Relativity and Cosmology

   

Michelson and Morley, Sagnac, the Train and the Ongoing Ether Debate

Authors: John Raymond

Abstract: The 1887 Michelson and Morley experiment continues to be widely seen by mainstream physicists as producing a null result. This is not correct. It produced a less than expected result that at that time could not be explained by science. It seems likely that mainstream physicists will continue to see the results of the Michelson and Morley experiment as being a null result. The reasons for this seem unfathomable. Numerous experiments conducted be respected physicists since 1887 have demonstrated a positive result by replicable experiments. This includes Sagnac in 1913. The Sagnac experiment has never been seriously challenged by the physics community. As a concept scientist I talk about these matters. I have employed Einstein’s lightning, train and observers analogy as a means of demonstrating that the Sagnac effect seems to be a demonstrably reliable theory. This includes other similar theories as well. This is in regards to the splitting of light and the subsequent projection of the resulting two new light sources onto the same surface. conceptscience@bigpond.com

Comments: 23 Pages.

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Submission history

[v1] 2018-05-23 23:21:45

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