Relativity and Cosmology

   

Confronting the Galilean Transformation with the Field Shapes of a Constant-Velocity Point Charge

Authors: Steven Kauffmann

The space-time Galilean transformation is predicated on a salient theme of Galilean/Newtonian physics: relative motion at constant velocity has no physical consequences beyond the minimum which is required by that motion's existence. Therefore, since the electric field produced by a point charge at rest is spherically symmetric around the charge's location, and since a point charge at rest produces zero magnetic field, Galilean physics implies that a point charge moving at constant velocity produces an electric field which is spherically symmetric around that charge's instantaneous location and that it produces zero magnetic field. But the Biot-Savart-Maxwell Law has it that a point charge moving at nonzero constant velocity produces nonzero magnetic field, and Faraday's Law has it that this time-varying magnetic field, which has zero component along the line of the charge's motion, produces an electric field which isn't spherically symmetric around the charge's instantaneous location. Thus the space-time Galilean transformation is violated by electromagnetic phenomena in a definite way, and must be modified. The needed modification produces the space-time Lorentz transformation, which can straightforwardly be shown to never change the speed of electromagnetic radiation. The fate of the Galilean/Newtonian constant-velocity relative-motion paradigm was actually already sealed when it was observed that the presence of direct current in a wire deflects an adjacent compass needle.

Comments: 13 Pages.

Download: PDF

Submission history

[v1] 2017-09-15 07:02:57
[v2] 2017-09-16 09:31:42
[v3] 2017-09-16 11:38:01
[v4] 2017-10-04 04:06:00
[v5] 2017-10-06 22:36:14
[v6] 2017-10-07 22:16:31
[v7] 2017-10-08 13:00:24
[v8] 2017-10-10 09:40:34
[v9] 2017-10-12 04:47:52
[vA] 2017-10-14 17:21:26
[vB] 2017-10-15 21:43:27
[vC] 2017-10-17 19:08:04

Unique-IP document downloads: 35 times

Vixra.org is a pre-print repository rather than a journal. Articles hosted may not yet have been verified by peer-review and should be treated as preliminary. In particular, anything that appears to include financial or legal advice or proposed medical treatments should be treated with due caution. Vixra.org will not be responsible for any consequences of actions that result from any form of use of any documents on this website.

Add your own feedback and questions here:
You are equally welcome to be positive or negative about any paper but please be polite. If you are being critical you must mention at least one specific error, otherwise your comment will be deleted as unhelpful.

comments powered by Disqus