General Science and Philosophy

   

The Logical Structure of Philosophy Psychology, Mind and Language in Wittgenstein and Searle

Authors: Michael Starks

I provide a critical survey of some of the major findings of Wittgenstein and Searle on the logical structure of intentionality (mind, language, behavior), taking as my starting point Wittgenstein’s fundamental discovery –that all truly ‘philosophical’ problems are the same—confusions about how to use language in a particular context, and so all solutions are the same—looking at how language can be used in the context at issue so that its truth conditions (Conditions of Satisfaction or COS) are clear. The basic problem is that one can say anything but one cannot mean (state clear COS for) any arbitrary utterance and meaning is only possible in a very specific context. I begin with ‘On Certainty’ and continue the analysis of recent writings by and about them from the perspective of the two systems of thought, employing a new table of intentionality and new dual systems nomenclature.

Comments: 81 Pages. newest version 11/6/16

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Submission history

[v1] 2016-08-09 22:33:54
[v2] 2016-11-06 08:46:55

Unique-IP document downloads: 41 times

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