirements in such networks. Light and sound devices might do the trick. [34] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). [33]
Category: Condensed Matter

[40] viXra:1909.0333 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-17 04:53:33

The Effects of Copper Doping on Photocatalytic Activity at (101) Planes of Anatase Tio2: a Theoretical Study

Authors: Dorian Hanaor
Comments: 12 Pages. English, authors post-peer-review version

Copper dopants are varyingly reported to enhance photocatalytic activity at titanium dioxide surfaces through uncertain mechanisms. In order to interpret how copper doping might alter the performance of titanium dioxide photocatalysts in aqueous media we applied density functional theory methods to simulate surface units of doped anatase (101) planes. By including van der Waals interactions, we consider the energetics of adsorbed water at anatase surfaces in pristine and copper doped systems. Simulation results indicate that copper dopant at anatase (101) surfaces is most stable in a 2+ oxidation state and a disperse configuration, suggesting the formation of secondary CuO phases is energetically unfavourable. In agreement with previous reports, water at the studied surface is predicted to exhibit molecular adsorption with this tendency slightly enhanced by copper. Results imply that the enhancement of photoactivity at anatase surfaces through Cu doping is more likely to arise from electronic interactions mediated by charge transfer and inter-bandgap states increasing photoexcitation and extending surface-hole lifetimes rather than through the increased density of adsorbed hydroxyl groups.
Category: Condensed Matter

[39] viXra:1909.0332 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-15 07:36:48

Conductivity Edges of Graphene

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

The conductivity of dual layers of graphene greatly depends on the states of carbon atoms at their edges; a property which could have important implications for information transmissions on quantum scales. [42] A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged "edge conduction" in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2-D topological insulator and quantum material. [41]
Category: Condensed Matter

[38] viXra:1909.0331 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-15 07:56:32

Simulation of Peeling Graphene Sheets

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Here, Ryoji Okamoto, Koki Yamasaki, and Naruo Sasaki at The University of Electro-Communications have developed a time-saving potential model to simulate the adhesive characteristics during the peeling process of armchair-type graphene sheets from frictionless graphite substrate surfaces. [43] The conductivity of dual layers of graphene greatly depends on the states of carbon atoms at their edges; a property which could have important implications for information transmissions on quantum scales. [42] A research team comprised of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, and the University of Washington has for the first time directly imaged "edge conduction" in monolayer tungsten ditelluride, or WTe2, a newly discovered 2-D topological insulator and quantum material. [41]
Category: Condensed Matter

[37] viXra:1909.0310 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-14 07:44:39

Twisted and Untwisted Nanomaterial

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

Scientists who study the nanoscale—with molecules and materials 10,000 smaller than a pinhead—need to be able to test the way that some molecules twist, known as their chirality, because mirror image molecules with the same structure can have very different properties. [50] In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48]
Category: Condensed Matter

[36] viXra:1909.0309 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-14 07:59:34

Progress in Inverse Photoconductance

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 76 Pages.

University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. [51] Scientists who study the nanoscale-with molecules and materials 10,000 smaller than a pinhead-need to be able to test the way that some molecules twist, known as their chirality, because mirror image molecules with the same structure can have very different properties. [50] In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Condensed Matter

[35] viXra:1909.0308 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-14 08:17:11

Gem-Like Nanoparticles as Catalysts

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 79 Pages.

A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. [52] Valencia University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. [51] Scientists who study the nanoscale-with molecules and materials 10,000 smaller than a pinhead-need to be able to test the way that some molecules twist, known as their chirality, because mirror image molecules with the same structure can have very different properties. [50] In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43]
Category: Condensed Matter

[34] viXra:1909.0307 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-14 08:38:25

Blackest Black Material Development

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 81 Pages.

MIT engineers report today that they have cooked up a material that is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported. [53] A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. [52] Valencia University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. [51] Scientists who study the nanoscale—with molecules and materials 10,000 smaller than a pinhead—need to be able to test the way that some molecules twist, known as their chirality, because mirror image molecules with the same structure can have very different properties. [50]
Category: Condensed Matter

[33] viXra:1909.0298 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-15 01:53:43

Fluid's Resonance Frequencies

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

Lyon has recently collected the first measurements of the resonance frequencies of a stable torus of fluid. [43] Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. [42] The properties of gold in nanoscale are significantly different to those of bulk gold. Of special interest are gold nanoclusters, that are composed of between tens to some hundreds of gold atoms. [41] A team at Osaka University has created single-molecule nanowires, complete with an insulation layer, up to 10 nanometers in length. [40] Using optical and electrical measurements, a two-dimensional anisotropic crystal of rhenium disulfide was found to show opposite piezoresistant effects along two principle axes, i.e. positive along one axis and negative along another. [39] A team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has demonstrated a new aqueous polymerization procedure for generating polymer nanoparticles with a single chain and uniform shape, which, by contrast to previous methods, involves high particle concentrations. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects-by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36] Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. [35] For years, researchers have been trying to find ways to grow an optimal nanowire, using crystals with perfectly aligned layers all along the wire. [34]
Category: Condensed Matter

[32] viXra:1909.0278 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-14 03:55:08

Laser-Cooled Optical Tweezer Array

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. [32] "With optical tweezers, you can capture a single particle in its native state in solution and watch its structural evolution," said Linda Young, Argonne distinguished fellow. [31] The optical tweezer is revealing new capabilities while helping scientists understand quantum mechanics, the theory that explains nature in terms of subatomic particles. [30] In the perspective, Gabor and Song collect early examples in electron metamaterials and distil emerging design strategies for electronic control from them. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22]
Category: Condensed Matter

[31] viXra:1909.0270 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-12 11:03:25

Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43] Bioengineers and biophysicists from the have discovered that the toxicity of nanoparticles depends more on their size and the extent to which their surface area is charged than on their chemical composition. [42] That's now possible thanks to research by Rice University scientists who used the light-emitting properties of particular molecules to create a fluorescent nano-thermometer. [41]
Category: Condensed Matter

[30] viXra:1909.0269 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-12 11:21:00

Cooper Spintronic Component

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 76 Pages.

This area of research aims to greatly accelerate the study of spintronics with organic molecules. [50] In a recent study, researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center have demonstrated that nanoscale vacuum channel transistors can be fabricated on silicon carbide wafers. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47]
Category: Condensed Matter

[29] viXra:1909.0260 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 07:10:24

Smart Skin Changes Color

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

The journal ACS Nano is publishing research led by chemists at Emory University that found a solution to the problem. [41] Scientists at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian and international colleagues developed the concept for constructing an "optical vacuum cleaner." [40] Researchers at Nanjing University in China have now made the first nanopore sensor that works optically and does not require any electrical connections. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37] More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30]
Category: Condensed Matter

[28] viXra:1909.0246 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-10 11:38:21

Friction Leads to Static Electricity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 28 Pages.

Now a Northwestern University team developed a new model that shows that rubbing two objects together produces static electricity, or triboelectricity, by bending the tiny protrusions on the surface of materials. [22] UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow. [21] Two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors are promising for quantum computing and future electronics. Now, researchers can convert metallic gold into semiconductor and customize the material atom-by-atom on boron nitride nanotubes. [20] U.S. Naval Research Laboratory scientists have developed and patented the fabrication of transparent, luminescent material they say could give smartphone and television screens flexible, stretchable, and shatterproof properties. [19] "Digital quantum simulation is thus intrinsically much more robust than what one might expect from known error bounds on the global many-body wave function," Heyl says. [18] A new finding by researchers at the University of Chicago promises to improve the speed and reliability of current and next generation quantum computers by as much as ten times. [17] Ph. D candidate Shuntaro Okada and information scientist Masayuki Ohzeki of Japan's Tohoku University collaborated with global automotive components manufacturer Denso Corporation and other colleagues to develop an algorithm that improves the D-Wave quantum annealer's ability to solve combinatorial optimization problems. [16] D-Wave Systems today published a milestone study demonstrating a topological phase transition using its 2048-qubit annealing quantum computer. [15] New quantum theory research, led by academics at the University of St Andrews' School of Physics, could transform the way scientists predict how quantum particles behave. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. [13] To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12]
Category: Condensed Matter

[27] viXra:1909.0226 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 01:08:53

Electrode Free Nanopore Sensing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

Researchers at Nanjing University in China have now made the first nanopore sensor that works optically and does not require any electrical connections. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37] More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28]
Category: Condensed Matter

[26] viXra:1909.0225 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 01:27:48

Waves with Metamaterials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

For Jordan Raney, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, cutting-edge science sometimes involves whacking a rubber disc with a hammer. [40] Researchers at Nanjing University in China have now made the first nanopore sensor that works optically and does not require any electrical connections. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37] More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29]
Category: Condensed Matter

[25] viXra:1909.0219 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-11 04:43:05

Optical Vacuum Cleaner Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

Scientists at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian and international colleagues developed the concept for constructing an "optical vacuum cleaner." [40] Researchers at Nanjing University in China have now made the first nanopore sensor that works optically and does not require any electrical connections. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37] More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29]
Category: Condensed Matter

[24] viXra:1909.0214 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 08:07:35

High-Entropy Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 49 Pages.

The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30]
Category: Condensed Matter

[23] viXra:1909.0213 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-09 08:22:42

Gold Cluster Chops Carbon Dioxide

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

A doctoral dissertation from University of Jyvaskyla, Finland, shows successful computer simulations that were able to predict the atom-precise structure of a cluster comprising 11 gold atoms. [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids-a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation-capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Condensed Matter

[22] viXra:1909.0199 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-10 00:53:25

New Material for Data Processing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

The material was discovered by an international research team in cooperation with Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30]
Category: Condensed Matter

[21] viXra:1909.0198 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-10 01:02:29

Controlling Crystals of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Optical microresonators convert laser light into ultrashort pulses travelling around the resonator's circumference. [34] The material was discovered by an international research team in cooperation with Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31]
Category: Condensed Matter

[20] viXra:1909.0197 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-10 01:11:18

Historical Claims to Test

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

The latest analytical techniques available to scientists can confirm the validity of historical sources in some cases, and suggest a need for reconsideration in others. [35] Optical microresonators convert laser light into ultrashort pulses travelling around the resonator's circumference. [34] The material was discovered by an international research team in cooperation with Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). [33] The high-entropy alloy nanoparticles are believed to have great potential for catalytic applications. [32] Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31]
Category: Condensed Matter

[19] viXra:1909.0188 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 06:50:08

Nanowires Newton's Glass Prism

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Scientists have designed an ultra-miniaturised device that could directly image single cells without the need for a microscope or make chemical fingerprint analysis possible from a smartphone. [31] Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. [30] A new form of electron microscopy allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids—a first in the field. [29] A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation—capturing how the atomsrearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time). [28]
Category: Condensed Matter

[18] viXra:1909.0187 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 07:16:41

Platinum Fuel Cell Catalysts

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

Platinum has long been used as a catalyst to enable the oxidation reduction reaction at the center of fuel cell technology. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43] Bioengineers and biophysicists from the have discovered that the toxicity of nanoparticles depends more on their size and the extent to which their surface area is charged than on their chemical composition. [42] That's now possible thanks to research by Rice University scientists who used the light-emitting properties of particular molecules to create a fluorescent nano-thermometer. [41]
Category: Condensed Matter

[17] viXra:1909.0186 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 07:32:44

Origami Structures out of Graphene

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 75 Pages.

A team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Vanderbilt University and the University of Maryland has created origami-like structures made out of graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group explains how they achieved this feat and possible applications. [50] Platinum has long been used as a catalyst to enable the oxidation reduction reaction at the center of fuel cell technology. [49] Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanofibers can have various applications, such as in catalyzers and filters. [48] Today, scientists report progress in making versions of these nanoparticles that could someday give built-in night vision to humans. [47] A new piece of a difficult puzzle-the nature of memory-fell into place this week with a hint at how brain cells change structure when they learn something. [46] Researchers at the University of Alberta have found an important protein in the cells of a deadly infectious parasite, opening the door to less harmful treatment for millions of people suffering from diseases like sleeping sickness in Africa and Chagas disease in South America. [45] The remarkable ability of a small Australian sea snail to produce a colourful purple compound to protect its eggs is proving even more remarkable for its potential in a new anti-cancer pharmaceutical. [44] Gene editing technology is a technology that eliminates the underlying causes of and treats diseases by removing specific genesor editing genes to restore their normal function. In particular, CRISPR gene editing technology is now commonly used for immunotherapy by correcting the genes of immune cells to induce them to attack cancer cells selectively. [43] Bioengineers and biophysicists from the have discovered that the toxicity of nanoparticles depends more on their size and the extent to which their surface area is charged than on their chemical composition. [42]
Category: Condensed Matter

[16] viXra:1909.0182 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 10:20:34

Nanoparticles Neutron Experiment

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Since neutrons interact strongly with deuterium (heavy hydrogen), the researchers used a deuterated electrolyte in the battery cell to make both the solid products (sulphur and lithium sulphide) visible. [20] Researchers in Madrid, Spain, have now observed the quantization of electron energy levels in copper similar to the effects of confinement within a nanostructure, but in a copper sample with no nanoscale dimensions in the plane of the observed effects. [19] This method, called atomic spin squeezing, works by redistributing the uncertainty unevenly between two components of spin in these measurements systems, which operate at the quantum scale. [18] Researchers from the University of Cambridge have taken a peek into the secretive domain of quantum mechanics. [17] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity-spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Condensed Matter

[15] viXra:1909.0162 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 07:47:06

Optical Ruler Measure to Nanoscale

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Mathematical Sciences describes a new optical method that can measure displacements of a nanometer-the smallest distance ever directly measured, using near infrared light. [32] Compact quantum devices could be incorporated into laptops and mobile phones, thanks in part to small devices called quantum optical micro-combs. [31] Taking their name from an intricate Japanese basket pattern, kagome magnets are thought to have electronic properties that could be valuable for future quantum devices and applications. [30] A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can operate as a quantum memory device. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21]
Category: Condensed Matter

[14] viXra:1909.0161 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 08:12:13

Revolutionary Optical Material

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

An international team of researchers has reported a new way to safeguard drones, surveillance cameras and other equipment against laser attacks, which can disable or destroy the equipment. The capability is known as optical limiting. [33] However, a discovery published in the journal Science by Professor Nikolay Zheludev and Dr. Guanghui Yuan at NTU's School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences describes a new optical method that can measure displacements of a nanometer-the smallest distance ever directly measured, using near infrared light. [32] Compact quantum devices could be incorporated into laptops and mobile phones, thanks in part to small devices called quantum optical micro-combs. [31] Taking their name from an intricate Japanese basket pattern, kagome magnets are thought to have electronic properties that could be valuable for future quantum devices and applications. [30] A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can operate as a quantum memory device. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing,
Category: Condensed Matter

[13] viXra:1909.0158 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 09:28:56

Opportunities from Nanoparticles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

Ross joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) faculty last year, moving from the nanoscale materials analysis department at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. "I learned a tremendous amount from my IBM colleagues and hope to extend our research in material design and growth in new directions," she says. [34] Another collaborative project from a nanoparticles expert at The University of Texas at Arlington has yielded promising results in the search for more effective, targeted cancer treatments. [33]
Category: Condensed Matter

[12] viXra:1909.0147 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-08 05:00:09

Silicon Carbide Semiconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

Physicists of the University of Basel, the Paul Scherrer Institute and ABB explain what prevents the use of this combination of silicon and carbon in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters. [30] A potentially useful material for building quantum computers has been unearthed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), whose scientists have found a superconductor that could sidestep one of the primary obstacles standing in the way of effective quantum logic circuits. [29] Important challenges in creating practical quantum computers have been addressed by two independent teams of physicists in the US. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Condensed Matter

[11] viXra:1909.0127 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 01:14:52

Measuring Changes in Magnetic Order

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

A possible way of surpassing traditional electronics is through the use of antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. [50] Stephen Wilson, a professor of materials in UC Santa Barbara's College of Engineering, works in that "long before" realm, seeking to create new materials that exhibit desirable new states. [49] A phenomenon that is well known from chaos theory was observed in a material for the first time ever, by scientists from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. [48] Plasmonic nanostructures have been widely used for enhancing light-matter interactions due to the strong local field enhancement in deep subwavelength volumes. [47]
Category: Condensed Matter

[10] viXra:1909.0122 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 03:21:37

Room-Temperature Skyrmions

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Researchers have succeeded in stabilizing antiferromagnetic skyrmions in an ordinary material system at room temperature for the first time. [32] Unique physical properties of these "magic knots" might help to satisfy demand for IT power and storage using a fraction of the energy. [31] A skyrmion is the magnetic version of a tornado which is obtained by replacing the air parcels that make up the tornado by magnetic spins, and by scaling the system down to the nanometre scale. [30] A new material created by Oregon State University researchers is a key step toward the next generation of supercomputers. [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures-coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule-occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors-sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Condensed Matter

[9] viXra:1909.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-07 04:10:41

Brighter LED Future

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 83 Pages.

In June, NIST began offering a faster, more accurate and less labor-intensive calibration service for assessing the brightness of LED lamps and other solid-state lighting products. [51] A possible way of surpassing traditional electronics is through the use of antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials. [50] Stephen Wilson, a professor of materials in UC Santa Barbara's College of Engineering, works in that "long before" realm, seeking to create new materials that exhibit desirable new states. [49] A phenomenon that is well known from chaos theory was observed in a material for the first time ever, by scientists from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. [48]
Category: Condensed Matter

[8] viXra:1909.0109 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-05 13:28:10

Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (Atr-Ftir) Spectroscopy Study of the Nano Molecule C 13 H 20 Beli 2 Sesi Using ab Initio and Hartree-Fock Methods in the Basis Set RHF/CC-PVTZ and RHF/6-311G** (3df, 3pd): an Experimental Challenge to

Authors: Ricardo Gobat, Marcia Regina Risso Gobato, Alireza Heidari
Comments: 26 Pages. Chemistry Reports , 1-26, 2019. DOI: 10.26524/cr1911

The work characterizes the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy of the nano molecule C13H20BeLi2SeSi. Calculations obtained in the ab initio restrict Hartree-Fock method, on basis set was used to indicate that the simulated molecule C13H20BeLi2SeSi features the structure polar-apolar-polar predominant. The basis set which was used that includes RHF/CC-pVTZ and RHF/6-311G** (3df, 3pd). In the RHF/CC-pVTZ basis set, charge density in relation to RHF/6-311G** (3df, 3pd) is 50% lower. The length of the molecule C13H20BeLi2SeSi is f 15.799 (Å). The ATR-FTIR spectrum was calculated for indicating the characteristic of the nano molecule and their frequency (cm-1) were obtained in the basis set was used. The highest for ATR-FTIR scattering activities peaks are in the frequency 3.348 (cm-1) with 7.107609729 (Å4/amu) and 2.163 (cm-1) with 8.902805583 (Å4/amu) for RHF/CC-pVTZ and RHF/6-311G** (3df, 3pd), respectively. As the bio-inorganic molecule C13H20BeLi2SeSi is the basis set for a new creation of a biomembrane, later calculations that challenge the current concepts of biomembrane should advance to such a purpose.
Category: Condensed Matter

[7] viXra:1909.0108 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-05 13:33:51

New Nano-Molecule Kurumi and Raman Spectroscopy Using ab Initio, Hartree-Fock Method

Authors: Ricardo Gobato
Comments: 6 Pages. Ricardo Gobato. New Nano-Molecule Kurumi and Raman Spectroscopy using ab initio, Hartree-Fock Method. Am J Biomed Sci & Res. 2019 - 2(4). AJBSR.MS.ID.000594. DOI: 10.34297/AJBSR.2019.02.000594

btained in the methods Restrict Hartree-Fock of thfirst principles (ab initio), on the set of basis used indicate that the simulated molecule C 13 H 20 BeLi 2 SeSi/C 13 H 19 BeLi2SeSi features the structure polar-apolar-polar predominant. The set of basis used that have are correlation consistent polarized Triple-zeta (CC-pVTZ) and Pople’s basis sets six gaussian functions in the shell, three double zeta Gaussian functions, Slater type orbitals with polarization function (6-311G** (3df, 3pd)). In the CC-pVTZ base set, the charge density in relation to 6-311G** (3df, 3pd) is 50% lower. The length of the molecule C13H 20BeLi2SeSi is of 15.799Å. The Raman spectrum was calculated indicating the characteristic of the nano-molecule and their frequency (cm-1) were obtained in the set of bases used. The highest for Raman scattering activities peaks are in the frequency 3,348cm-1 with 7.107609729 Å4/amu and 2,163 cm-1 with 8.902805583 Å4/amu, for CC-pVTZ and 6-311G** (3df, 3pd), respectively. As the bio-inorganic molecule C13H20BeLi2SeSi is the basis for a new creation of a biomembrane, later calculations that challenge the current concepts of biomembrane shouldadvance to such a purpose. The new nano-molecule Kurumi is well characterize computationally. As its scientific name 3-lithio-3-(6-{3-selena-8-beryllatricyclo [3.2.1.0²,⁴] oct-6-en-2-yl} hexyl) -1-sila-2-lithacyclopropane
Category: Condensed Matter

[6] viXra:1909.0007 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 04:06:59

Metal Oxide Frameworks

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Metal oxide frameworks, or MOFs, are solid materials which can behave like ultra-fine sponges. The cavities in the sponge are of nanosize—about the size of individual molecules. [27] Now researchers in France reckon they have finally found convincing evidence for the transformation, having built new devices for pressurizing and observing tiny samples of hydrogen. [26] The phenomenon of metastability, in which a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy, is widely observed in nature and technology. [25]
Category: Condensed Matter

[5] viXra:1909.0006 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 04:32:02

Cosmetics with Microfluidic Devices

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful. [28] Metal oxide frameworks, or MOFs, are solid materials which can behave like ultra-fine sponges. The cavities in the sponge are of nanosize—about the size of individual molecules. [27] Now researchers in France reckon they have finally found convincing evidence for the transformation, having built new devices for pressurizing and observing tiny samples of hydrogen. [26]
Category: Condensed Matter

[4] viXra:1909.0005 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 04:45:53

Nanoscale Light Manipulation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Human pathogens, such as HIV and viruses causing respiratory tract infection, have molecular fingerprints that are difficult to distinguish. To better detect these pathogens, sensors in diagnostic tools need to manipulate light on a nanoscale. [29] Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful. [28] Metal oxide frameworks, or MOFs, are solid materials which can behave like ultra-fine sponges. The cavities in the sponge are of nanosize—about the size of individual molecules. [27]
Category: Condensed Matter

[3] viXra:1909.0004 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 04:59:15

Hi-Res Patterning Advance Microelectronics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

To increase the processing speed and reduce the power consumption of electronic devices, the microelectronics industry continues to push for smaller and smaller feature sizes. [30] Human pathogens, such as HIV and viruses causing respiratory tract infection, have molecular fingerprints that are difficult to distinguish. To better detect these pathogens, sensors in diagnostic tools need to manipulate light on a nanoscale. [29] Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful. [28] Metal oxide frameworks, or MOFs, are solid materials which can behave like ultra-fine sponges. The cavities in the sponge are of nanosize—about the size of individual molecules. [27]
Category: Condensed Matter

[2] viXra:1909.0003 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 05:12:34

Laser Printing Waterproof E-Textiles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

The next generation of waterproof smart fabrics will be laser printed and made in minutes. That's the future imagined by the researchers behind new e-textile technology. [31] To increase the processing speed and reduce the power consumption of electronic devices, the microelectronics industry continues to push for smaller and smaller feature sizes. [30] Human pathogens, such as HIV and viruses causing respiratory tract infection, have molecular fingerprints that are difficult to distinguish. To better detect these pathogens, sensors in diagnostic tools need to manipulate light on a nanoscale. [29] Scientists are using nanoparticle screening on personal care products and finding previously thought toxic chemicals may not be harmful. [28]
Category: Condensed Matter

[1] viXra:1909.0002 [pdf] submitted on 2019-09-01 05:35:09

Possible New Electron-Pairing Medium in Superconductors: a TDDFT Study of Nb, Nb3ge, Pb and MgB2

Authors: Tiege Zhou
Comments: 6 Pages.

Besides the electron-lattice interaction, the author proposes that the change of the electron clouds of ions can be a new electron-pairing medium in superconductors. Real-time evolution of the charge densities in Nb, Nb3Ge, Pb and MgB2 was calculated by the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The electron clouds of Nb atoms change significantly in Nb and Nb3Ge. The natural frequencies are 125 meV and 156 meV, respectively. The frequencies are close to those of lattice vibrations, showing that the change of the electron clouds of the ions can be the electron-pairing medium. For Pb and MgB2, no similar result was obtained.
Category: Condensed Matter