Artificial Intelligence

1609 Submissions

[5] viXra:1609.0311 [pdf] submitted on 2016-09-21 07:22:05

Artificial Intelligence Discover New Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. [12] The artificial intelligence system's ability to set itself up quickly every morning and compensate for any overnight fluctuations would make this fragile technology much more useful for field measurements, said co-lead researcher Dr Michael Hush from UNSW ADFA. [11] Quantum physicist Mario Krenn and his colleagues in the group of Anton Zeilinger from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have developed an algorithm which designs new useful quantum experiments. As the computer does not rely on human intuition, it finds novel unfamiliar solutions. [10] Researchers at the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering and the University of Konstanz have demonstrated the ability to generate a quantum logic operation, or rotation of the qubit, that-surprisingly—is intrinsically resilient to noise as well as to variations in the strength or duration of the control. Their achievement is based on a geometric concept known as the Berry phase and is implemented through entirely optical means within a single electronic spin in diamond. [9] New research demonstrates that particles at the quantum level can in fact be seen as behaving something like billiard balls rolling along a table, and not merely as the probabilistic smears that the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests. But there's a catch-the tracks the particles follow do not always behave as one would expect from "realistic" trajectories, but often in a fashion that has been termed "surrealistic." [8] Quantum entanglement—which occurs when two or more particles are correlated in such a way that they can influence each other even across large distances—is not an all-or-nothing phenomenon, but occurs in various degrees. The more a quantum state is entangled with its partner, the better the states will perform in quantum information applications. Unfortunately, quantifying entanglement is a difficult process involving complex optimization problems that give even physicists headaches. [7] A trio of physicists in Europe has come up with an idea that they believe would allow a person to actually witness entanglement. Valentina Caprara Vivoli, with the University of Geneva, Pavel Sekatski, with the University of Innsbruck and Nicolas Sangouard, with the University of Basel, have together written a paper describing a scenario where a human subject would be able to witness an instance of entanglement—they have uploaded it to the arXiv server for review by others. [6] The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the relativistic quantum theory.
Category: Artificial Intelligence

[4] viXra:1609.0238 [pdf] submitted on 2016-09-15 19:25:33

Revision on Fuzzy Artificial Potential Field for Humanoid Robot Path Planning in Unknown Environment

Authors: Mahdi Fakoor, Amirreza Kosari, Mohsen Jafarzadeh
Comments: 10 Pages.

Path planning in a completely known environment has been experienced various ways. However, in real world, most humanoid robots work in unknown environments. Robots' path planning by artificial potential field and fuzzy artificial potential field methods are very popular in the field of robotics navigation. However, by default humanoid robots lack range sensors; thus, traditional artificial potential field approaches needs to adopt themselves to these limitations. This paper investigates two different approaches for path planning of a humanoid robot in an unknown environment using fuzzy artificial potential (FAP) method. In the first approach, the direction of the moving robot is derived from fuzzified artificial potential field whereas in the second one, the direction of the robot is extracted from some linguistic rules that are inspired from artificial potential field. These two introduced trajectory design approaches are validated though some software and hardware in the loop simulations and the experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approaches in humanoid robot real-time trajectory planning problems.
Category: Artificial Intelligence

[3] viXra:1609.0134 [pdf] submitted on 2016-09-10 11:19:00

War Algorithm Accountability

Authors: Dustin A. Lewis, Gabriella Blum, Naz K. Modirzadeh
Comments: 244 Pages.

Compendium on Accountability issues as pertains to Lethal Autonomous Weapons
Category: Artificial Intelligence

[2] viXra:1609.0133 [pdf] submitted on 2016-09-10 12:00:18

Five Hundred Deep Learning Papers, Graphviz and Python

Authors: Daniele Ettore Ciriello
Comments: 13 Pages.

I invested days creating a graph with PyGraphviz to repre- sent the evolutionary process of deep learning’s state of the art for the last twenty-five years. Through this paper I want to show you how and what I obtained.
Category: Artificial Intelligence

[1] viXra:1609.0126 [pdf] submitted on 2016-09-10 04:54:56

Deep Neural Networks

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

Nobody understands why deep neural networks are so good at solving complex problems. Now physicists say the secret is buried in the laws of physics. [12] A team of researchers working at the University of California (and one from Stony Brook University) has for the first time created a neural-network chip that was built using just memristors. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they built their chip and what capabilities it has. [11] A team of researchers used a promising new material to build more functional memristors, bringing us closer to brain-like computing. Both academic and industrial laboratories are working to develop computers that operate more like the human brain. Instead of operating like a conventional, digital system, these new devices could potentially function more like a network of neurons. [10] Cambridge Quantum Computing Limited (CQCL) has built a new Fastest Operating System aimed at running the futuristic superfast quantum computers. [9] IBM scientists today unveiled two critical advances towards the realization of a practical quantum computer. For the first time, they showed the ability to detect and measure both kinds of quantum errors simultaneously, as well as demonstrated a new, square quantum bit circuit design that is the only physical architecture that could successfully scale to larger dimensions. [8] Physicists at the Universities of Bonn and Cambridge have succeeded in linking two completely different quantum systems to one another. In doing so, they have taken an important step forward on the way to a quantum computer. To accomplish their feat the researchers used a method that seems to function as well in the quantum world as it does for us people: teamwork. The results have now been published in the "Physical Review Letters". [7] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer.
Category: Artificial Intelligence