Condensed Matter

1908 Submissions

[31] viXra:1908.0455 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-21 08:08:17

Rhodochrosite Optical Indicatrix

Authors: Ricardo Gobato, Marcia Regina Risso Gobato, Alireza Heidari, Abhijit Mitra
Comments: 2 Pages. Peer Res Nest. 2019 - 1(3) PNEST.19.08.020.

The name rhodochrosite is from the Greek ῤοδοχρωϛ (ῤοδο - rose + χρωϛ - color). It is said the inca rose designation is based on the “fact” that some of it comes from stalctitic and stalagmitic growths in silver mines worked by the ancient Incas. The electric charge that accumulates in certain solid materials, such as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins) in response to applied mechanical stress, phenomenon called piezoelectricity. The electronic oscillator circuit that uses the mechanical resonance of a vibrating crystal of piezoelectric material to create an electrical signal with a precise frequency is a crystal oscillator. The most common type of piezoelectric resonator used is the quartz crystal, so oscillator circuits incorporating them became known as crystal oscillators.
Category: Condensed Matter

[30] viXra:1908.0382 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 02:32:58

Stronger Graphene Oxide Paper

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 81 Pages.

A new study from Northwestern University researchers shows that better GO "paper" can be made by mixing strong, solid GO flakes with weak, porous GO flakes. [48] This research was supported by the Institute for Basic Science, and has been published in the journal Advanced Materials. [47] The team has turned graphene oxide (GO) into a soft, moldable and kneadable play dough that can be shaped and reshaped into free-standing, three-dimensional structures. [46]
Category: Condensed Matter

[29] viXra:1908.0370 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-19 05:51:52

Origin Geopathic and Technogenic Radiations and Mechanism Their Influence on Health

Authors: Korniienko V/, Viculin I.
Comments: 12 Pages. In Russian

The origin of the geopathic radiations (GR) scientifically isn't proved, but it is known that their influence causes diseases. The experiments made by us demonstrate that S-radiations, which at deformation are generated by any matter have the same properties. Their origin is caused by the fact that interaction of energies of the fundamental particles of which matter consists create in it the quantum electromagnetic field (QEF). Therefore deformation of matter causes indignation of its QEF in the form of quantum electromagnetic waves which are S-radiations. The globe is subject to influence of various forces which deform its matter therefore its QEF generates the S-radiations known as GR. Existence in matter of QEF cause also property of electric generators together with electric current to develop quantum currents. Technique will transform them to technogenic S-radiations which influence, as well as GR, causes diseases therefore it is offered to protect from them people.
Category: Condensed Matter

[28] viXra:1908.0368 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 10:37:27

Expanded Ion Beams Devices

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

A Purdue University analytical chemistry group has developed a new device to help generate intense beams of large ions, which can be used for the fabrication of energy storage devices, optical coatings, purification of proteins and metabolites from complex biological samples, and nanoclusters from reaction mixtures. [32] Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode. [31] Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Condensed Matter

[27] viXra:1908.0361 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-18 00:45:45

Epsilon-Near-Zero Material

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

High-harmonic generation (HHG) is a nonlinear optical phenomenon through which high harmonics of an intense laser beam are generated in a target material, typically a gas. [33] A Purdue University analytical chemistry group has developed a new device to help generate intense beams of large ions, which can be used for the fabrication of energy storage devices, optical coatings, purification of proteins and metabolites from complex biological samples, and nanoclusters from reaction mixtures. [32] Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode. [31] Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Condensed Matter

[26] viXra:1908.0351 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-16 09:50:06

Thinnest Ever Optical Waveguide

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Researchers have succeeded in making the thinnest ever optical device in the form of a waveguide just three atomic layers thick. [42] With the development of nanotechnologies, scientists’ efforts have centred on synchronizing oscillatory nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), for applications such as on-chip time keeping, and mass, gas, and force sensors. [41] A Rice University lab wants its products to look sharp, even at the nanoscale. Its latest creation is right on target. [40] Group of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are offering a novel solution for high-yield nanowire production from zinc oxide—cheaper and environmentally friendlier material, compared to the rare earth elements such as indium, arsenic or gallium often used in electronics production. [39]
Category: Condensed Matter

[25] viXra:1908.0338 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 02:17:18

Stripe Order Mystery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

One of the greatest mysteries in condensed matter physics is the exact relationship between charge order and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors. [26] Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science. [25] Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconductors in which they change from superconductor to special metal and then to insulator. [24] Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. [23] Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in "stripe-ordered" cuprates-copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism-discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. [22] This discovery makes it clear that in order to understand the mechanism behind the enigmatic high temperature superconductivity of the cuprates, this exotic PDW state needs to be taken into account, and therefore opens a new frontier in cuprate research. [21] High-temperature (Tc) superconductivity typically develops from antiferromagnetic insulators, and superconductivity and ferromagnetism are always mutually exclusive. [20] Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a method to accurately measure the "exact edge" or onset at which a magnetic field enters a superconducting material. [19] TU Wien has now made a major advance towards achieving this goal and, at the same time, has furthered an understanding of why conventional materials only become superconducting at around-200°C [18] The emerging field of spintronics leverages electron spin and magnetization. [17]
Category: Condensed Matter

[24] viXra:1908.0337 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 02:38:17

Trapped Dipolar Supersolid

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 21 Pages.

Supersolids, solid materials with superfluid properties (i.e., in which a substance can flow with zero viscosity), have recently become the focus of numerous physics studies. [31] A team of physicists has uncovered a new state of matter-a breakthrough that offers promise for increasing storage capabilities in electronic devices and enhancing quantum computing. [30] A potentially useful material for building quantum computers has been unearthed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), whose scientists have found a superconductor that could sidestep one of the primary obstacles standing in the way of effective quantum logic circuits. [29] Important challenges in creating practical quantum computers have been addressed by two independent teams of physicists in the US. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits-circuits that have zero electrical resistance-can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Condensed Matter

[23] viXra:1908.0336 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 03:04:04

Protect Electronic Devices

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode. [31] Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23]
Category: Condensed Matter

[22] viXra:1908.0335 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-17 03:37:36

Superconductor Comes from Disorder

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

Discovered more than 100 years ago, superconductivity continues to captivate scientists who seek to develop components for highly efficient energy transmission, ultrafast electronics or quantum bits for next-generation computation. [27] One of the greatest mysteries in condensed matter physics is the exact relationship between charge order and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors. [26] Cuprates hold the record high superconducting temperature at ambient pressure so far, but understanding their superconducting mechanism remains one of the great challenges of physical sciences listed as one of 125 quests announced by Science. [25] Now, scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University report curious multi-state transitions of these superconductors in which they change from superconductor to special metal and then to insulator. [24] Researchers at the Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute and the Southern Scientific Center of RAS, in Russia, have recently fabricated quasi-2-D superconductors at the interface between a ferroelectric Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3 film and an insulating parent compound of La2CuO4. [23] Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in "stripe-ordered" cuprates-copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism-discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. [22] This discovery makes it clear that in order to understand the mechanism behind the enigmatic high temperature superconductivity of the cuprates, this exotic PDW state needs to be taken into account, and therefore opens a new frontier in cuprate research. [21] High-temperature (Tc) superconductivity typically develops from antiferromagnetic insulators, and superconductivity and ferromagnetism are always mutually exclusive.
Category: Condensed Matter

[21] viXra:1908.0322 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-16 04:03:28

Carbon Nanotube Fibres

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Scientists at Texas Heart Institute (THI) and Rice University have used biocompatible fibres made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as electrical bridges to restore conductivity to damaged hearts. [38] A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Japan has developed a way to strengthen graphene-based membranes intended for use in desalination projects—by fortifying them with nanotubes. [37] The team arrived at their results by imaging gold nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 5 nanometres, via aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. [36]
Category: Condensed Matter

[20] viXra:1908.0303 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-14 13:14:05

Optomechanical Nano-Oscillators

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

With the development of nanotechnologies, scientists’ efforts have centred on synchronizing oscillatory nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), for applications such as on-chip time keeping, and mass, gas, and force sensors. [41] A Rice University lab wants its products to look sharp, even at the nanoscale. Its latest creation is right on target. [40] Group of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are offering a novel solution for high-yield nanowire production from zinc oxide—cheaper and environmentally friendlier material, compared to the rare earth elements such as indium, arsenic or gallium often used in electronics production. [39]
Category: Condensed Matter

[19] viXra:1908.0295 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-15 07:53:42

Rhodochrosite as Crystal Oscillator

Authors: Ricardo Gobato, Marcia Regina Risso Gobato, Alireza Heidari
Comments: 1 Page.

h as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins) in response to applied mechanical stress, phenomenon called piezoelectricity. A crystal oscillator is an electronic oscillator circuit that uses the mechanical resonance of a vibrating crystal of piezoelectric material to create an electrical signal with a precise frequency. The most common type of piezoelectric resonator used is th quartz crystal, so oscillator circuits incorporating them became known as crystal oscillators. Particularly one using a quartz crystal, works by distorting the crystal with an electric field, when voltage is applied to an electrode near or on the crystal. This property is known as electrostriction or inverse piezoelectricity. When the field is removed, the quartz - which oscillates in a precise frequency - generates an electric field as it returns to its previous shape, and this can generate a voltage. The result is that a quartz crystal behaves like an RLC circuit, but with a much higher Q. Quartz crystals are manufactured for frequencies from a few tens of kilohertz to hundreds of megahertz. More than two billion crystal are manufactured annually. Most are used for consumer devices such as wristwatches, clocks, radios, radios, computers, cell phones, signal generators and oscilloscopes
Category: Condensed Matter

[18] viXra:1908.0265 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-12 08:35:41

Superconductivity, Passive-Rotation and Levitation.

Authors: Brian Strom
Comments: 7 Pages.

The forces of nature are reviewed and analyzed from first principles, without any pre-conceptions. The review is based on the earlier analysis of Energy Fields around conductors, solenoids, permanent magnets and rotating bodies [1]. In this paper, we develop further proposals for interactions between energy fields. The results may provide an alternative explanation for passive-rotation and also for super-conducting-levitation and Cooper Pairs.
Category: Condensed Matter

[17] viXra:1908.0262 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-12 10:05:14

Plasmonic-Photonic Crystals

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 76 Pages.

A group of researchers led by Professor Myakzyum Salakhov has been working on the problem of optical states in plasmonic-photonic crystals (PPCs). [41] Such plasmonic resonances have significant roles in biosensing with ability to improve the resolution and sensitivity required to detect particles at the scale of the single molecule. [40] A novel quantum effect observed in a carbon nanotube film could lead to the development of unique lasers and other optoelectronic devices, according to scientists at Rice University and Tokyo Metropolitan University. [39]
Category: Condensed Matter

[16] viXra:1908.0261 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-12 10:29:31

Thinnest Optical Waveguide Channels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 78 Pages.

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the thinnest optical device in the world—a waveguide that is three layers of atoms thin. [42] A group of researchers led by Professor Myakzyum Salakhov has been working on the problem of optical states in plasmonic-photonic crystals (PPCs). [41] Such plasmonic resonances have significant roles in biosensing with ability to improve the resolution and sensitivity required to detect particles at the scale of the single molecule. [40]
Category: Condensed Matter

[15] viXra:1908.0244 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-13 03:52:52

Atoms Vibrate in Graphene Nanostructures

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

Researchers from the University of Vienna, the Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, the company JEOL and La Sapienza University in Rome have developed a method capable to measure all phonons existing in a nanostructured material. [48] Now, researchers from Brown University's School of Engineering have explained how the phenomenon works, and that explanation could pave the way for a new type of controlled molecular self-assembly. [47] The team has turned graphene oxide (GO) into a soft, moldable and kneadable play dough that can be shaped and reshaped into free-standing, three-dimensional structures. [46]
Category: Condensed Matter

[14] viXra:1908.0243 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-13 04:13:18

Patterns in Water and Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 80 Pages.

Called solitons, these phenomena emerge as solitary waves and can travel long distances while maintaining their shape and speed, even after colliding with other waves. [48] Now, researchers from Brown University's School of Engineering have explained how the phenomenon works, and that explanation could pave the way for a new type of controlled molecular self-assembly. [47] The team has turned graphene oxide (GO) into a soft, moldable and kneadable play dough that can be shaped and reshaped into free-standing, three-dimensional structures. [46]
Category: Condensed Matter

[13] viXra:1908.0241 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-13 04:29:05

Zinc Oxide Nanowires

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Group of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are offering a novel solution for high-yield nanowire production from zinc oxide—cheaper and environmentally friendlier material, compared to the rare earth elements such as indium, arsenic or gallium often used in electronics production. [39] With international collaboration, researchers at Aalto University have now developed a nanosized amplifier to help light signals propagate through microchips. [38] Physicists at the Kastler Brossel Laboratory in Paris have reached a milestone in the combination of cold atoms and nanophotonics. [37]
Category: Condensed Matter

[12] viXra:1908.0240 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-13 04:44:47

Atom-Flat Compounds for Optoelectronics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A Rice University lab wants its products to look sharp, even at the nanoscale. Its latest creation is right on target. [40] Group of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are offering a novel solution for high-yield nanowire production from zinc oxide—cheaper and environmentally friendlier material, compared to the rare earth elements such as indium, arsenic or gallium often used in electronics production. [39] With international collaboration, researchers at Aalto University have now developed a nanosized amplifier to help light signals propagate through microchips. [38] Physicists at the Kastler Brossel Laboratory in Paris have reached a milestone in the combination of cold atoms and nanophotonics. [37]
Category: Condensed Matter

[11] viXra:1908.0200 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-10 09:00:34

Chaotic Active Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Topological defects in the structure of materials known as active nematics can act as rods that mix the fluids – much like one might mix colours in white paint. [34] When a container of silicone oil or other similar liquid is vertically shaken at a regular frequency, 1-millimeter-sized droplets of the same liquid placed on the liquid's surface appear to "walk" across the surface at speeds of about 1 cm/second, propelled by their own waves. [33] Almost all living organisms from bacteria to humans have gate-like protein complexes in their cell membranes that get rid of unwanted or life-threatening molecules. [32]
Category: Condensed Matter

[10] viXra:1908.0122 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-08 01:00:29

Color-Converting Crystal

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

At the heart of his field of nonlinear optics are devices that change light from one color to another-a process important for many technologies within telecommunications, computing and laser-based equipment and science. [30] Researchers from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics have proposed a new design for a multimode stripline resonator. [29] In addition to helping resolve many of the technical challenges of non-line-of-sight imaging, the technology, Velten notes, can be made to be both inexpensive and compact, meaning real-world applications are just a matter of time. [28] Researchers in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. [27] Insights from quantum physics have allowed engineers to incorporate components used in circuit boards, optical fibers, and control systems in new applications ranging from smartphones to advanced microprocessors. [26] In a paper published August 1, 2019 as an Editors' Suggestion in the journal Physical Review Letters, scientists at JQI and Michigan State University suggest that certain materials may experience a spontaneous twisting force if they are hotter than their surroundings. [25] The technology could allow for new capabilities in quantum computing, including modems that link together many quantum computers at different locations. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21]
Category: Condensed Matter

[9] viXra:1908.0121 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-08 01:16:47

Topological Insulator in Bismuth Crystal

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Now, researchers at MIT along with colleagues in Boston, Singapore, and Taiwan have conducted a theoretical analysis to reveal several more previously unidentified topological properties of bismuth. [31] At the heart of his field of nonlinear optics are devices that change light from one color to another-a process important for many technologies within telecommunications, computing and laser-based equipment and science. [30] Researchers from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics have proposed a new design for a multimode stripline resonator. [29] In addition to helping resolve many of the technical challenges of non-line-of-sight imaging, the technology, Velten notes, can be made to be both inexpensive and compact, meaning real-world applications are just a matter of time. [28] Researchers in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. [27] Insights from quantum physics have allowed engineers to incorporate components used in circuit boards, optical fibers, and control systems in new applications ranging from smartphones to advanced microprocessors. [26] In a paper published August 1, 2019 as an Editors' Suggestion in the journal Physical Review Letters, scientists at JQI and Michigan State University suggest that certain materials may experience a spontaneous twisting force if they are hotter than their surroundings. [25] The technology could allow for new capabilities in quantum computing, including modems that link together many quantum computers at different locations. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22]
Category: Condensed Matter

[8] viXra:1908.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-08 01:31:18

Nano Scale Microwave Generation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

Spin-torque oscillators (STOs) are nanoscale devices that generate microwaves using changes in magnetic field direction, but those produced by any individual device are too weak for practical applications. [32] Now, researchers at MIT along with colleagues in Boston, Singapore, and Taiwan have conducted a theoretical analysis to reveal several more previously unidentified topological properties of bismuth. [31] At the heart of his field of nonlinear optics are devices that change light from one color to another-a process important for many technologies within telecommunications, computing and laser-based equipment and science. [30] Researchers from Siberian Federal University and Kirensky Institute of Physics have proposed a new design for a multimode stripline resonator. [29] In addition to helping resolve many of the technical challenges of non-line-of-sight imaging, the technology, Velten notes, can be made to be both inexpensive and compact, meaning real-world applications are just a matter of time. [28] Researchers in the Department of Physics of ETH Zurich have measured how electrons in so-called transition metals get redistributed within a fraction of an optical oscillation cycle. [27] Insights from quantum physics have allowed engineers to incorporate components used in circuit boards, optical fibers, and control systems in new applications ranging from smartphones to advanced microprocessors. [26] In a paper published August 1, 2019 as an Editors' Suggestion in the journal Physical Review Letters, scientists at JQI and Michigan State University suggest that certain materials may experience a spontaneous twisting force if they are hotter than their surroundings. [25] The technology could allow for new capabilities in quantum computing, including modems that link together many quantum computers at different locations. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23]
Category: Condensed Matter

[7] viXra:1908.0106 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-06 08:36:33

Spin Transport in Graphene

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Researchers from the ICN2 Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group have proposed a modified graphene-based nanodevice fabrication technique that increases up to three times the spin lifetime and relaxation length compared to previous work of the same kind. [33] This study provides a further step in the design of future biosynthetic hybrids to recover injured nerve tissues functions." [32] In a recent study now published on Light: Science & Applications, Yuchao Li and colleagues at the Institute of Nanophotonics in China, developed an optical microscope system using living cells as tiny lenses to image and manipulate objects smaller than the wavelength of light. [31] A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a way to create catenanes and a molecular trefoil knot out of para-connected benzene rings. [30] Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have devised a new process for using nano-particles to build powerful lasers that are more efficient and safer for your eyes. [29] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them. [28] Self-assembly and crystallisation of nanoparticles (NPs) is generally a complex process, based on the evaporation or precipitation of NP-building blocks. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24]
Category: Condensed Matter

[6] viXra:1908.0064 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-05 06:37:32

Hexagonal Graphene Quantum Dots

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

A KAIST team has designed a novel strategy for synthesizing single-crystalline graphene quantum dots, which emit stable blue light. [31] Now, a Rutgers-led team has paved the way to solving one of the most enduring mysteries in materials physics by discovering that in the presence of a moiré pattern in graphene, electrons organize themselves into stripes, like soldiers in formation. [30] have developed a graphene device that's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits. [29] Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. [28] US researchers studying high-temperature cuprate superconductors outside the superconducting regime have used cutting-edge X-ray scattering to detect long-predicted-but never previously observed-excitations called plasmons perpendicular to the material's atomic planes. [27] Using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) techniques, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory discovered a new quantum criticality in a superconducting material, leading to a greater understanding of the link between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity. [26] Improving these devices could mean more powerful computers, better detectors of disease and technological advances scientists can't even predict yet. [25] Researchers at the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have demonstrated a new way to address a central problem in quantum physics: at the quantum scale, any measurement disturbs the measured object. [24] An answer to a quantum-physical question provided by the algorithm Melvin has uncovered a hidden link between quantum experiments and the mathematical field of Graph Theory. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22]
Category: Condensed Matter

[5] viXra:1908.0058 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-04 04:59:44

Graphene Superconductor Discovery

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Now, a Rutgers-led team has paved the way to solving one of the most enduring mysteries in materials physics by discovering that in the presence of a moiré pattern in graphene, electrons organize themselves into stripes, like soldiers in formation. [30] Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a graphene device that's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits. [29] Scientists at HZB have found evidence that double layers of graphene have a property that may let them conduct current completely without resistance. [28]
Category: Condensed Matter

[4] viXra:1908.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-04 05:20:36

Low Voltage LED

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

When atomically thin semiconductors are combined together in a Lego style, they emit light at a lower voltage potentially leading to low energy consumption devices. [43] In a finding that runs counter to a common assumption in physics, researchers at the University of Michigan ran a light emitting diode (LED) with electrodes reversed in order to cool another device mere nanometers away. [42] With enhanced understanding of this system, the Quantum Dynamics Unit aims to improve upon the industry standard for qubits – bits of quantum information. [41]
Category: Condensed Matter

[3] viXra:1908.0056 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-04 05:36:03

Nanotechnology with Ion Beams

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38] Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. [37] More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate. [36] Researchers at the Max Born Institute have now generated directed currents at terahertz (THz) frequencies, much higher than the clock rates of current electronics. [35] Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a simple yet accurate method for finding defects in the latest generation of silicon carbide transistors. [34] In 2017, University of Utah physicist Valy Vardeny called perovskite a "miracle material" for an emerging field of next-generation electronics, called spintronics, and he's standing by that assertion. [33] Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology proposed new quasi-1-D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. [32] They do this by using "excitons," electrically neutral quasiparticles that exist in insulators, semiconductors and in some liquids. [31] Researchers at ETH Zurich have now developed a method that makes it possible to couple such a spin qubit strongly to microwave photons. [30] Quantum dots that emit entangled photon pairs on demand could be used in quantum communication networks. [29] Researchers successfully integrated the systems-donor atoms and quantum dots. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27]
Category: Condensed Matter

[2] viXra:1908.0055 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-04 06:45:02

Atomically Precise Synthesis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Chemists have predicted zigzag-edged triangular graphene molecules (ZTGMs) to host ferromagnetically coupled edge states, with net spin scaling with the molecular size. Such molecules can afford large spin tunability, which is crucial to engineer next-generation molecular spintronics. [39] An international research team around physicist Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna has succeeded in producing the world's densest complex nano arrays for anchoring flux quanta, the fluxons. [38]
Category: Condensed Matter

[1] viXra:1908.0023 [pdf] submitted on 2019-08-01 07:58:00

DNA Origami Innovation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 67 Pages.

Researchers have developed a faster, cheaper and simpler alternative to typical DNA origami fabrication, increasing the technique's accessibility and potential impact in industry and clinical settings. [41] Two physicists working out of the University of Florida and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Paul Johns and Juan Nino, conducted research to enhance global nuclear security by improving radiation detectors. [40] Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites are especially successful, and they have been used in optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, light-emitting diodes and lasers. [39] A new microscope breaks a long-standing speed limit, recording footage of brain activity 15 times faster than scientists once believed possible. [38] Engineers at Duke University have developed a method for extracting a color image from a single exposure of light scattered through a mostly opaque material. [37] Physicists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, have devised a method to turn a non-magnetic metal into a magnet using laser light. [36] Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. [35] The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip. [34] University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab. [33] A new advance by researchers at MIT could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes. [32]
Category: Condensed Matter